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Full text of "Antioch News 12/01/2000"



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ftHTIOCH TDUHSHIP LIBRARY 

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AN7I0CH PUBLIC m 
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60002 





FOUNDED 1886 



DECEMBER 1-7, 2000 



75 cents 



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Inside: 



CLASSIFIEDS 

Need a car, job or apt? 

Look in Lake County's largest 

classified section pagebi2 



HOLIDAY MEMORIES 

Readers share their 
stories and photos 

SEE PULL-OUT IN SECTION C 



MAKING MUSIC 

Three area groups join 
together in harmony 



SEE LAKELIFE 





the millennium 

Touring statue fulfills a dream for many 



ByTIMFROEHUG 
Staff Reporter 




Despite having passed 
away in June ofl 999, 
one-time Oak Lawn 
resident Carl Demma's 
dream is still being fulfilled. 

Lake County residents can see 
this dream first-hand— a 33-foot 
stainless steel statue sculpted in the 
likeness of the Virgin Mary. 

Until Dec. 11, the sculpture will 
sit on a large flatbed truck at 
Marytown's conventual Franciscan 
shrine and chapel, weighing In at 
8,*400 pouridsTBut this isn't just any * 
sculpture— this one has an intrigu- 
ing story behind its creation, 

"It's really rejuvenating the 
Archdiocese spiritually," said 
Marytown's publishing manager 
Dan Gallic 

Entitled "Our Lady of the New 
Millennium," the statue of the Virgin 
Mary has toured the Chicagoland 
area in communities such as Bridge- 
port, Oak Lawn and now Liber- 
tyvilJe. According to Gallio, Demma 
made a trip to a shrine in Italy in 
1994. While there, he was inspired to 
build a large statue in Mary's 
likeness— a project he had 
pondered since his youth. 

As a result, he hired sculptor 
and Massachusetts resident Charles 
Parks to make his dream a reality. 

"He sold his liquor distributor- 
ship to pursue this dream of his," 
said Gallio. 



Once the project was completed Samantha Peha-Vargas and Caroline Amrich, seventh-graders at 
in January of 1999, Demma drove Transfiguration School in Wauconda, chat under the watchful gaze 

of the Our Lady of the New Millennium statue at Marytown/Kolbe 
Please sec STATUE/ A2 Shrine in Ubertyville.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 




crimes case 
awaits jury trial 



By JUUE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 




The case of Rebecca Michalak, 
29, of Antioch who has been charged 
with two counts of aggravated crimi- 
nal sexual abuse and one count of 
child pornography was to have gone 
to jury trial before Judge John Philips 
on Nov. 20, but that trial date has 
been postponed to an undetermined 
date. 

According to the Circuit Court 
Clerk of Lake County, Michalak 



remains in custody awaiting her trial. 

The charges were brought when 
her former boyfriend found video- 
tapes of Michalak with his 15-year- 
old son and one of his son's friends. 
The man brought those tapes to the 
attention of the Lake County Sheriffs 
DepL 

According to police, the acts 
occurred during a four-month period 
between June and September in the 
former boyfriend's home in unincor- 
porated Antioch. The son told police 
he had sex with Michalak 10 times. 



Business to collect 
gifts, foodf or needy 



By JUUE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 



Keller Williams Stateline Realty is 
doing its part to make sure the 
holidays are happy for all with its 
sixth annual holiday charity drive. 

Unique to the realty office is the 
Keller Williams Sharing Tree. The 
tree benefits boys and girls from the 
Central Baptist Children's Home in 
Lake Villa, and the Allendale Associa- 
tion Specialized Foster Care in 
Bristol, Wis. by granting individual 
gift wishes. 

Cards with the wishes of the 
children from each agency are 
written and hung on this special tree. 
Individuals, businesses and commu- 
nity groups may sponsor a child by 
stopping by the realty office and 
taking a wish card from the tree and 
fulfilling the gift request. Gifts should 
be brought to Keller Williams by Dec. 
6, and the realty office will then 



distribute the gifts to the appropriate 
home or shelter. 

"The Sharing Tree has become a 
popular holiday tradition around 
Antioch," said event coordinator 
Christine Sheehan, market center 
administrator for Keller Williams. 
"It's a great way to get into the 
holiday spirit and make Christmas a 
happier time for some less fortunate 
children." 

According to Sheehan, local 
grade and high school students have 
helped their peers by participating in 
the program. "It's great to see the kids 
pitching in. The Wilmot Grade 
School in Wilmot, Wis. will be grant- 
ing about 30 wishes this year." 

Sheehan added that some 
businesses have opted to participate 
in the Sharing Tree program instead 
of gift exchanges or secret Santa 
parties. 

Please see NEEDY/ A2 



Schmidt ready to assume County Board leadership 

Dist 3 Rep. could become first woman elected president 



Barring any last minute vote 
switches or 11th hour deals, Lake 
County Board members will elect the 
first woman chair in history at a 
reorganization meeting at 9 a.m. 
Monday, Dec. 4. 

"I'm ready. I've been working. 
Everything looks OK," exclaimed 
County Board Rep. -Suzi Schmidt (R- 
Lakc Villa), a 12-year veteran of the 
elected body that administers and 
legislates county government. 

Twenty-three representatives 
from single-member districts will 
convene to select a new chairperson. 



Following election of a new chair and 
vice chair, members will immediate- 
ly convene as commissioners of the 
Lake County Forest Preserve Dist. to 
select leadership for the coming two 
years. 

Schmidt, vivacious and indepen- 
dent, is rounding out a term as vice 
chair, serving under retiring County 
Chairman Jim LaBclle (R-Zion) who 
did not seek re-election in Nov. 7 
balloting. 

"I've been a big part of LaBelle's 
administration. We've shared a lot of 
duties. Lake County has made a lot of 



progress under Jim's leadership. I 
want to continue in die same direc- 
tion," declared Schmidt, who said 
she will continue to direct all her 
energy toward county government. 

"If I'm elected, I'll be the first 
chair who doesn't have another 
elected office or outside occupation," 
said Schmidt, long-time open space 
advocate and identified with the 
independent Republican wing of the 
board, now solidly in the majority. 

No serious challenger has 
emerged for Schmidt, odds-on 
favorite in the bi-annual speculation 



derby surrounding 

election of chairman, the 
most powerful elected 
job in Lake County. 
County chair has 
appointive power for all 
county jobs and also 
serves as county liquor 
commissioner. 

Within the past week, 
County Board Rep. Judy 
Martini (R-Antioch) has 
been receiving the most 
mention for vice chair. 
Until LaBelle involved 
Schmidt in active manage- 
ment, vice chair was a 
ceremonial position. 





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Schmidt: 'If I'm 

electedj I'll be the 

first chair who 

doesn't have 

another elected 

office or outside 

occupation.' 



Schmidt said she 
wants to involve munici- 
pal leaders more in 
county government, 
especially planning and 
zoning. She said on- 
going dialogue with 
village officials over 
finalization of the 
County Framework Plan 
is an example of her 
desire to work with the 
county's 51 cities and 
villages. (See related 
story in County Section 
B on the contest for 
Forest Preserve Dist 
president.) 



For main office, call (847) 223- 



or home delivery/ call (847) 245-7500 



MEDIA 



-A2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



. i ■ **" ** 



...il.'" 



COMMUNITY 



Students assist fire 



1 r in 



department with rescue 



By JUUE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 



Students taking part in Career Shadowing 
Day at the Antioch Fire Dept. had the opportu- 
nity to assist with a rescue in addition to the 
planned activities oflearning about all the dif- 
ferent skills and duties of a firefighter. 

The Antioch Fire Dept. responded to a re- 
port of a person trapped in a well in unincor- 
porated Antioch Township. According to in- 
formation director Lt. Chris Lienhardt, a con- 
struction worker was trapped in a crawl space 
of a house that was having some remodeling 
work done. "He was trapped by 6-foot by 6-foot 
piece of concrete and the wall." 

Lienhardt said that they have to assess the 
situation when there is a collapse and develop 
a "hot zone" and a perimeter zone around it. 



"The kids got to carry some of the equipment 
from the trucks to the perimeter zone," said 
Lienhardt. 

Members of the Antioch Rescue Squad as- 
sessed the injuries of the construction worker 
while the fire department used the ladder truck 
and heavy equipment to remove the victim. 
"The victim was conscious and alert," said 
Lienhardt. "He was stable but in some pain. We 
were able to pull the concrete off of him so that 
we could get him out." 

Fire chief Dennis Volling said, "This was a 
very difficult scene that required a total team 
effort." 

Though a Flight for Life Medi-Vac heli- 
copter had been requested, it returned when it 
was determined that the injuries were not life 
threatening. Additionally, Lake Villa and Fox 
Lake fire departments responded. 




FROM PAGE Al 



STATUE 



the statue to St. Louis, and erected it on the 
back of his truck near the motorcade route of 
Pope John Paul II, who was visiting the city. 
Consequently, the statue was blessed by the 
Pope. 

"He (Demma) was a very determined 
man," said Gallio. 

To the dismay of many, Demma died 
shortly thereafter on June 25, 2000. However, 
his death was not in vain. Thousands of peo- 
ple have had a chance to view or pray near 
the sculpture of the Virgin Mary, which many 
onlookers find fascinating simply because of 
its size. His wife has since picked up where 
he left off by allowing the statue to tour the 
Chicagoland area— something she hopes 
will inspire those who have the chance to 
view it. 



"Francine (his wife) has continued to car- 
ry out her husband's dream." said Gallio. 

The statue will continue to tour until the 
middle of next year, but until then, Marytown 
is proud to be hosting the Demma and Parks' 
creation. Because of the size and unique na- 
ture of the statue, it usually stays in one spot 
for an extended period of time. 

"They only move it on Sunday mornings 
because it can cause a traffic problem," ex- 
plained Gallio. 

One of the more appealing aspects of 
Marytown is that it remains open to the pub- 
lic 24 hours a day. This means residents can 
view the sculpture day or night, pray in front 
of it, or even take photos of this one-of-a- 
kind piece. 

Each day until Dec. 11, there will be a 
rosary parade and organized prayer at the 
statue. At 2 p.m., youth organizations and 
Catholic high schools wili conduct rosary and 
prayer services, and at 7 p.m. in Marytown's 




Conie 
Worship With Us 

A Dh'ectovy Of 
Antioch Area, Churches 




Graoeland Baptist Church. 258 Ida St., Antioch, IL 
Sunday School 1 1am., Morning Worship 1 1am., 
Sunday Evening 7pm. Robert Williams, Pastor. 

First Church of Christ, Scientist & Reading Rm. Ftte 173 and 
Harden, Antioch, Phone (847) 3&1 196. Sunday School, Sunday 
Church Service 10:30am, Wednesday, 7:30pm. 

Beautilul Savior Evangelical Lutheran Church. 554 Parkway, 
Antioch. Phone (847) 265-2450 Smday Worship a! 9am, Sunday 
School, High School & Mutl Bible Classes 10:30am 

Heritage Lutheran Church. Lindenhursl Civic Center, 1549 Old Elm 
Rd„ Lindenhursl (847) 356-1766. Sunday service 10.00 am, Sunday 
School & Bible Class 9,00 am (summer schedule • 9.00 am Sunday) 
Rev. Mark W. Anderson, pastor, 

St Ignatius Episcopal 977 Mail Si Phone (847) 3950652. Low Mass 
7:30am, tigfi Mass 9.30am Sunday School & Nursery 930am 

Antioch Evangelical Free Church. 750 Highview Of. Phone (847) 395- 
4117. Sunday Worship 8:15, 9:30 J 11:00am, Sunday School for an 
ages, inbnl thru aduit, 9:30ara Children's Church llamAwana.Youth, 
Women's Ministries, Men's Ministries, Growth Groups, Seniors. Senior 
Pastor David M.GfoIeau. 

St Stephen Lutheran Church (ELCA). 1 1 55 Hillside Ave. Phone (847) 
395*3359. Sunday Worship, 8 1 9:30am. Rev. Robert TrendeJ, Interim 
Pastor. 

Christian Life Fellowship Assemblies ol God Church. 41625 Deep 
Lake Rd, Antioch. Phone (647) 395-8572. Sunday Schod (al ages) 
9am, Sunday Morning Worship 10am, Children's Church 10am, 
Sunday Evening Worship 6:30pm, Wednesday Worship & ChMren's 
Program 7am, Tues. Women's FeBowsHp & Bible Study 9-1 1:30am 
Jeff Brussaly, Pastor. 



Faith Evangelical Lutheran. 1275 Main St, Phone 
(847) 395-1600. Sunday Worship 8 & 10:30am, Sunday School 
9:25am, Sal. 7pm, Rev. Gregory Hermanson, Pastor. Christian 
Day School (847) 395-1664. 

Millbum Congregational United Church of Christ. Grass Lake 
Rd. a! Rle. 45. Phone (847) 356-5237. Sunday Service 10am 
Children's Program 10am. Rev. Paul R. Meltzer, Pastor. 

United Melhodisl Church of Antioch. 848 Main SI Phcre (847) 
395-1259. Worship 8 30 4 10am, FeilowshipTime 930am, Sunday 
School 10am 

St Peter's Church. 557 W. Lake St., Antioch. Phone (847) 395- 
0274. Masses weekdays, 7:30am; Sunday 6:30, B, 9:30, 1 1.30am 
& Saturday 5:30pm. Rev. Father Ronald H. AngSim, Pastor. 

Chain of Lakes Community Bible Church. 23201 W. Grass Lake 
Rd, Antioch, Phone (847) 838-0103, Sunday Worship 8:15 and 11:00. 
Sunday School 9:45. Children's Church 10:45. Youth, Women's, Awana 
4 SmaTI Group ministries. Senior Paslor, Douglas G. Ffeterson. . 

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church [Missouri Synod). 25100 W. 
Grand Ave. (Rte. 59 & 132), Lake Villa. (847) 356-5158. Sunday 
Worship 8:15 & 10:45am; Sunday School (3 and up) and Bible 
Study 9:30am. Christian Preschool. Rev. John Zeilmer, Pastor. 

Lighthouse Church of Antioch 

554 Parkway Ave., Antioch, IL (847) 838-0616. Saturday Evening 
Service 7:00 p m. Adventure Club lor Kids, Adult Bible Study 
Saturday Evening 6:00 p.m. Monday Evening Bible Study 7:00 
p.m.Thufsday Evening PTSD Support Group 7:00 p.m. Senior 
Paslor Tom Bar Imer. 



Dan Dugenske, Director 

This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 






i, . - ^ ■ _-_ ■._■:_ — -*- r 



_'. " Tr -- _ " = 



Antioch firefighter Bob Johnson shows Cori Madriles, a senior at Antioch Commu- 
nity High School, how to use an air pack during a career shadowing day at the An- 
tioch Fire Dept.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



NEEDY 



chapel there will be organized rosaries and 
devotions in different languages each day in 
honor of the statue. 

"We expect larger crowds, especially as 
the word gets out," said Gallio. "People are al- 
ready responding to it." 

But where will a statue of this size be put 
permanently once it is finished touring? Be- 
lieve it or not, Libertyvillc's Marytown re- 
mains a possibility due to the amount of 
room available to house such a large sculp- 
ture. 

"Everybody here is praying for that," said 
Gallio. "We feel this would be an excellent 
spot — we have room for it." 

"It's something the people of LaJce Coun- 
ty really need to know is here," he added. 

For further information on Our Lady of 
the Millennium, or to view photos of it log on 
to the Internet at www.ourladyofthemillenni- 
um.com. Marytown is located on Rte. 176 on 
the west side of Libertyville. 



While about 150 children between the ages 
of 6 months and 18 years old will benefit from 
the sharing tree, the company is also hosting a 
general toy collection and food drive. "People- 
don't have to participate in the SharingTree to 
donate toys," said Shcehan. "They can simply 
drop offnew or like-new toys al Keller Williams 
by Dec. 15, and we will distribute them to local 
charitable organizations." 

The food drive will benefit the St. Peter's 
I : ood Pantry in Antioch and the Trevor Sharing 
Center in Trevor, Wis. Donations of non-per- 
ishable food will be received through Dec. 15. 

"The pantries often have enough food for 
holiday dinners, but supplies tend to get low 
during the winter. It's a very difficult time or 
year to collect food, so this food will be deliv- 
ered just after Christmas," Sheehan said. 

All donations are being accepted at the 
Keller Williams Stateiine Realty office at 132G 
Main St. (Rte. 83), three blocks south of Rte. 173. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

NOTICE FOR PROPOSED PROPERTY TAX 

INCREASE FOR GRASS LAKE SCHOOL 

DISTRICT 36 

I; A public hearing to approve a proposed 
property tax levy increase for 2000 will be held 
on December 12, 2000 at 7:00 p.m. at Grass 
Lake School, 26177 W. Grass Lake Road, 
Antioch, Illinois 60002. 

Any person desiring to appear at the pub- 
lic hearing and present testimony to the taxing 
district may contact Mr. James Beveridge, 
Superintendent, 27177 W. Grass Lake Road, 
Antioch, Illinois 60002. 

II. The corporate and special purpose prop- 
erty taxes for 1999 were $1,48^092.05. The 
proposed corporate and special purpose prop- 
erty taxes to be levied for 2000 are 
$1,819,014. This represents a 21% increase 
over the previous year. 

III. The property taxes extended for debt ser- 
vice and public building commission leases for 
1 999 were -0-. 

The estimated property taxes to be levied 
for debt service and public building commis- 
sion leases for 2000 are -0-. This represents a 
0% increase over the previous year. 

IV. The total property taxes extended for 
^1999 were $1 ,481 ,092.05. The estimated total 

property taxes to be levied for 2000 are 
$1 ,819,014 before the tax cap. This represents 
a 21% increase over the previous year. 
Grass Lake School District #36 
November 30, 2000 

1200A-3742-AN 
December 1, 2000 













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COMMUNITY 



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100 years and counting 

Ida (Runyard) Kufalk has just about seen it all 



By JUUE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 



Ida (Runyard) Kufalk has about 
seen it ail in her 100 years of 
. life from the development of 
automobiles and insulin to 
airplanes and e-mail. She still has 
more vivacity than many half of her 
age and keeps up with current 
events. 

She turns 100 years old on Dec. 
9 and hopes the country will have a 
definite president-elect by that 
time. She's lived under 18 presi- 
dents beginning with the 25th pres- 
ident William McKinley who was 
assassinated while in office in 1901. 

"I'm kind of disgusted (with this 
election)," said Kufalk. "Are we go- 
ing to have a president this year? I 
think Gore is kind of a hard loser," 

Whether there's a president or ' 
not, nothing is going to put a 
damper on the birthday party being 
held for this spirited centenarian on 
the anniversary of her birth. The af- 
fair will be an open house held from 
noon-3 p.m. in the great room of 
the Libertyville Manor where Kufalk 
now resides. 

"I was told I just get to start over 
at 100," said Kufalk. "The ladies tell 
mc I should just throw all of my old 
clothes away, and get new ones — 
but I like the ones 1 have." 

Kufalk has lived in Antioch all 
her life until last year when she de- 
cided to give assisted living a try. 
"After my husband (Roy Ku falk) 
died, I lived on my own and always 
cooked my own meals," said Kufalk, 



adding that she likes her private 
room at the manor complete with a 
small refrigerator for her Pepsi and 
grapefruit juice. 

Her parents, Robert and Alma 
Runyard, had moved from Long 
Lake to a house across the street 
from Emmons School so that Ida 
and her two brothers Robert and 
Melvin wouldn't have to walk 
through woods inhabited by wolves 
to get to school. 

She remembers when cars and 
paved roads were scarce. "One doc- 
tor in town used to have a Ford 
(adding later that Fords were the 
only cars at the time). If we heard it, 
we'd run outside so that we could 
see it coming," said Kufalk. 

In 1914 her parents got their 
first car. "People used to come over 
to our place on Sunday for dinner 
and then we'd drive over on Grand 
Ave. outside of Waukcgan to drive 
on the 1 mile of paved (concrete) 
road." 

Kufalk said her uncles used to 
argue about whether all roads 
would one day be paved. "Uncle Art 
(Runyard) would say, 'One day 
they're going to pave all the roads 
from here to California.' Uncle Fred 
(Runyard) would say, 'Oh no they 
won't."' 

Kufalk graduated from Antioch 
Community High School in 1919 as 
Ida Runyard. She was part of the 
first class to spent all four years at 
the high school that was opened in 
1915. After graduation, she took a 
summer course to receive her 
teaching certificate and began 



teaching full-time that fall for $60 a 
month. 

Kufalk said that teaching 
brought her a lot of satisfaction. She 
taught grade school both prior to 
marriage and after raising a family, 
finally retiring in 1962. "There was 
never a long day. On the whole, I 
loved it." 

She married her husband Roy 
on Dec. 27, 1926, He had been em- 
ployed with the post office since 
Oct. 16 of the same year, after work- 
ing to help and support his parents 
for years. Kufalk said, "We got mar- 
ried at Christmastime, because that 
was when I had some time off of 
work," 

They were married for 50 years 
when he died in 1977. 

Though her parents had given 
the couple some farm property on 
which to build a house, they ended 
up moving into town. The house 
had been located at the corner of 
Lake and Main streets, but has 
since been moved to Victoria St. 
where it still stands. Kufalk still 
owns it and rents it out. 

Kufalk reads 5-7 books every 
three weeks. Her new favorite is 
"Washington Goes to War" by 
David Brinkley. She said, "This is 
the best book— it's just like talking 
to him." 

Other longtime hobbies of Ku- 
falk include playing cards and cro- 
cheting. Of crocheting she said, 
"You should learn how to do this. 
You'll have some time one day to sit 
and do some things like this." 

The secret to living to be 100 




Ida Kufalk, who turns 100 on Dec. 9, recalls some of the major 
world events that have occurred during her lifetime. Kufalk, who 
lived most of her life in Antioch, now resides at Liberty Manor in 
Libertyville.-— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



years old, according to Kufalk, is 
"No tobacco and no drinks. The 
only alcohol I've ever had is licking 
off the spoon after putting vanilla in 
the cake." 

She also says she tries to be 
happy. "I try to make the best of 
things." 



Everyone is invited to the open 
house party on Dec. 9 in the great 
room of Libertyville Manor located 
at 610 W. Peterson Rd. (Rte. 137) in 
Libertyville, 60048, from noon-3 
p.m. For those unable to attend, 
cards can be mailed to Kufalk at the 
manor. 



Breakfast with Santa 
planned for Dec. 5 



By JUUE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter, 



The Grass Lake School PTO is 
hosting its annual breakfast with 
Santa and having a craft sale on Dec. 
3 from 9 a.m.-l p.m. at the school lo- 
cated on Grass Lake Rd. 

"This is at least the fifth year 
we've had the pancake breakfast," 
said parent volunteer Donna Math- 
ias. The breakfast is all-you-can-eat 
pancakes and sausage, with Santa 
available for children to share their 
wish lists. 

Over 30 craftcrs will be partici- 
pating at the craft sale, Raffles will be 
field giving items donated from each 
of the crafters as well as from local 



businesses that have contributed to 
thePTO. '■ 

The Gingerbread Shop and San- 
ta's Rake Shop will be open for the 
occasion. The bake shop will feature 
homemade goodies such as cookies, 
bread, cupcakes and full-size cakes. 

Children can shop the Ginger- 
bread shop for gifts for relatives. "All 
of the items sell for between 25 cents 
and $5," said Malhias. "The items 
arc put in gift bags, and we give the 
kids some wrapping paper so they 
can wrap their own presents." 

. The cost of the pancake breakfast 
is $4 for adults, $2 for children under 
12 years old and seniors, and free to 
children under 2 years old. Families of 
four or more can eat for S10. 



Hearing held for Dist. 117 tax levy 

Board approves 15.69 percent increase 



By JUUE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 



Antioch Community High 
School (ACHS) Dist. 1 17 held a pub- 
lic hearing about the tax levy for the 
next school year, but the public opt- 
ed not to attend. 

Business manager Bill Ahlers 
said, "In the last four years, nobody 
has had a comment. Maybe it's be- 
cause nobody really understands the 
process, or maybe it's that everybody 
understands that this just has to be 



done in a certain way." 

Supt. Dennis Hockney con- 
firmed that there hasn't been a pub- 
lic comment on this issue since he 
has held the position of superinten- 
dent. 

The board of education ap- 
proved a tax levy of slightly more 
than $14.84 million, a 15.69 percent 
increase over the current year. 

Ahlers said, "The setting of the 
tax levy for next year's operational 
funds with the tax cap is a match of 
strategy. I say that because whatever 



the assessments are (on property) is 
what we will get." 

"We deliberately inflate the 
amount of money we ask for, and 
the county tax extension office 
brings it into balance when the as- 
sessed valuations come in next 
spring," said Ahlers. "When it's alt 
said and done, we'll probably get 6 
percent." 

"In years past, this was a really 
important meeting for the public to 
attend," said Ahlers. "Now with the 
tax cap, it's just not necessary." 



A great start to holiday season 



INDEX 

AutoMarket See Insert Editorial B4 Hot Spots 116 

Christmas Memories .See Insert Healthwatch B6 Kid's Komer UH 

Classified 812 Home & Garden 1110 Lakelife , .....Ill 

County i Bl Home Marketer See Insert Movies US 

Crossword .„ ..,.119 Horoscope 119 Obituaries „.B9 

GET CONNECTED-Look for us on the Internet at WWW.LAKEtANDMEDIA.COM 



Antioch News 

Vol. 115 No. 48 A Lakeland Newspaper Founded 1886 



McrrtMrof in.nl ii Pi mi Aaaoc. 

Look for us on the internet at 
WWW.LPNEWS.COM 



(USPS 027-080) Ed^ioti*. 

30 South Whitney St.. Grayslake. IL 60030 
(847)223-8161 

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Antioch has some great 
traditions to kick off the 
holiday season that really 
enhance the spirit of the 
season. 

The First National Bank-Em- 
ployee Owned (FNBEO) and the 
Antioch Movie Theater collected 
about 200 cans and boxes of non- 
perishable food for the Antioch 
Food Pantry the showing of "Stuart 
Little." 

Karen Kubin, marketing direc- 
tor at FNBEO said the theater was 
about 75 percent full. "I think the 
kids really enjoy being able to have 
their parents drop them off so they 
can go to the movie by themselves. 
That's as good as the movie itself." 

That same day, children had 
the option of going to see a live 
magic act sponsored by the Antioch 
Chamber of Commerce and Indus- 
try at PM&L Theatre. 

According to volunteer Stan 
Livermore, there were 06 people in 
attendance, and the effort brought 
about another 200 cans and boxes 
of food for the Antioch Food 
Pantry. 




OUR 
TOWN 



' Julie Murphy 



My daughter being one of the 
86 in attendance, I can vouch for 
what a fun and entertaining experi- 
ence Magic Dave provided. Giggles 
and belly busters came from the 
audience as he performed his slight 
of hand laced with humor silenced 
at the grand finale when he levitat- 
ed a little girl from the audience. 

There are two places in town 
collecting new, unwrapped toys for 
the less fortunate through mid-De- 
cember. 

The Antioch VFW Sequoit Post 
4551 is accepting toys for the U.S. 
Marine Reserve "Toys for Tots" 
program. The toys can be brought 
to the post located at 75 North Ave. 
from 9 a.m.-noon on Monday 



through Friday, and on Tuesday 
evenings between 4-9:30 p.m. 

For more information, call 395- 
5395 or 395-6934. 

Keller Williams Stateline Realty 
is having both a general toy drive, 
and their annual "SharingTree" 
that has specific individual gift 
wishes of children from the Central 
Baptist Children's Home in Lake 
Villa, and the Allendale Association 
Specialized Foster Care in Bristol, 
Wis. 

Cards from the sharing tree can 
be picked up, and toys dropped off 
at the realty located at 1326 Main 
St. (Rte. 83) three blocks south of 
Rte. 173. 

For more information call 395- 
3737. 

Keller Williams is also collect- 
ing food at this location for the St 
Peter's Food Pantry. 

If you have interesting informa- 
tion or anecdotes to submit for "Our 
Toum " call staff reporter Julie Mur~ 
phy at 223-8161, ext. 600 or 
e-mail, jm urphy@lakelandmedia. 
com 



1 



I 



A4 /Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



December 1,2000 




Clare Horton, originally of Antioch, celebrates her 98th birthday with Ruth Hick- 
man of Ladies Auxiliary Post 4551 at Victory Lakes Continuing Care Center in Lin- 
denhurst.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 

Women's auxiliary hosts 
surprise party for member 



By JULIE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 



Eleven ladies from the Women's Auxiliary 
of Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Sequoit 
Post 4551 held a surprise birthday party for life- 
time member Clare Horton who turned 98 
years old. 

The women's auxiliary presented Horton 
with a musical globe. Auxiliary president Ruth 
Ann Oerly said, "We didn't want to make too 
hard for her — the excitement adds a lot of 
stress when you're older. We just thought we'd 
talk to her and hug her, and let her know we 
lovelier." 



Oerly said she and the other women in the 
auxiliary are proud of Horton and her long track 
record. "She was married for 75 years at the time 
of her husband's death. We think that's a pretty 
good stretch." Horton and her husband Floyd 
both lived in Antioch all of their lives. 

Floyd Horton served in World War 1 and 
was the Stale of Illinois' oldest living veteran at 
the time he died at the age of 105 years old. 
That same year, he was honored with the 
French Foreign Legion Award given to WW1 
vets who helped to liberate France. 

VFW post commander Bill Oerly said, "We 
are checking to see. We think Clare might be 
die oldest living auxiliary member in the state." 



Dist. 54, 117 audits OR 



By JULIE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 



John Eder, a member of the firm Eder, 
Casella and Company reviewed the audits of 
both Antioch Community Consolidated School 
Dist. 34 and Antioch Community High School 
Dist, 117. According to Eder, the records in 
both cases arc in good shape. 

In the case of the high school, a $4.3 mil- 
lion deficit is shown due to capital projects and 
construction projects. The elementary district, 
on the other hand, shows an excess of $3.3 mil- 
lion. In both cases Eder said the numbers are 
somewhat skewed because of one-lime things 
that appear on the budget. 

Eder was pleased with the changeover 
from an accrual to a cash basis budget for Dist. 
34. The district went to cash budget because it 
is easier to understand 



He added, "The records are in excellent 
shape. The transition with the new business 
manager and the new superintendents was 
very smooth." 

Eder warned die high school district to pay 
attention to its educational fund. "I am hesitant 
to give an opinion looking at the past, and not 
looking loward the future, hut," he said, "a 
5600,000 deficiency jumps out at me." 

Education board member Wayne Sobczak 
asked, "When you say to be careful about the 
ed fund, are you saying to be careful about how 
we analyze what this says, or are you saying to 
be careful in the future?" 

Eder replied, "He careful in the future. With 
the size of the budget you have, it's really nut 
(hat big (of a deficit)." 

He concluded thai the records are in good 
shape and said, "Bill (Ahlers, business manag- 
er) and his staff have been very cooperative; 



Theater finishes run of 'Curious 
Savage,' 'Sprucey' to open Dec. 9 



By JULIE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 



The last weekend to see "The Curious Sav- 
age" is Dec. 1-3 with Friday and Saturday 
shows at 8 p.m., and a matinee Sunday at 2:30 
p.m. 

This warm comedy was wrilten by John 
Patrick and is being directed by Tom Hausman. 
For reservations, call 395-3055. 

"Sprucey, the Blue Christmas Tree" writ- 
ten by Antioch resident Donna Abear is being 
directed by Gigi Willding from Inglesidc. It 
begins Dec. 9 and will run weekends through 
Dec. 17. 

There will be two performances on both 
Saturdays and Sundays, with Saturday show- 
times at noon and 2 p.m., and Sunday show- 
times at 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. 



The play centers on a homeless family and 
its son who finds Sprucey, a magical Christmas 
tree that brings good luck, and renews the fam- 
ily's faith. The play runs approximately 45 min- 
utes. 

Cast members for this production are Sum- 
mie Mohr, ZackSimonini and Tom Hausman 
of Antioch; Charles Brown of Waukegan; 
Courtney and Liz Willding of Inglesidc; and 
Larry Bersic of Stiver Lake, Wis. 

Ticket prices are $4 for children and S5 for 
adults. Those bringing a non-perishable food 
item will receive $1 off the ticket price. 

Food items will be donated to the Antioch 
Food Pantry. Cash proceeds from the show will 
go to the Lake County PADS program to help 
homeless families. 

For more information, or lo make reserva- 
tions, call 395-3055. 
















■ 



LOCAL DIGEST 



CPR 



The Antioch Rescue Squad and Fire De- 
partment will be offering CPR classes to 
the public on the second and fourth 
Wednesdays of each month at 6 p.m. 
Classes will be held at the Fire Department 
located at 835 Holbek Dr. There is a 
$5/$15 fee per person, depending on the 



class needed. Payable at the time of the 
class. For information call the Antioch Fire 
Dept. at 395-5511. 

Meals on Wheels 
volunteers needed 

Meals on Wheels is seeking volunteers 



to deliver hot noon meals to homebound 
senior citizens in the Antioch area. Whether 
once a month, once a week, or daily, help is 
need. Contact Paul Howard at the Antioch 
Senior Center 395-7120. 



Community telecare 

Community Telecare off.?rs a daily 
phone check up service for those who live 
alone or are shut-In. To sign up Tor this ser- 
vice, please contact Mary 395-0762. 



LAKEL 



NEWSPAPERS 



SUBSCRIBE 
TODAY! 



245-7500 



Irairicia 7 s 

Furniture 
Gift ware 

i41055 N. Route 83 
Antioch, Illinois 
(847) 395-4886 



"Simply The Best You Can Buy" 




Lake County's Best 
Amish Furniture Dealer 




Free Adoption Seminar 

Anyone contemplating adoption should 
attend this informational seminar 

Wednesday, December 6, 2000 7:00 p.m. 

Family Counseling Clinic 
505 Haw-Icy Road • Mimdclcln, Illinois 

Infants and toddlers available from: 
China, Poland, Vietnam, Bulgaria, Russia, India and Guatemala 

Space is limited, please call 847-566-7293 to register 
or for more information ask for Gtnny Mann. 



i i I ~ i ^m n i if i r ^■fla* 'i^ ' ■ - • .... - .... — _=...■■ 










The holiday season is typically a time for serious shortages in the blood supply. 

Plus, increases in accidents and other cold weather injuries/illnesses create a high demand 

for blood and blood products. Help provide the gift of blood to those in need. 

• Community Blood Drive • 

Wednesday, December 6 • 11 a.m.-7 p.m. 

at the Victory Surgery and Treatment Center 

1050 Red Oak Lane • Lindenhurst, Illinois 

(on the Victory Lakes Campus, off Grand Avenue) 

Cosponsored by the Village of Lindenhurst. 




all 1-888-869-1 11 8 to make an appointment. Walk-in donations also accepted, 



Those physically cliallenged and/or in need of an ASL interpreter may contact us up to one week before a community program 
to determine how we can facilitate their attendance, Tenemos disponiblcs los serviebs de traduccidn al Espahol, 



M Provena 

Kaini "Jhrrrw Medical Center 



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December 1, 2000 



COMMUNITY 



Lakeland Newspapers/ AS 



Underage Grayslake drinking party nets 14 arrests 



By MICHELLE HABRYCH 
Staff Reporter 



Grayslake Police arrested 14 people at an 
apartment party after a complaint of loud noise 
was received Nov. 25 at 1 2:28 a.m. . 

leremy M. Stegmtller, 22,;of 1815 Country 
Dr. Apt. 204, and Kyle J; Graves'; 19, of the same 
address, were charged with contributing to mi- 
nor consumption of alcohol, attempted ob- 
struction of justice, unlawful permit of minor 
intoxication and unlawful delivery of alcohol to 
minors, when police broke up an underage 
drinking party at their apartment. 



The men were each released on $1,000 I- 
bond and are scheduled to appear in court Jan. 
8. 

Also arrested was Robert K. Scisson, 19, 270 
Danburry Dr. in Vernon Hills, for possession of 
drug paraphernalia and underage consump- 
tion of alcohol. He was released on $1,000 1- 
bond and is scheduled to appear in court Dec. 
19. 

Eleven subjects were arrested for unlawful 
consumption of alcohol by a minor: Rachel M. 
Aspinall, 18, of 307 Alexandria Dr. in Vernon 
Hills, was released on a notice to appear and 
has a court date of Dec. 20; Dorothy Dabrows- 



Id, 18, of 1 102 Loyola Dr. in Libertyville, was re- 
leased on a notice to appear and has a court 
date of Jan. 17; Molly Meredith; 18, of 1125 
Trevor Circle in Libertyville, was released on a 
notice to appear and has a court date of Jan. 17; 
Kristine E. Matzke, 18, of 1695 Templeton Ct. 
in Mundelein, was released on a notice to ap- 
pear and has a court date of Jan. 17; Shana E. 
Collins, 18, of 6248 Formoor Ln. in Gurnee, was 
released on a notice to appear and has a court 
date of Jan. 17; Charles J. Genest, 20, 14825 W. 
Old Rockland Rd. in Libertyville, was released 
on $ 1 ,000 1-bond and given a court date of Dec. 
19; Justin A. Payton, 19, of 25824.93rd SL in 



Salem, Wis., was released on $1,000 1-bond and 
has a court date of Dec. 19; Brandon Hickey, 18, 
of 404 W. Golf Rd. in Libertyville, was released 
on $1,000 1-bond and has a court date of Dec. 
19; Daniel Yob, 18, 1311 Brandywine Rd. in 
Libertyville, was released on $1,000 1-bond and 
has a court date of Dec. 19; Ryan Eiserman, 19, 
of 300 Almond in Vernon Hills, was released on 
$1,000 1-bond and has a court date of Dec. 19; 
Brandon Harpe, 19^ of 203 Arron Ct in Vemon 
Hills, was released on $1,000 1 -bond and has a 
court date of Dec. 19; Martin Ferrara, 18, of 347 
Sutcliffe Circle in Vemon Hills, was released on 
$100 cash bond and has a court date of Dec. 19. 



POLICE BEAT 



LINDENHURST 



ANTIOCH 



Persons clitirgeit with it irhnrnre intmevnt until phnvii guilty in n court uflnw.- 



firmed through LEADS/NCIC. 

He was issued citations for disobeying a 
no passing zone, and for driving while re- 
voked. He was released on a recognizance 
bond pending his Dec. 20 court date. 



Suspended driver's license 

Leena A. Coleman, 19, of 23368 VV. Lake 
Shore Dr. in Antioch, was arrested for dri- 
ving with a suspended driver's license on 
Nov. 27 at 12:27 p.m. at the intersection of 
Rtc. 1 73 and Tiffany Rd. 

She was stopped for not having tags on 
her rear registration plate. Her identifiers 
were checked through LEADS and came 
back as suspended in Illinois, and having no 
valid license in Wisconsin. 

She was issued citations for improper 
registration, and fordriving while suspend- 
ed. She was released on proper bond pend- 
ing her Dec. 13 court date. 

Michael W. Hey, 19, of 2330 74th Court 
in HI m wood; was arrested for driving while 
suspended at the intersection of North Ave. 
and Trevor Rd. on Nov. 22 at 1 1:59 p.m. 

1 tc was stopped when police locked him 
traveling 47 mph in a 30 mph zone. His 
identifiers were run through LEADS/NCIC 
and came back as suspended. 

He was issued citations for driving while 
suspended and for speeding. He was re- ' 
leased on persona! recognizance pending 
his Dec. 27 court date. 

No valid driver's license 

Abel Vazquez, 27, of 931 Commonwealth 
Ave. in Waukegan, was arrested for driving 
without a valid driver's license on Nov. 23 at 
1 1:04 a.m. as he traveled northbound on Rte. 
83 approaching Rtc. 173. 

Police locked him traveling 44 mph in a 
30 mph zone. Vazquez told police he had nei- 
ther a license nor insurance. His identifiers 
were checked through LEADS/NCIC coming 
back with nothing on record. 

He was issued citations for speeding, no 
valid driver's license and for operating an 
uninsured vehicle. He was released on bond 
pending court. 

Driving on revoked license 

Warren A. Nichols, 39, of 1 1236 288th 
Ave in Trevor, Wis., was arrested for driving 
with a revoked driver's license on Nov. 24 at 
noon on Main St. at the Walgreen's en- 
trance. 

Police observed him pass four vehicles 
in a no passing zone. Nichols told police his 
license was revoked, and that was con- 



CRIMESTOPPERS 



Crimestoppcrs and the Antioch Police are 
seeking information regarding a burglary to 
residence. 

Between the hours of 9 a.m. and 10 p.m. on 
Nov. 9 unknown offenders broke into a resi- 
dence in Antioch and were subsequently at- 
tacked by a large dog belonging to the home- 
owner. A substantial amount of blood was 
found at the scene, which indicates the offend- 
ers received serious bite wounds. No property 
was removed during the break-in. Any infor- 
mation leading to the identification of the of- 
fenders would be greatly appreciated. 

The police would like to remind everyone 
to call when suspicious activity is observed and 
to not try to confront suspicious subjects your- 
self. 

If you have any information about this 
crime or any other felony crime or felony fugi- 
tive contact Crlmestoppers at 662-2222. 

If your information leads to an arrest you 
could be eligible for a cash reward of up to 
$1,000. 

Crimestoppcrs wants your information — 
not your name. 



DUI 

Deborah L O'Dell, 46, of 4 1 044 N. West 
Lake Ave. in Antioch, was arrested for driving 
under the influence of alcohol on Rte. 59 
south of Bowles Rd. on Nov. 19 at 3:02 a.m. 

Police saw her vehicle cross the white 
fog line, and further observed that she had 
no rear registration plate lights. While talk- 
ing to O'Dell, police smelled the strong odor 
of alcohol on her breath and requested she 
exit the car for sobriety tests. 

She failed to successfully complete the 
sobriety testing. She was transported to the 
Antioch Police Dept. and put through book- 
ing procedures and issued citations for im- 
proper lane usage, no rear registration plate 
lights, driving under the influence of alcohol 
and operating an uninsured vehicle. 

She refused all chemical testing, and was 
released on bond pending her Dec. 12 court 
date. 



Theft of mislaid property 

Domingo Rios, 22, of 1322 Melrose in 
Round Lake Beach, was arrested on Nov. 22 at 
3 p.m. for theft of mislaid property. 

Police responded to a call to Taco Bell 
where the victim returned to retrieve a purse 
that had accidentally left behind that she 
claims had $700 in cash and an American Ex- 
press card. Police viewed the store's video 
surveillance, but the purse had been in a loca- 
tion outside of the camera's view. 

The purse was found in a clear plastic 
garbage bag mixed with other trash in the 
dumpster out back. The manager said that 
Rios was the only employee who had worked 
the floor, and who had taken out the garbage. 

Rios agreed to come to the station for 
questioning! It was determined through the 
interviews that Rios had taken and dumped 
the purse. He denied taking the money and 
the American Express card, but did admit to 
taking the purse. 

He was charged with theft of mislaid 
property. 



LAKE VILLA 



No valid driver's license 

Maria M. Gonzalez, 22, of 1426 N. 



Woodridge in Round Lake, was arrested on 
Nov. 28 at 334 p.m. for driving without a valid 
driver's license at the intersection of Cedar 
Lake Rd. and Monaville Rd. 

Police saw her fail to stop at a stop sign 
and pulled her over. She had neither a valid 
driver's license nor proof of insurance. 

She was arrested and issued citations for 
disobeying a stop sign, no valid driver's li- 
cense and for no proof of insurance. 

She was released on bond pending her 
Dec. 13 court date. 

Adrian Villa, 18, of 1534 Park Rd. in 
Round Lake Park, was arrested for driving 
without a valid driver's license on Nov. 25 at 
8:36 p.m. at the intersection of Rte. 132 and 
Cedar Lake Rd. 

Police stopped Villa's car for not having 
taillights. Villa told police that he had no li- 
cense, but did have proof of insurance. 

He was issued citations for driving with 
no valid driver's license and for having no 
taillights. He was released on a personal rec- 
ognizance bond. 

Danielle C. Little, 31, of 1814 16th SL in 
North Chicago, was arrested on Nov. 24 at 
1052 p.m. for driving without a valid driver's li- 
cense at the comer of Rte. 132 and Fairfield Rd. 

She was issued a citation for driving with- 
out a valid driver's license. A court date of 
Dec. 13 has been set 





Golf Club 



Gome join us 
Christmas Bash 
Brass Ball Ba 



r a 
with the 
nqers ! 



Raffle for Weekly This special Christmi 
i i . . Party will be 



Golf Club & other y.oopm to 10:30pm 

raffle prizes! in the beautiful decorated Grand M 
V A11 you can eat buffet and dessert table for only $16.00 per person. 



uUtHW 




For Reservations CALL (847) 395-4800 

' ANTIOCH GOLF CLUB 

40150 N. Route 59 • Antioch, IL 
Book your holiday parties now. 

I UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 





Put your best foot 

Forward! 

Jeffrey J. Hicks, D.P.M. 

Foot and Ankle Specialist 



Now open in Waterford Commons 

Off Grasslake Road 

Lindenhurst, IL 60046 

847-245-4601 

Welcome 
new patients! 

Dr. Jeffery Hicks 




| Because your 

chrome is your castle, 
protect it with 

Executive 
V.I.R 

Homeowners 
Protection 

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home 

The discerning homeowner 
will appreciate the complete 
coverages available on the 
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Policy from Pekin Insurance. 
Call today to see if you qualify 
for this exciting plan with a 
cost-saving $500 deductible 
standard and many other 
attractive features. 

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Service, ltd. 

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P.O. Box 635 
Antioch, IL 60002 

847-395-2500 

Fax: 847-395-9277 

www.osmondinsurance.com 



^PEKINy 



Depend on your 

hometown 

professionals 



' 



A6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



December 1,2000 



WHAT'S NEW AT THE LIBRARY 

Shadows of a Princess: An Intimate Account by her Private Secretary 

ByP.D. Jeplison, Patrick Jeplison and John Smith 

In 198 1, Lady Diana Spencer was destined 
, to ascend the British throne, innocent 
young wife to the future King Charles HI. 
With her beauty, modesty and charitable 
good works, she seemed the perfect addition to 
bring the royal family into the 21st century. 
Instead, she brought a revolution. 
Twenty years later, the comforting illusion of 
royalty as we knew it is gone forever. Diana is 
dead, the Windsors marginalised and a chas- 
tened prince faces the dilemma of being a very 
different sort of king than his people expected. 
But what does it mean to be royal? Thrown into 
her role with little background for it, Diana 
learned the hard way. This book goes further 
than any other in exploring Diana's growth, 
from innocent schoolgirl to sometimes-cynical 
member of the world's most royal family. 

No one knows more about Princess Diana's 
struggles than the author, Diana's closest aide 
and advisor during her years of greatest public 
fame and deepest personal crisis. Rooted in first- 
hand experience, "Shadows of a Princess" is the 
most authoritative, balanced account we will 
ever have of the woman who became an icon, 
yet remains a contradictory enigma. Viewed 

from behind the scenes during eight relentless years, this is the princess in all her disguises, as 
we have never seen her before. It is the story of shifting loyalties, self-delusion and shattered 
hope-of defiance and wasted opportunities. But it is also a story of the laughter and optimism 
that were the hallmark of Diana's alternate court and a tantalizing glimpse of what might have 
been. 



SHADOWS 

PF A 

PRINCESS 

AN INTIMATE ACCOUNT BY 



1 1 1: R I'KlVAil: M-.CRI-IAKY 



P. D. JEPHSON 



BIOGRAPHIES/AUTOBIOGRAPHIES 



973.922092 ONASSIS 

America's Queen 
Sarah Bradford 

782.4264092 COLE 

Angel on My Shoulder 
Natalie Cole 

811.54 KARR 

Cherry: A Memoir 
MaryKarr 

813.54 HIC 

Coalwood Way 
Homer], Hickam 



796.357092 DI MAGGIO 

Joe DiMaggio: A Hero's Life 
Richard Ben Cramer 

845.5106092 MACH IAVELLI 

Niccolo's Smile: A Biography of Machiavelli 
Maurizio Viroli 

,941.085092 DIANA 
Shadows o I a Princess 

Patrick Jeultson 




A Holiday Happening! 

Victory Lakes' 13th Annual 

Festival of Arts and Crafts 

Saturday, December 2, 2000 
$ 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. $ 

at the Victory Lakes Continuing Care Center 






1055 East Grand Avenue • Lindenhurst 

We'll have American Girl' 11 clothing, nutcrackers, 

clocks, stained glass, leather crafts, clothing, jewelry, 

toys, Beanie Babies™. Santas and snowmen galore 

and much, much more available for purchase! 

Light luncheon available. 

Call (847) 356-5900 for details. 




Victory. takes 
Continuing 
Care; Center 



7 miles west ofRt. 94 \AjfjUated with Victory Health Services 




In the holiday spirit 

Three-year-old Tanner Devore of Antioch enjoys petting Santa's reindeer during his 
visit to Santa's castle on Toft Ave. The castle is open Monday through Friday from 
5:30-8 p.m., and on the weekend from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Helpers from the Antioch 
Women's Club are available to take pictures at a cost of $5. Proceeds are used 
for castle upkeep and to help fund high school scholarships given by the club. — 
Photo by Julie Murphy 



Museum decorated for holidays 



By JUUE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 



The Lakes Region Historical Society Mu- 
seum is ready Tor the holiday season with six 
Christmas trees decorated throughout the 
museum including a tree with candles in the 
Victorian room and an elaborate tree deco- 
rated by the Garden Club, 

"All of our Christmas trees are up and 
decorated for the holidays. It's nice for peo- 
ple to be able to come in and see the muse- 
um with its additional decorations," said his- 
torical society president Dob Undblad. 



While the museum will be open on Sat- 
urdays through December, it will be closed 
for the months of January and February, ex- 
cept for specially arranged tours. 

According to Lindblad, the historical so- 
ciety will use that time to catalog items in the 
museum, as well as for general upkeep. He 
said, "When the weather gets bad, atten- 
dance drops off. It's a good time for us to get 
a iot of the little stuff done, like to clean up 
and catalog things." 

Those needing more information about 
museum hours or about arranging a tour 
should call the museum at 395-7337. 



HM C K I E 



Your Holiday Will 

Be Wony-Free 

When You Have 

"Our Service Professionals" YOUr Car SeiYICed 

sMKEtmnwmmuTH, At Sandy McKie 



FOX LAKE, I'L 



FIVE STAR 



CHRYSLER. 
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December 1,2000 



NEIGHBORS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A7 



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By JUUE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 



The AnUoch Community Chorus promis- 
es to bring "good tidings of great joy" when it 
presents "The Messiah" by G. F. Handel at the 
sanctuary of St. Peter Catholic Church located 
at 557 Lake St. in Antioch on Dec. 10 at 7:30 
p.m. 

"This performance sets the pace of Christ- 
mas for me," said Mabel Lou Weber who is on 
the Festival Arts of Antioch committee that 
sponsors the chorus. "It is always very moving 
and very inspirational." 

This year Ralph Brooke of Antioch will di- 
rect the concert. Soloists include soprano Jen- 
nifer Layman of Waukegan, contralto Cynthia 
Mace of Lake Forest, tenor Brent Billock of 
Chicago and bass Alex Honzen of Chicago. Pi- 
anist Chris Kusher of Grayslake and the Tim 
Montalvo string quintet will company the cho- 
rus. 

According to Weber, this program has 
been done since the late 60s or early 70s, arid 
will last about 45 minutes. As with all perfor- 
mances of the Antioch Community Choir, ad- 
mission is free and open to anyone. For more 
information, call 395-1333. 

The Festival Arts of Antioch has presented 
cultural and entertaining performances to the 
community for many years. In addition to the 
help it offers the Antioch Community Chorus, 
it also helps to support the Lakes Area Com- 
munity Band. Festival Arts is in turn support- 
ed by area businesses and individuals. 

With the completion of the William E 
Brook 1 Entertainment Center, Festival Arts an- 
ticipates additional performances of a variety of 
art forms throughout the 2001 summer season. 

"Some people don't want to donate to a 
religious group," said Weber. "Not everything 
we do is religious, and we're not affiliated with 
a church." 

For more information about Festival Arts 
of Antioch, contact Mabel Lou Weber at 265- 
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NEIGHBORS 




Name: Jennifer Gallimore 

Home: AnUoch 

Occupation: Works at J.J. Blinkers 

I'm originally from: Antioch. 

I graduated from: Antioch Community High School. 

My family consists of: My mom, my brother Jeff and 
his wife Cindy,' Julie, Jerry, and my husband Bob. 

My pets are: A golden retriever named Rusty. 

What I like best about my town: It's a small commu- 
nity with a down-home feeling. 

The secret to my success: You've got to laugh a lot. 

I relax by: Lighting the candles, putting my feet up and reading a book. 

My perfect day in Antioch would be: A sunny, crisp fall day. 

Last book I read: "Irish Hearts" by Nora Roberts 

Favorite TV show is: "Touched by an Angel" 

Favorite movie: "Singing in the Rain" 

Favorite band or musician: Jo Dec Messina 

Favorite restaurant: Reflections on Deep Lake Rd. 

My life's motto is: Roll with the punches. 

If I won the lottery: All of my friends would be rich. 

My greatest accomplishments are: I'm happy with myself and my life. I love my 
husband. I wouldn't change a thing. 

I want to be remembered as: A loving person who cares about others. 

People who knew me in high school would say: They would say, "Jennifer 
who?" 

My pet peeve is: Stupid people. 

Most interesting person I ever met was: Joanne Linker— it's just her. 

If I had a plane ticket anywhere, I would go to: Arizona to see my mom. 

If you have a "Neighbor" that you would like to see profiled in this colum n, call Lake- 
land Newspapers at 223-81 61 . 



www.lakelandmedia.com 

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Calendar 



Friday, December 1 

7-10 p.rrw, Hootenanny Folk Singing 
pthering held in theAnderson Arts Center, 
121 66th At. in Kenosha. Anyone who plays 
art acoustic folk instrument or just likes to 
sing is, welcome. Donations suggested. For 
information, call (262) 654-6840 

7:30 p.m. ■ Lake County Camera Club meets 
at Warren Twp. Center Citizen Bldg. on 
Washington St. in Gumee, call 856-1583 

Fri. & Sat. at 8 p.m., Sun. 2:30 p.m., "The 
Curious Savage" performed at PM&L 
Theatre, 877 Main St. tn Antioch. Tickets 
are $10 for adults and $8 for students and 
seniors. Call 395-3055 for more details 

Saturday, December 2 

8:30 a.m. and !0:30.a.m., also held on the 
next 2 Saturdays, Lambs Farm 5th Annual 
Breakfast with Santa offers two seating 
times. Families are invited to The Country 
Inn Restaurant of Lambs Farm, Rte. 176 & 
1-94 in Libertyville. $9.95 for adults, $5.95 
ages 2 to 10, under age 2 admitted free. 
Music, clowns, face painting, pictures with 
Santa and much more. Held Dec. 9 and 
Dec. 16 also. Reservations at 362-5050 

9:30-11 a.m., Singles Breakfast Group for 
ages 55 plus. Held at In-Laws Restaurant, , 
720 Milwaukee Ave. in Gumee. Come and 
make new friends. Call Pat at 367-4936 i 

10 a.m.-4 p.m., Arts & Crafts Show held at 
College of Lake County Physical Education 
Center, Washington St. & US 45 in 
Grayslake, $2 admission 

Sunday, December 3 

9:30 a.m.-3 p.m.. Computer Country Expo 
held at The Holiday Inn, 6161 W. Grand in 
Gumee. $6 admission (visit the web site at 
www.ccxpo.com for $1 off coupon), free 
parking 

Sat & Sun., Zion Ice Arena hosts the 16th f 
Annual Holiday Open, a competition for 
skaters of all ages and levels. For more 
info., call Denise at 746-5500, ext. 464 

Monday, December 4 

12:45 p.m.. Bingo held at The Antioch 
Senior Center, info, at 395-7120 

1 p.m., Prairie Pioneers #1081, an organi- 
zation for the study of antiques and the 
preservation of heritage, meets at private 
home. For more information, call 223-4001 



5:30 p.m., TOPS group meets in 
Lindenhurst at the Victory Ambulatory 
Surgery Center and Outpatient Services at 
1050 Red Oak Lane. Call Tina at 265-9364 
or Helen at 356-5889 for more info. 

7 p.m., Antioch Garden Club meets in the 
Maplethorpe Room at the Antioch Comm. 
Center, visitors welcome, for more, call Suzi 
Hetzel at 395-3803 

7:30 p.m., Lake County Audobon Society 
meets in the second floor meeting room at 
Libertyville Village Hall, 118 West Cook St. 
Recent changes and developments in Illinois 
Beach State Park will be the topic. Public is 
welcome 

Tuesday, December 5 

6:45 p.m., Antioch VFW Bingo, doors open 
4:30 p.m., call 395-5393 



7:30 p.m., St. Peter Council of Catholic 
Women meet at parish hall, call 395-0274 

Wednesday, December 6 

6:30 p.m., TOPS Weight Loss weigh-in, 7 
p.m. meeting at Antioch Senior Center, 817 
Holbeck, info, at 395-6437 or 395-8143 

7-9 p.m., Northern Lake County Quilter's 
Guild meets at State Bank of the Lakes in 
Lindenhurst, call Valerie at 838-2126 

Thursday, December 7 

7 p.m., American Sewing Guild group "Run- 
ning in Stitches meets at State Bank of the 
Lakes, Lindenhurst, call Janet at 265-7932 

GOT SOMETHING 
GOING ON? CALL US! 

A 14-day notice is needed 
far all calendar requests. 
Call 223-8161 and ask for 
calendar assistance. Ore-mail 
calendar@lakelandmedia.com 



i 

: 






m 





A8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



December 1, 2000 



Happy 100th birthday, Ida! 



I got a call from a daughter who wants 
to let the whole town of Antioch in on a 
very special celebration that will be 
taking place this weekend. It seems 
that Ida Runyard-Kufalk will be celebrating 
her 100th birthday with an open house at 
Libertyville Manor, G10 W. Peterson Rd. (Rte. 
137) in Libertyville on Dec. 9 from noon-3 
p.m. Mrs. Runyard-Kufalk lias lived in the 
Antioch area all her life and spent 25 of those 
years teaching school. Just after World War I, 
she taught her first classes at Hockaday 
School, located just east of Millburn. She 
then took her talents to Emmons School, 
where she taught for five years. 

The next two years were spent teaching 
at Grass Lake School, where she then retired 
to raise a family after marrying Roy Kufalk on 
Dec. 26, 1926. After playing "mom" for 18 
years she decided to utilize her talents once 
again in the classroom and returned to 
teaching at Channel Lake School and Grass 
Lake School until she decided to permanent- 
ly give up all that chalk dust and those sharp- 
ened No. 2 pencils and retire in 1962. After 
her and (he mister retired, they spent their 
summers here in Antioch and their winters in 
Lakeland, Fla. 

After her husband's death in 1977, Ida 
continued to split her time between Antioch 
and Florida until 1997 when she fell she no 
longer wanted to be away from her family 
during the winter months. Over the years she 
kept herself busy being active in the Antioch 
Methodist Church, Antioch Women's Club 
and the Royal Neighbor of America. 

Up until her 99th birthday she lived in 
her house on Harden St. when she thought 
she would be more comfortable in a super- 
vised setting and relocated to Libertyville 
Manor in the Independent Living section. Af- 
ter awhile, even though she was still able to 
take care of herself completely, she moved to 
I he Assisted Living section of the Manor 
where she now spends her days. Unfortu- 




1 JINGLE FROM 
m PRINGLE 

LynnPringle 



nately, due to failing eyesight and hearing 
loss, Ida had to give up playing cards, but she 
is still fortunate to be able to indulge in her 
love for reading with large print books — she 
loves biographies and history books. She en- 
joys company and is able to hold up her side 
of the conversation with her sharp mind and 
terriRc memory of the past, as well as current 
events. 

Her favorite time of the day though is 
when the mail comes. She likes nothing bet- 
ter than receiving cards and letters from 
friends and relatives, former students and 
townsfolks. It is the hope of the family that a 
letter-writing, card-sending campaign will 
take place this weekend and all those who 
knew Ida, and maybe even a few of us who 
didn't have the opportunity to meet her, will 
drop her a line and wish her a Happy 100th 
Birthday. 

Her address is Libertyville Manor, Unit 
200, 610 W. Peterson Rd., Libertyville, 60048, 
and don't worry if you don't think your birth- 
day wishes will reach Ida in time for her big 
day. She will accept belated wishes just as 
readily. And so to Ida, on behalf or the whole 
town of Antioch, a big Happy Birthday to you 
and well wishes for another 1 00 years. 

And so goes another "Jingle from 
Pringle." 

Readers with information for "Jingle 
from Pringle" should call Lynn Pringle at 
395-6364. 



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Food for fun 

Above, Julie Gordon, 15, pays to see 
the movie "Stuart Little" with canned 
goods. The food drive was sponsored 
by the First National Bank-Employee 
owned in conjunction with the theater 
to collect food for the Antioch Food 
Pantry. Left, Dona Rae Ester shows her 
daughter Olivia, 9, and her friend Shel- 
by Leisner, 8, where to stack the bag 
of canned goods. — Photos by Julie 
Murphy 



Holiday shopping simplified 
with Chamber gift certificates 



By JUUE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 



Take the burden out of holiday shopping 
by buying Antioch Chamber of Commerce and 
Industry gift certificates. 

According to Barbara Porch, director of the 
Chamber, the gift certificates can be used the 
same way as cash at 300 businesses through- 
out the Chamber's membership. Participating 
members will display the Chamber's diamond 
symbol in their stores. 

"These certificates make great gifts be- 
cause they can be used in so many different 
ways," said Porch. "They can be used for every- 
thing from art and antiques, to practical things 
such as plumbing and hardware." 

The Chamber boasts the high level of ser- 
vice and personal attention given at the vil- 
lage's quaint shops and restaurants. Refur- 



bished parking lots add the convenience of 
shopping the downtown area. 

Gift certificates arc available at a number 
of locations including the Chamber office, Vil- 
lage Hall, Bank One, First National Bank-Em- 
ployee Owned, State Bank of the Lakes, Great 
Northern Bank and the Advertiser. 

A list of suggestions is offered by the Cham- 
ber includes toys, shoes, apparel, boating, can- 
dles, sporting goods, candy, flowers, hardware, 
dining, insurance, groceries, bikes, model 
planes, dolls, jewelry, banking, china, fitness, 
automotive, ice cream, books, beauty, art, golf, 
antiques, furnishings, collectibles, pet supplies, 
sweaters, bedding, parties, plumbing, Beanie 
Babies, crafts, fishing, medical, cigars, liquor, 
suits, hotel, home decor, electrical, travel, duct 
work, coffees, soaps, beach wear and pizza. 

For more information about these gift cer- 
tificates, call the Chamber office at 395-2233. 



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THE 
CUPBOARD 

John Phelps 



You the 

man 



Swishing through the net soft as church 
music was a common occurrence for 
former Libertyviile High star Matt 
Heldman. 

In fact, the 1994 graduate sank enough of 
those shots to storm into fourth-place in the 
County's all-time list with 1,877 points, The 
silky smooth 6-foot guard then went on to 
play and start collcgiately for the University of 
Illinois 

He would blow by you in a New York sec- 
ond. One fond memory of Matt doing so, re- 
peatedly, I might add, was when he drained 
12-of-17 field goals in a 37-point effort and 
victory over Mundelein in sectional action. 

The All-Stater Heldman, who averaged 27 
points per game his junior season at LHS, was 
very instrumental when the Wildcats claimed 
fourth-place in the state his junior campaign. 

It's been just about a year since this com- 
munity role model and renown hoops stud 
and his father, Otis, lost their lives in a tragic 
automobile accident. 

But Matt's legacy will live on. And here's 
your chance to be a part of it. 

A special presentation and special 
evening will take place Friday, Dec. 15 when 
the Wildcats entertain the Warren Blue Devils 
in North Suburban action. 

The presentation will take place at ap- 
proximately 7:15 p.m. At that time, keynote 
speakers, Matt's mother, Mrs. Linda Held- 
man, along with daughter, Amy, will dedicate 
Libcrtyville's new scoreboard in Matt's mem- 
ory. 

"It will be a special night indeed," said 
Libertyviile Athletic Director Tim Albers. 
"There isn't a finer person and athlete we 
could dedicate this evening to than Matt 
was." 

1 personally couldn't have said it any bel- 
ter. 

Following the game, there will be an 
informal gathering in the school cafeteria 
where friends and loved ones can spend 
time remembering one of the county's 
greats. 



And speaking of star athletes from Lake 
County, Warren senior running back Matt 
Vandaele became only the third player in 
Warren football history to be named to the 
Illinois High School Coaches All-State team. 

Vandaele capped off a brilliant career, 
rushing for nearly 1 ,500 yards and 25 touch- 
downs as the Blue Devils shared the NSC Lake 
title with Libertyviile. 

"It's truly a great honor for him," said 
head coach Dave Mohapp. "He's really estab- 
lished himself as one of the better players in 
Northern Illinois history. He's the total pack- 
age-he has speed, vision, the mental prepara- 
tion and a very competitive nature in whatev- 
er he does." 

Two teammates joining Vandaele as all- 
staters included defensive monster, line- 
backer Matt Hadsell, who was selected Hon- 
orable Mention following a 120 tackle-plus 
season, and tight end/outside linebacker 
Brent Kozlowski, who was named to the 
Academic All-State team. 

Vandaele joins tackle Troy Boettle 
(1978) and kicker Craig Shclton (1991) as 
the only one's to be named to receive 
such an award. 



And speaking of dedications, fans and 
friends are invited to join in a special pre- 
sentation Saturday, Dec. 2 at for Antioch 
High School's Doug Carlberg. 

Carlberg volunteered many hours 
helping the ACHS athletic department be- 
fore his untimely death two years ago. 

The flag in the North Gym will be dedicat- 
ed to Doug's memory before the Lady Se- 
quoits home basketball game against Lake 
Forest, The ceremony will commence at ap- 
proximately 2 p.m. 

John Phelps can be reached at (847) 223-8161, 
ext. 132; fax (847) 223-8810; or e-mail at 
edtt@lnd.com. 



SPORTS 



December 1, 2000 



Lakeland Newspapers /A9 



Sequoits boys hoops have chance to get even 



By JOHN PHELPS 
Sports Editor 



The Antioch varsity boys basketball team 
remembers it well. Last season's dismissal to 
Lake Forest in the first-round of the Class AA 
regionals, that is. 

Well, the Sequoits have a chance to even 
the score in an early season showdown 
when the Scouts come calling Dec. 1 at 7:30 
p.m. 

"We'd definitely like to return the favor," 
said Head Coach Jeff Dresser. "We played 
them three times last year and all of them were 
good games. We just need to do better at 
guarding their perimeter shooters (Tommy 
Smith and Mike LiddyJ.The team that elimi- 
nates the simple mistakes will prevail." 

Mistakes are few and far between for Se- 
quoit sharpshooter Eric White, who is expect- 
ed to carry much of the scoring load this sea- 
son. 

In Antioch's second-place finish during 
the Gold Ball Classic, which it hosted, White lit 
up the scoreboard, averaging 26 points per 
contest. 

"He's shooting very well right now," noted 
Dresser. "He also comes off screens and drives 
well, which really complements his outside 
game. He's also a very competetive player." 

Case in point-his outside shooting was at 
its best when he nailed 6-for- 10 trey's in a sec- 
ond-round victory over Highland Park 

Other standouts during the Gold Ball Clas- 
sic included 6-foot, 3-inch junior forward Jeff 




Dinner is served as Antioch's Eric White goes to the hole for a duece In the title 
game of Gold Ball Classic against Lake Zurich. — Photo by Steve Young. 



Huebner and 6-2 speedy senior forward Ari 
Brown, who can also light it up from anywhere 
any given time. 

"Both should take some of the scoring pres- 
sure off of Eric," said Dresser. 

Another senior guard that should wreak 
havoc as the season progresses is 6-2 Adam 
Durham. 

"He still seems a little tentative," said Dress- 
er on Durham, whose almost fully recovered 
from shoulder surgery a year ago. He can break 



down the defense and create a lot of things. 
He'll be back on the straightened arrow before 
you know iL" 

The aforementioned players should aid in 
Antioch improving on its 50 points per game 
average in 1999-2000. 

"I think we have better shooters overall on 
this team," said Dresser. 

And when the shooting is going well, ju- 
nior center Josh Bonner (6-6) should comple- 
ment Huebner well in the paint 



Lady Sequoit hoops loses heartbreaker to Grant 



By STEVE PETERSON 
Staff Reporter 



The stage was set for the Antioch girls to 
have a strong showing. 

A large crowd was on hand, the dance team 
performed, and die Sequoits would thank fans 
for coming out. 

Rosa Csulits and the Grant Bulldogs had 
other ideas. It was her lay-in that bounced 
around the rim and went in as the buzzer 
sounded, giving Grant a 43-42 thriller win. Or 
heartbreaker, depending on your point of 
view. 

Grant got the ball back with 5.2 sec- 
onds left on the clock because an Antioch 
player stepped out of bounds on an in- 
bounds play. It was Grant's fourth in- 
bounds in the final minute, all after time- 
outs, and the sophomore sank it, stunning 
the Sequoits. 

"You think you have seen just about 
everything," ACHS coach Don Zeman 
lamented. "But we missed so many nice shots 



before the game was close," Zeman said. 

The view was different on the other side, of 
course. 

"In the second half, we boxed out and 
played better defense. We were using the fun- 
damentals," said Grant coach Tom Oeffling. 

Csulits finished with 11 points to lead 
Grant. 

"I thought they were going to foul me and 
I would make both free throws," she said of the 
game-winner. "It seemed to take an eternity." 

Grant hosts Vernon Hills Dec. 1 at 2 p.m. in 
NSC Prairie Division play. Andoch hosts Lake 
Forest. 

The Bulldogs (3-3) had to overcome a 10- 
point halftlme deficit. Then there is that Anti- 
och height factor. ACHS features Justine 
Sinkus, a 5-10 senior forward (eight points), 6- 
1 junior Erica Brown (game-high 12 points), 6- 
1 senior Shelley Wolfgram (six points and a key 
defensive rebound in the final minute and sev- 
eral blocked shots). 

But Antioch has only the downer of a 1-5 
start "We just have not been playing consis- 



tent Tonight, it was the second half," Zeman 
said. 

Andoch led by as many as 11 points early 
In the second half. A three-pointplay by Csulits 
gave Grant hope, but it was stayed at nine and 
seven points for the final minute of the third 
quarter as Andoch made four free throws. 

A three-pointer by Jeanetta Ayers-Bersch 
(seven points) in which she spun and heaved it 
at the end of the third quarter sparked the 
Grant rally from a 37-30 deficit 

"The three was big. It started to make them 
believe," Oeffling said. 

Bersch and Csulits gave Grant hoops as the 
Bulldogs caught Antioch at 37-alI. The Sequoits 
tried to win the game at the line, but made only 
one of three in a key stretch. 

The Bulldogs designed plays for Ann 
LeHecka (six points) in the first few times they 
had the ball in the final minute. Those just 
missed. ACHS seemed to have the game in tact 
with a traveling call on Grant with 52 left But 
that move along the baseline proved fatal, giv- 
ing Grant a fourth chance it seized. 



For Antioch's Hammond, seeing is believing 



By JOHN PHELPS 
Sports Editor 



In conversation, one would never know 
Antioch sophomore cross country runner 
Amanda Hammond was paying attention to 
what you were saying. Well trust me-she is. 

Hammond, whose 1 lth-place effort in the 
Woodstock cross country regional a few short 
weeks ago helped the Lady Sequoits earn a sec- 
tional berth, suffers from a rare innate sight dis- 
order known as Stargardts, which is VnosUy 
hereditary. 

"I can only see clearly up to about a foot 
away," says Hammond, whose brother Oliver 
also suffers from the same disorder. "But my 
peripheral vision is very much intact" 

In this condition, the cone cells situated at 
the macula, deteriorate in function and even- 
tually die. The rod cells generally remain In 
tact. Symptoms usually start at a young, 20 to 
be exact 

Hammond first noticed she had the prob- 
lem when she was about 9-years-old. 

"I couldn't see the blackboard very well," 
she recalls. "Then when 1 was 1 1, we finally got 
it figured out" 

To their recollection, Hammond's parents, 
Gary and Debbie, think Amanda was the first 
one in the family to inherit Stargardts. 



"Her vision is about 20/300 and she can't 
make out fine lines over a foot away," said Gary 
Hammond. "The only thing she can really do is 
adjust, which she's done beautifully." 

Speaking of adjusting, note takers, larger 
print in her textbooks, and teachers writing out 
her assignments are just some of the many 
ways Amanda has overcome her sight disorder. 

As far as cross country running is con- 
cerned, "I try and go over the course several 
times and remember where the flags are," she 
said. "At some of the races, there were some- 
times markers pointing out where the white 
flags were so I could turn the comers and stay 
on course." 

Head girls coach Dick Harland said he no- 
ticed Amanda's sight disorder last season. 

"One day she was walking and carrying her 
textbooks and that's when I asked," he said on 
his two-year varsity runner. "Then I knew. 
She's done a great job adjusting. There was one 
race where she missed a flag after grabbing the 
lead. Unfortunately she had to let everyone 
catch up to her so she would have some guid- 
ance. I think is was the Wauconda dual meet" 

Harland said all of Amanda's time's were 
personal-bests at each course this season, with 
her season-best (15:51) coming at the Crystal 
Lake Central Invitational. 

"She's very loyal and dedicated and just a 




Sophomore Amanda Hammond's 11th- 
place finish in the Woodstock girls cross 
country meet helped the Sequoits fin- 
ish second and gain a berth In the sec- 
tionals.— Photo by Steve Young. 

really sweet person," he said. "Last summer, 
she corresponded with Olympic track star Mar- 
la Runyan via e.mail. Maria gave her a lot of en- 
couragement" 

Now that cross country is over, Amanda 
has her sights on soccer in the spring. 

"I'm a Little better at soccer," she said. 

From the looks of things, looks like Aman- 
da could do just about anything she wanted. 



I 



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B^Ha^aHMaaa^B^aMB 



Al / Lakeland Newspapers 



SPORTS 



December 1, 2000 



2000-01 LAKELAND GIRL'S BASKETBALL PREVIEW 



BASKETBALL CAPSULES 

(A quick look at Lakeland-Area teams 
heading Into the new century.) 

North Suburban 
Lake Division 
Antioch 

Lastyean 7-20, 4- 10 (NSC) 
Coach: Don Zeman (1st year) 
Key players: C Shelley Wolfgram,. 6-1, Sr; G 
Bethany Shore, 5-7, Sr; F Justine Sinkus, 5-10, Sr; 
C Erica Brown, 6-1 , jr; G Lauren Reynolds, 5-4, Sr; 
G Amy Mueller, 5-6, Jr. 

Outlook: The Lady Sequoits could have packed- 
it in during a trying 7-20 campaign last year. But 
with seven returning seniors, along with new 
first-year coach Don Zeman, the cards are in An- 
tioch's favor for improving on that mark. All- 
area players Wolfgram and Brown should wreak 
havoc in the middle as both stand over six feet 
tall. Speed in the backcourt will also be a plus 
with a II -area recipients Sinkus, Shore and 
Mueller at the guard position. Sinkus can light it 
up from ihree-pnint range while Wolfgram led 
last year's squad with 10 points and seven re- 
bounds jiur Contest. 

Libertyville 
Last yean 22-H. II -3 (NSC) 
Coach: Bill Mix (2nd year) 
Key players: F7C Lizzie Aldridgc, 5-II.Jn G/F K.C. 
Cnninx, 5-H, Sn G Courtney Dydo, 5-4, Sn G/F Kel- 
ly True, 5-9. So; G Shannon Devine, 5-H, Sr; C/F 
jessic 1 l-ngstiom, li-0. Sn G Jenny Boatman, 5-6, Sr. 
Outlook: liven without defensive magician Ariu 
Va'rc (out for season vvilh torn ACL) and Diana 
Steplyk (volleyball), the Cats will be tough and 
should compete vvilh Stevenson and Warren for 
the NSC Lake title. Much of the scoring load has 
fallen on the shoulders of Aldridge. whose averag- 
ing 1 H ppg through seven contests. Dydo, Boatman 
and Devine can shoot from the perimeter as well as 
penetrate. Junior guard Joyce Kleinhein/. (5-6) has 
stepped up her game coming ofT the bench. Sopho- 
more True has been a nice spark as well, both in 
scoring and steals. 

Muiideleiii 

Last yean 12-15,5-9 (NSC) 

Coach: Brian Evans 

Key players: G Shannon Jung, 5-1, Sr; G 

Catherine Chresanthakes, 5-H, Sr; G Lizzy 

Washburn. 5-9, Jr; F Ashley Stein, 5-10. Jr; F 



Eileen Foley, 5-11, Jr. 

Outlook: This team has a tack of size but will look 
to counter that by reluming all five starters from 
last year's team. This team plays strong defense 
and will look to hold teams under 40 points per 
game on a regular basis. If the Lady Mustangs can 
accomplish that, it will offset their inconsistent of- 
fense and free throw shooting. Head coach Brian 
Evans hopes that his team will win more games 
than last year's total of 12. Me also hopes to win 
the three tournaments that Mundclein will play in 
as well as beat each team in conference at least 
once. Although that seems like a tall order for a 
team with no starter over 5-11, this team is capa- 
ble of achieving all of their goals and perhaps even 
more. 

Warren 

Lostyeon 16-14, 10-4 (NSC) 
Coach: John Stanczykicwicz ( 
Key players: F Kelly Mikkila, 5-10, Sr; G Tina 
Mrock, 5-9, Sr; F Amy Peters, 6-1, So; F Julianne 
Jackson, 6-1, So; G Leah Foster, 5-6, Jr. 
Outlook: This team is relatively inexperienced at 
the varsity level with five sophomores on the roster 
including two starters in Amy Peters and Julianne 
Jackson. The senior leadership of captains Kelly 
Mikkila and Tina Mrock will look to balance that in- 
experience and give this team a killer instinct in late 
game situations. This team also has tremendous 
size with Peters and Jackson each measuring 6-1. 
However, if this team hopes to compete in close 
games the free throw shooting will have to improve 
rapidly. I lead coach John Stanczykicwicz expects 
his team to constantly improve diroughout die sea- 
son and be competitive in every game. With this 
team's height and senior leadership, this team 
shouldn't have any trouble competing in any game 
this season. 

North Suburban 
Prairie Division 
Grant 

Lostyeon 10-17 (Independent) 

Coach: Tom Oeffling (2nd year) 

Key players: G Becky Holcm, 5-7, Sr; F Jcnni 

Wick, 5-7, So; G Rose Csulils, 5-7, So; G Nicole 

Shannon, 5-6, Sr. 

Outlook: The Bulldogs have two sophomores in 

Wick and Csultis who will play big roles and grow 

with the team, which is young and consists of 

mostly juniors. Becky Holcm exemplifies the 



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competitive nature of Bulldog athletes. Could be 
a force not to be taken for granted in the North 
Suburban Prairie, seen by many as up for grabs. 

Wauconda 

Last year: 12-13 (Independent) 

Coach: Tim Bartusch (2nd year) 

Key players: G Melissa King, 5-7, Sr.; G Jodi Mcr- 

ganthaler, 5-6, Sr; G Tara Baker, 5-6, Sr. 

Outlook: The Bulldogs enter the first year of the 

NSC Prairie with six experienced players. Team 

speed will be a big asset with Baker and Mcrgan- 

thaler boasting strength in the backcourt. Mcr- 

ganlhaler averaged almost 10 points a game last 

year. 

Round Lake 

Last yean 20-0 (Independent) 

Coach: Gary Edge ( 15lh year) 

Key players: F/C Jenni Malueg, 5-10, Sn G Kalah 

Blue, 5-2, Sr; G Gina Spear, 5-4, Sn G Rencc Ochs, 

5-4, Sr. 

Outlook.* Things look promising for Bound Lake 

as it looks to duplicate on one of its best season's 

in recent history. The Lady Panthers finished 20- 

0, its second straight 20-win season. 

All-county recipient Malueg is one of the 
premier post-players, averaging 15 points per 
contest as a junior. Her scoring, leadership, and 
rebounding will be key if Round Lake wants to 
contend for the first-ever North Suburban Prairie 
basketball title. 

Senior guards Gina Spear (5-4) and Rencc 
Ochs (5-4) will add depth and speed to the back- 
court. Shelly Juchcinski should complement 
Malueg in the paint. 

Vernon Hills 

Last year: (This is first season) 
Coach: Paul Brcttner (1st year) 
Key players: G Kim Rymer, 5-8, So; G Beth Plu- 
cinski, 5-5, So; F Natalier Ncer, 5-10, Jr; F Jenny 
Kosalka, 5-9, Jr. 

Outlook: The Cougars had a tough early portion 
of the schedule, playing in the Hinsdale South 
tourney against some ranked teams. Rym?r is a 
player to watch from the guard slot while Neer 
hopes to use her 5-11 height to battle for re- 
bounds. This group of energetic juniors, sopho- 
mores and freshmen may be a factor in the NSC 
Prairie in the second half of the season, if not 
sooner. 



esgc 

Carmel 

Lost year: 16-13, 4-6 ( 3rd ESCC) 
Coach: John Ryan (2nd year) 
Key players: F/G Samantha Rinella, 5-8, Sn G 
Kelly Bacehowski, 5-5, Sn G Kaitlin Krpmbach, 5- 
5, Fn C Christine Martinson, 5-11, Jr; P-Gd Kylie 
Adams, 5-6, Jn Pt-G Nicole Kopier, 5-5, Jn F 
Megan Lick, 5- 10, So. 

Outlook: It must be in the blood because even 
though Carmel lost leading scorer Kelly Krombach 
to graduation, sister KaiUin, only a freshman, is 
picking up right where her sister left off. Through 
its first six games, Kaitlin Is averaging 17 ppg. "She's 
been a p! casan t su prise and is only go ing to get bet- 
ter," said head coach John Ryan. Martinson, aver- 
aging 10 points per game thus far, should be a force 
inside. But more importantly perhaps, the Corsairs 
have depth with 5-7 guard Jamie Feldman, who 
saw plenty of varsity action a year ago; and Wood- 
lands Academy transfer, 5-7 forward Katie 
Fuhrman. "We have a lot of different people who 
can contribute and we play a tough and aggressive 
defense," added Ryan. Following a second-place 
showing in the Mundelcin, look for Carmel to com- 
pete in the always-tough ESCC. 

Fox Valley 
Grayslake 

Last year: 25-5, 16-2 (FVQ 
Coach: Mike Muldrow (3rd year) 
Key players: F Megan Francis, 6-1, Jr; F Tiffany 
Tietze, 5-10, Jn F Elizabeth Sims, 5-8, Jr; G Kristin 
Ptasecki, 5-6, Jr, G Nicole Stefani, 5-2, Jr. 
Outlook: Although this team lost all five starters 
from last year's Fox Valley champs, head coach 
Mike Muldrow's expectations- are still high. With 
five junior starters he still expects his team to 
compete for both the Fox Valley and regional ti- 
tles. This team, while certainly not as tall as last 
year's squad, is just as quick, strong and athletic. 
The Lady Rams also play together as a unit both 
on offense and defense, giving them great offen- 
sive and defensive execution. This team figures to 
get stronger as the season goes on, as the inexpe- 
rienced starting five learns how to play in tight 
games. If the team continues to play together and 
gains experience, look for the Lady Rams to repeat 
as FVC champs. >■ . , 

Stave Peterson, John Phelps and Hob 
Backus contributed to this report. 



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December 1, 2000 



SPORTS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A1 1 



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TRI-COUNTY YOUTH FOOTBALL LEAGUE STANDINGS. RESULTS 



Trl-County Youth Football League 

Standings 

Bantams 

Crystal Lake 9-0; Lake Zurich 8-1; Cary7-2; 
Antioch 6-3; Grayslakc 5-4; Mt. Prospect 3-6; Wau- 
conda 2-7; Llbertyville 2*7; Dundee-Crown 2-7; 
Harrington .1-8. 
Big Ten Pec Wees 

Crystal Lake 8-1; Antioch 8- 1 ; Gary 7-2; Lake 
Zurich 6-3; Mt; Prospect 5-4; Grayslakc 4-5; Wau- 
conda 3-6* Llbertyville 2-7; Harrington 1-8; Dundee- 
Crown 1-8. 
Dig Ten Featherweights 

Crystal Lake 9-0; Llbertyville 8- 1 ; Mt.' Prospect 
(i-3; Harrington 6-3; Gary 5-4; Antioch 5-4; 
Crnyslake 3-6; Dundee-Crown 2-7; Lake Zurich 1-8; 
Wmiconda 0-9. 
Dtg Ten lightweights 

Mhcnyville 9- 1 ; Crystal bike 8- 1; Grayslakc 7- 
2: Cnry 6-3; Antioch 4-5; Dundee-Crown 4-5; Mt. 
Prospect .3-6; Barringion 3-6; Ukc Zurich 1-8; Wau- 
conda 0-9. 
BlgTen varsity 

Ul)crtyyillf!9-b; Harrington 8-1; Grayslakc 7-2; 
Like Zurich 6-3; Gary 4-5; Mt. Prospect 4 -5; Antioch 
1-5; Crystal Like 2-7; Dundee-Crown 1-8; Waucon- 
da 0-9. 
Pac 10 Bantam ' 

Grayslakc tt 1 7* I ; Cary 6- 1 -2; 1-ikc Zurich Blue 
1-4-1 ; Grayslake #2 4-5; Like Zurich While 3-6; An- 
licich 1-8. 
Pac 10 Pee Wee 

Gary #3 9-0; Dundee-Crown 7-2; Grays|ake #2 
7-2: Gary 01 6-3; Antioch #15-4; Harrington 5-4; An- 
tioch #2 5-4; Like Zurich Blue 3-6; Like Zurich 
White 2-7; Grayslakc 03 2-7; Like Zurich Red 2-7; 
Dundee-Crown #2 1 -H; Grayslakc tf I I -8. 
Pac 10 Featherweights 

Dundee Crown H I 9-0; Gary ft 1 8- 1 : Gary #3 8- 
I ; Bariihgtcn tt 1 6-3; Grayslakc $2 6-3; Like Zurich 



Red 5-4;,Dundee-Crown H2 5-4; Gary tt2 4-5; Har- 
rington #24-5; Lake Zurich Blue 3-6; Antioch #2 3-6; 
Grayslake til 3-6; Antioch HI 2-7; Lake Zurich White 
2-7; Wauconda 0-10. 
Pac 10 Lightweights 

Grayslake #1 9-0; Grayslakc H2 8-1; Cary 5-4; 
Dundee-Crown 5-4; Antioch 4-5; Barrington 3-6; 
Lake Zurich Blue 1-8; Lake Zurich Red 1-8. 
Pac 10 Varsity 

Barrington 8-1; Palatine 7-2; Cary6-3; Lake 
Zurich Blue 6-3; Schaumburg 5-4; Arlington Hts. 3- 
6; Mt. Prospect I -8; Warren Twp. 0-9. 
Playoffs 
Big 10 Bantams 
First-round 
Crystal Lake 1 2, Antioch 
Cary 14, Lake Zurich 
Championship 
Crystal Lake 14, Cary 6 
Big 10 Pee Wee 
First- round 
Crystal Lake 8, CaryO 
Antioch 7, Lake Zurich 
Championship 
Crystal Lake 22, Antioch 6 
Big 10 Featherweights 
First-round 

Crystal Lake 33, Mt. Prospect 
Barrington 8, Libertyville 
Championship 
Crystal Lake 26, Barrington 14 
Big 10 Lightweights 
First-round 
Crystal Lake 6, Grayslake 
Libertyville 8, CaryO 
Championship 
Crystal Lake 8, Ubertyville 
Big 10 Varsity 
First-round 
Grayslakc 20, Barrington 14 



LOCAL SPORTS 



Prairie State Games, Illinois largest amateur 
sports festival, is accepting applications for the 
Dec. 16 and 17 Girls Holiday Hoops tourna- 
ment to be held in the greater Fairvicw Heights 
and Belleville area in southwestern Illinois. 

The PSG Girls Holiday Hoops is geared 
toward girls competitive teams in grades five- 
eight. Bach of the four divisions will be limit- 
ed to 12 teams; Thlf tournament is open to 
teams from Illinois and its surrounding 
slates. List year's tournament featured a full 
field of -IB teams from Illinois, lowa, Indian 
and Missouri. 

The fee is $150, with three games guaran- 
teed. ILach loam has the option of pre-ordering 
T-shirts at $5 per shirt. The deadline to enter is 
Dec. l-.-A late fee of S25 will be added to the 
SI fiO regular fee if an application is received af- 
ter Dec. I. 

The Kliminators Basketball Club is co- 
hosting the tournament along with the Prairie 
State Games. 



For further information or to receive an 
application, contact Phil Donato or Dob Emig 
at the Prairie State Games office in Fairview 
Heights at (618) 632-1002. 

The Foss Park District Golf Course 
will be selling permanent tee times for the 
2001 golf season at the Community Youth 
Center at 1730 S. Lewis Ave., North Chicago. 
Call 689-7480. The non-refundable fee of each 
permanent tee time is $160. This year the per- 
manent tee times that have not been renewed 
and the times that did not sell in 2000 will be 
sold on a first come, first served basis. 

Sign ups for these available times will be- 
gin on Dec. 2 from 8 a.m.-noon and continu- 
ing from Dec. 4- 16 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. during 
the week and 8 a.m.-noon on Saturdays. 

Only one person from the foursome 
needs to be present to purchase a tee time, but 
must have the names and addresses of the 
other golfers in the foursome. Checks and ex- 
act cash are acceptable, no credit cards are ac- 
cepted at the Community Youth Center. 

For more information, call 689-7480 or 
the golf course at 689-7490. 




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Libertyville 22, Lake Zurich 

Championship 

Libertyville IB, Grayslake 

Pac 10 Bantam 

Cary 12, Lake Zurich Blue 6 

Grayslake #\ 21, Grayslake #2 13 

Championship 

Cary 7, Grayslake #16 

Pac 10 Pee Wee 

First-round 

Antioch #3 6, Barrington 

Antioch #16, Cary #20 

Cary #3 6, Cary #10 

Grayslake #2 20, D-Crown #1 

Consolation 

Aniioch#36,Antioch.#l 

Championship 

Cary #3 18, Grayslake #2 6 

Pac 10 Featherweight 

Grayslake #2 6, Cary #2 

Lake Zurich Red 14, D. -Crown #2 

Barrington #1 14,D.-Crown#10 

Cary #3 7, Cary #16 

Consolation 



Lake Zurich Red 25, Grayslake #2 

Championship 

Barrington 14, Cary #3 6 

Pac 10 lightweights 

Grayslake #1 39, D.-Crown 7 

Grayslake #2 28, Cary 21 

Championship 

Grayslake #2 27, Grayslake #1 7 

Pac 10 Varsity 

Barrington 28, Leke Zurich 13 

Palatine 40, Cary 25 

Championship 

Barrington 18, Palatine 6 

Antioch results 

(Week-by-week) 

Antioch 12, Libertyville 8 

Cary7,Antiochn 

Antioch 19, Barrington 

Crystal Lake 12, Antioch 

Lake Zurich 13, Antioch 6 

Antioch 7, Wauconda 6 

Antioch 6, ML Prospect 

Antioch 19, Dundee-Crown 6 

Antioch 13, Grayslake 7 






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NEWSPAPERS 
December 1-7, 2000 




AWARD WINNING CLASSIFIED INSIDE 



COUNTY DIGEST 



Holiday Cookie sale 

Don't have time to bake? Pick 
up dozens of homemade cookies at 
the annual Lake County Association 
for Home and Community Education 
Christmas holiday cookie sale on 
Dec. 16, from 9 a.m.-noon, at the 
University of Illinois Extension Edu- 
cation Center at 1 00 S. US. Hvvy. 45 in 
Grayslake, two blocks north of Rt. 
.120. 

GUI Margaret Hilliard at 223-504 1 
to place orders by the half-pound. 
You can pick up your orders at the 
cookie sale. 

Winter nature camp 

With winter break just around the 
corner there's no better time like the 
present to help children discover and 
enjoy the hidden magic of nature this 
season. Register your children today 
for the Lake County Forest Preserve's 
Winter Camp at the Ryerson Conser- 
vation Area near Decrfield. The camp 
runs from Dec, 18-22, from 9:30 a.m.- 
3:30 p.m. 

The Winter Camp is open to chil- 
dren in grades two-four without an 
adult. The cost is S 152 ($109 for Lake 
County residents) per person. Regis- 
tration and pre-payment are re- 
quired. 

Ryerson Woods is located on 
Riverwoods Rd. just south of Half Day 
Ud. (Rte. 22) near Decrfield. For more 
information or lo register, call Lake 
County forest Preserves at 968-3321. 



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named 
GM of Lakeland Media 



Grayslake residents John Cuneo Jr. and his wife, Herta, have giv- 
en $14 million to the Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine 
In Maywood— Photo by Sandy Bressner 

Cuneo gift aids Med School 




CALABRESA 
UNSURE 

Forest preserve presidency 
in doubt until Monday 



SEE 
PAGE C2 



CHRISTMAS 
MEMORIES 

Readers share their 
favorite yule stories 

SEE 
SECTION C 



A new chapter has been added to 
a prominent Lake County family's 
history of philanthropy. 

Following the legacy of his father, 
John F. Cuneo Jr. and his wife, Herta, 
are donating $14 million to Loyola 
University Stritch School of Medi- 
cine. 

The gift will support the school's 
state-of-the-art medical education 
building at the medical school's May- 
wood campus. 

School officials 

said the gift is the 

largest donation giv- 

'en to Loyola in its 

130-year history. 

The Cuneos re- 
side on Chardon Rd., 
Fremont Township, 
rural Cray slake. 

'Hie medical education building 
will be named the "John and Herta 
Cuneo Center" in honor of the fami- 
ly's continued support of LUC Stritch 
School of Medicine. 

Members of the Cuneo family 
have been friends and charitable 
contributors to LUC for some 50 
years, lohn Cuneo's father, John Sr., 
was a close friend of the Rev. James T. 
Hussey, S.J., president of Loyola Uni- 
versity Chicago from 1945-1955, and 
Samuel Cardinal Stritch, for whom 
the Stritch School of Medicine is 
named. John Cuneo Sr. was a promi- 
nent Catholic businessman who 
played a leadership role in the early 
development of the medical school 

The late business leader received 
an honorary degree from LUC. 

"I am proud to continue the tra- 



'lam proud to continue 

the tradition that 

myfatfwr initiated' 

John F Cuneo Jr. 



dition that my father initiated by 
contributing to an organization 
founded on Catholic ideals and de- 
voted to superior education and 
medical services," said Cuneo. 

The Cuneo family enterprises 
have included Cuneo Press, a print- 
ing company that Cuneo's father 
founded in 1907, and Milwaukee 
Golf Development Corporation, 
which developed Golf Mill Shopping 
Center in Niles, among other retail 
complexes. Cuneo 
Press was sold in 
1990. John Cuneo 
Jr. serves as presi- 
dent of The Cuneo 
Foundation and is a 
general partner in 
Milwaukee Golf De- 
. velopment Co. The 
Family resided on a large farm south 
of Libertyville. Their home now is a 
museum. 

John and Herta Cuneo also fund 
a scholarship that offers $12,000 
every four years to an academically 
outstanding undergraduate student 
pursuing studies at LUC. The Cuneos 
are members of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Annual Award Dinner 
of the Stritch School of Medicine, the 
Leadership Society and the Presi- 
dent's Society. 

In 1999, John Cuneo Jr. received 
Loyola's Damen Award for his contri- 
butions to the Chicago community, 
and in 1995, Herta Cuneo was pre- 
sented with the Loyola Camellia 
Award far her commitment to chari- 
table, educational and cultural orga- 
nizations. 



Robert J. Schroeder 
has been named general 
manager of Lakeland 
Media, the locally owned 
and operated company 
that publishes 11 com- 
munity news weeklies, 
the Market Journal and 
Great Lakes Bulletin, the 
official newspaper for 
Great Lakes Naval Train- 
ing Center. 

Schroeder, 31, for- 
merly was general sales 
manager for the central 
Lake County based firm 
that also operates the Country Ped- 
dler for midwest antiquers and col- 
lectors, and Lakeland netDIRECT, an 
Internet service provider with web 
page design and hosting services. 

Besides special interest inserts 
and community guides, Lakeland 
Media publications are delivered to 
more than 156,000 Lake County 
homes weekly. 

The newspaper executive has 




Schroeder 



held a succession of 
management positions 
including circulation 
manager for the Lake- 
land Newspaper divi- 
sion, Market Journal 
advertising manager, 
classified advertising 
director and general 
manager for Internet 
operations. 

At Purdue University, 
Schroeder studied busi- 
ness management and 
was active with the Expo- 
nent, the Purdue Daily. He 
was employed in the marketing de- 
partment of Montgomery Newspa- 
pers, Ft. Washington, Penn., serving 
suburban Philadelphia. 

Schroeder is a director of the 
Lake Villa-Undenhurst Chamber of 
Commerce and is a member of the 
Libertyville Rotary Club. 

He is married to the former Elise 
Simko of Lake Forest They reside in 
Libertyville. 



By USA ROWE 
Staff Reporter 



Outstanding service awards 
given to Lake County residents 

when their life is falling apart We 
keep the child safe, and advise the 
court of what is going on. You vol- 
unteers are a person who prevents 
more abuse." 

Outstanding service awards 
were given to Lake County residents 
Marie Lindberg ofWaukegan, Kevin 
Rodgers of Kildeer, Betty Curley of 
Mundelein, Jim Minor of Round 
Lake Beach, Marsh Olshefke, Sara 
Klugman and Cookie Rudnick, all of 
Highland Park. 

Rookie awards for outstanding 
service were given to volunteers with 
less then one year of experience. Re- 
cipients of this award included Don 
Lyons of Lake Forest, Christine Kan- 
daras of Riverwoods, Karen Marcus 
of Deerfield and Jody Holzman of 
Highland Park 

CASA, the Court Appointed Spe- 
cial Advocates Association, is based 
near Riverwoods and Buffalo Grove 
and in the Robert Depke Juvenile 
Justice Center in Vernon Hflis. Infor- 
mation on the organization, its vol- 
unteer services and volunteer fund- 
ing program may be obtained by 
calling 808-9154. 



Lake County resident volun- 
teers were recognized by CASA 
Lake County at a recognition din- 
ner held at the Harrison House In 
Lake Bluff. . 

Judge Joseph Waldeck told die 
90 attendees that the CASA volun- 
teers spend "countless hours oh be- 
half of our children in Lake County." 

During a report to the volun- 
teers, CASA is monitoring 230 child 
abuse and neglect cases. They have 
also had 68 new child case assign- 
ments in the first eight months of 
this year. It was also noted that there 
are over 500 abused children without 
a CASA to speak up for their best in- 
terests. 

The CASA president, attorney 
Barbara Weiner from Highland Park, 
spoke to the volunteers and stressed 
how the children "see you as a role 
model. Few people have greater im- 
pact on the life of a child." 

She also spoke about the duties 
of CASA and how they serve the chil- 
dren. "We come into a child's life 



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B2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



December 1, 2000 



Forest Dist. presidency 
'up in air' until Dec. 4 



Amid a flurry of caucuses 
and strategy sessions over lunch, 
commissioners of the. Lake 
County Forest Preserve Dist. 
spent the week deciding who 
they want to serve as president 
for the next two years. 

The "up in the air" atmosphere 
surrounding election day Monday, 
Dec. 4, left President Carol Cal- 
abresa, representing a Libertyville 
district," in a quandary about her 
chances for re-election. 

"We're working on it," is the 




Calabresa 



ing out in the president's mind are 
passage of two bond issues totaling 
$140 million, acquisition of more 
open space, including large farms in 
Antioch and Fremont Township, 
and continuation of the district's na- 
tionally acclaimed program. 

County Board Rep. Sandy Cole (R- 
Grayslake), steering clear of men- 
tioning Calabresa or any possible 
challengers, said discussions involv- 
ing the presidency cover an evalua- 
tion of the individual strengths of 
board members. 



Congressman Porter's 
district 



< i 







U.S. Rep. John Porter (R-lOth, IL) an- 
nounced that his district offices, in accordance 
with House of Representatives rules, officially 
closed at the end of the business day, Nov. 30. 
Porter did not seek re-election to Congress and 
his last day in office is Jan. 2, 2001. 

Any mail delivered to Rep. Porter after 
Nov. 30 will be forwarded to the Congress- 
man-elect in Illinois' 10th District, Mark 



ili- 



Kirk, who takes office Jan. 3, 2001 when the 
new Congress convenes. In the interim be- 
tween adjournment of the current Con- 
gress and Jan. 3, constituents needing im- 
mediate help from a Member of Congress 
should contact one of the U.S. Senators 
from Illinois: Sen. Peter Fitzgerald, (312) 
886-3506, or Sen. Richard Durbin (312) 
353-4952. 



way Calabresa, who was elected unanimously 
in 1998, described the process. 

"There are 23 members of the board. Each 
lias something to say, And everyone is having 
a say," exclaimed Calabresa, who is working 
bard to retain the presidency which carries a 
S 1 0,000 stipend over and above what commis- 
sioners earn in their joint role as members of 
the Lake County Board. 

"I'm not in this for the money. I think the 
Forest Preserve has accomplished a lot in the 
last two years," Calabresa pointed out. Stand- 



Cole said leadership of the district has fo- 
cused on a team concept maximizing every 
member's talents and interests. Cole pointed 
out that lining up the 12 votes needed to insure 
victory is different for the Forest Preserve pres- 
idency than County Board chair "because the 
Forest Preserve seat is not open like the Coun- 
ty Board due to the retirement of Chairman Jim 
LaBelfe." 

The commissioners will ballot for a presi- 
dent immediately after electing a new county 
chair Monday, Dec. 4. 



NEW BUSINESS 



The following are new businesses lo- 
cated in Lake County. 

Dog Day Afternoon Pet Groom- 
ing, 131 Washington St., Ingleside, IL 
60041, Kathleen Amos, Carolyn Ferrank, 
and ChrissyApplehans, owners. Phone 
(847)587-7166. 

Debra's Hondpalnted Creations, 
37220 N. Highway 59, Lake Villa, IL 60046. 
Debra Hurto, owrter. Phone (847) 587- 
8707. 

BML Financial Resource Group, 
4503 W. Forest Ave., Waukegan, IL 60085. 
Brian Levitan, owner. Phone (847) 263- 
9850. 



Breezy Point Properties, 1 1 N. 

Skokie Hwy., Lake Bluff, IL 60044. Karl R. 
Smutney and Jeff Bell, owners. Phone 
(847) 615-1200. 

RomaNautlca, 20538 Clarice Ave., 
Prairie View, IL 60069. Beverly J. Savinski, 
owner. Phone (847) 541-6003. 

Holly's Delivery, 1389 Almaden Ln., 
Gurnee, IL60031.Adell H. Kogerand Bruce 
C. Koger, owners. Phone (847) 338-0601. 

CM Travel, 1384 Fairport Dr., 
Grayslake, IL 60030. Christine McMulIen, 
owner. Phone (847) 548-6100. 

Awesome Nails, 143 Center St., 
Grayslake, IL, 60030. Mary H. Metscaviz, 
owner. 

Pro-Health, 1429 Vineyard Dr., 
Gurnee, IL60031. Elizabeth G. Kabuhat, 
owner. 



Improving service for you 
is our top priority 






» * 




W 



Susan McCall-Link 



e're not going to beat around the bush: Ameritech's 
recent service-quality needed improvement. 



While many factors contributed to it, we won't waste 
your time making excuses. We do want to apologize and fill 
you in on what we are doing to fix what we consider to be a 
service crisis. 

Ameritech has launched an accelerated customer care 
program to speed up installation and repair times. In brief, 
we've gone on a hiring and training binge. As part of this 
service improvement program, Ameritech is: 



• sending 300+ network technicians from sister companies Southwestern Bell 
and Pacific Bell to the five-state Ameritech region; 

• hiring 550+ regional technicians by the end of the year and another 3,330 
in 2001; 



• shifting 263 network technicians from construction to installation and 
repair; and 

• offering automatic $19 credits for residential customers — retroactive to 
January 1, 2000 — who have been out-of-service for more than 48 hours or 
been waiting more a week for installation of basic service. 

Over the long-term, we'll invest in enough people and equipment to always 
fulfill — or exceed — Illinois' regulatory standards. This effort is already 
underway, and early results show substantial improvement, indicating that our 
strategy is working. 

With these and other actions, Ameritech fully intends to satisfy our service 
commitments, and to earn back your respect as an outstanding company and an 
outstanding member of our community. 



Susan McCall-Link 
Area Manager 
External Affairs 




(Alnefltech 



For more information on this and other telecommunications 

issues, visit www.connectilliiiois.org 









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SPORTS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B3 



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lbe- 
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[im- 
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High Schools 
Boys basketball 
Antloch Tournament 
Second round 

l-oke Zurich 80, Grayslake 34 

Anlioch 50, Highland Park 45 

Final round 

1 1 ighland Park 53, Grnyslakc 38 

Lake Zurich 59, Anlioch 39 

Note: Lake Zurich wins tourney vvjth 3-0 record. 

Bartlett Tournament 

Fourth round 

Maine West 54, Vernon Hills 48 

Bartlcit 66, Dundee-Crown 61 

Note: Cougars finish 1 -3 

JohnsburgTournoment 

Final round 

Wauconda52, Richmond-Burton 43 

Grant 45, Johnsburg 40 

Mundcleln Tournament 

Mundelcin59, Barrington 39 

Prairie Ridge 74 t Round Lake47 

Note: Mustangs wins tourney with 3-0 mark. . 

Second round 

Barrington 52, Round Like 23 

Mundcleln 76, Prairie Ridge 44 

NUes West Tournament 

Nitcs West 75, Prosser72 (7ih pi.) 

Notre Dame 57, CVS 56 (consolation) 

Ubcrtyvillc 68. 1 iyde Park 59 (3rd pi.) 

NcwTricr72, Loyola 55 (lille) 

Waukegan Tournament 

Final round 

Warren 45, Waukegan 25 

Camiei63,Frcmd6l(20T) 

Note: Warren wins tourney with 3-0 record. 

Second round 

Warren 66; Camicl 4 1 

f-rcmd 73, Waukegan 54 

Girls basketball 

Buffalo Grove Tournament 

Final round 

I jbertyyille 52, Lake Park34 

New Trier SI, Resurrection 37 

BufTalo Grove 39, Warren 3B 

Maine South 60, Barrington 53 (title gtn.) 

Fourth round 

I jbertyville 68, Warren 42 

Buffalo Grove 54, Lake Park 52 

Barrington 65. Resurrection 52 

NewTrier45, Maine South 38 

Deerflcid Tournament 

Fourth round 

Round Like 44. Glenbrook N. 37 

Dcerficld 85, N.Chicago 38 

Waukegan 46. Niles North 43 (OT) 

Une45,Leyden39 

Final round 

Line 59, Round Like 36 

I lighland Park 50, Waukegan 42 

I Jike Forest 47. N. Chicago 35 
Niles North 59. Lcyden 24 
Decrfield 44, Glenbrook N. 18 (title) 
Fen to nl Elk Grove Tourney 
Final round 

Penton 53, Zion-Benlon 47 
Grayslake 61, Wcstmont 27 
Niles West 45, Elk Grove 38 
Note: Grayslake wins tourney. 

II InsdoJ e S. Tournament 
Final round 

Vernon 1 1 ills 34, Larkin 31 
Neuqua Valley 74, Plainfield 42 
I linsdaleC. 47. Hinsdale S. 33 (title) 
Third round 

Neuqua Valley 74. Vernon 1 lills 40 
I linsdaleC. 57. Plainfield 4 1 
Hinsdale S. 61. Larkin 47 
JohnsburgTournament 




(Stats, news and such from the world of colleges, high schools, youths, etc..) 




One tough Bulldog! 

We made an error in the 11-24 edition with regards to the all-area football team. 
Mistakenly, we left off Grant's Charlie Dennis, who is undoubtedly a first-teamer. 
Dennis, a 5-foot, 9-inch senior running back and defensive back, raced for 662 
yards and 9 touchdowns while racking up another 149 yards with a score on the 
receiving end. Dennis, also named to the first team all-North Suburban Confer- 
ence team, resides in Ingleside. — File photo 



Final round 

Wauconda 40, Woodstock 24 

Johnsburg44, Richmond-Burton 43 

Mundcleln Tournament 

Final round 

Hoffman Estates 65, GL Central 40 

Mundcleln 39, Carmel 34 

Note; Mundcleln wins tourney with 3-0 mark. 

Girts bowling 

Stevenson Invitational 

AT-Huwthorn lanes 

Final team standings: Varsity A: 1 . Liber- 
tyvilie4,477. 2. Warren 4,233. 3. Antioch 4, 177. 4. 
Palatine 4,154. 5. Schaumburg 4,063. 6. Fremd 3,988. 
7. BufTalo Grove 3,861. 8. Morgan Park 3,844. 9. Ja- 
cobs 3. 723, Varsity B: 1. Stevenson 3,788. 2. Wheel- 
ing 3,784. 3. Like Forest 3,465.4. Hoffman Estates 
3,459. 5. Grant 3390. 6. Vernon Hills3373. 7. 
Grayslake 3,294. 8. Zion-Benton 3,149. 
Individuals 

1. Hillary Markson, Stevenson, 1,051. 2. Roberta 
Byrk, Schaumburg, 996. 3. Jade Leasure, Libertyville, 
986. 4. Sarah Dcmatteo, Palatine, 955. 5. Melissa 
Hansen, Antloch. 920. 6, Kim Kam, Jacobs,913. 7. 
Christine Maret, Palatine, 906. 8. Laura Pfeiffer, Liber- 
tyville, 906. 9. Kristin Curtis, Warren, 905. 10. Lindsay 
Rothman, Vernon Hills, 902. 
Other area scoring 

Libertyville-Andra Hjelm 884; Karen Bates 901; 
Kclsey Maynard 817. 
AnUoch-Katic Lyons 738. 
Warren-Ashlce Browdcr874; Anna Padilla 836; Va- 
lerie Re 11 817. 
Grant-Angela Blair 764. 
Other results 



Libertyville 2324, North Chicago 1,911 

High series-jade Leasure, Libertyville, 490. 

Libertyville 2,690, Stevenson 2,290 

High series-Sarah Weller, Libertyville, 642 

(219 high-game) 

Junior Varsity 

Libertyville 2,245, Stevenson 1,927 

High series- Kclsey Maynard, Libertyville, 495 

(201 high game) 

Wrestling 

Grayslake 54 , Antioch 1 8 

Libertyville 62, Round Lake 10 

New Trier 43, Grayslake 33 

Prairie Ridge 46, Antioch 27 

West Aurora 53, Round Lake 2 1 

Wauconda 58, Job as burg 16 

Wauconda 60, Richmond-Burton 19 

Grant 41 , Maine West 27 

Grant 49, Barrington 18 

Warren 31, Carmel 18 

NUes West 52, Carmel 18 

Mundcleln 48, Round Lake 25 

Warren 45, NUes West 32 

Girls gymnastics 

Antioch 120.15, Lake Zurich 23 .05 

All-around; Amanda Wagoner, Antioch, 0.0 - 

Stevenson 145.7, UbertyvtlJc 134.35 

Vernon Hills 141.2, Mundelcinl 15.8 

Football 

State championship games 

Class 6A 

AT-Champalgn 

MaineS.27,GlcnbardN.8 

Class 5A 

Mt. Carmel 38, Providence 12 



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Class 4A 

Joller. Catholic 27, Metamora (14 

Saturday, Nov. II 

Quarterfinals 

Carmel 31, St Rita 14 

Catholic League Playoffs 

Championship game 

Sat, Nov. 25 

AT-Soldler Field 

Marian Catholic 23, Simeon 1 4 

AREA FOOTBALL STANDINGS 

(Final) 

(Overall, conference) 

North Suburban 

Lake Division 

•Warren 9-2, 4-1; •Libertyville 9-2, 4-1; Steven- 
son 6-4, 3-2; Antioch 6-4,3-2; L Forest 3-6, 1-4; 

Mundclein2-7,0-5. 

Prairie Division 

•ZL-Benton 7-4, 4-1; Grant 6-3, 4-1; Round 

Lake 3-6, 3-2; N. Chicago 4-5, 2-3; Vernon Hills 2-7, 
1-4; Wauconda 1-8, 0-5. 

Fox Valley 

•McHenry9-l,9-0; Prairie Ridge 8-1, 8-1; 

Woodstock 8-3, 6-3; Jacobs 5-4, 5-4; C.L South 4-5, 

4-5; Cary-Grove 4-5, 4-5; Dundee-Crown 3-6, 3-6; 

Lake Zurich 3-6, 3-6; Grayslake 3-6; 3-6; GLCentral 

0-9,0-9. 

Big Northern Red 

•Oregon 8-2, 5-0; Byron 7-2, 4-1; Burlington 
Cent 7-2, 3-2; Marengo 4-5, 2-3; Harvard3-6, 1-4; 
Johnsburg3-6,0-5. 
Catb. Metro White 

•Joliet Catholic 10-0, 7-0; Marian CathoIic9-2, 
5-2; Carmel 9-5, 4-3; Bishop McNamara 8-3, 4-3; 
Notre Dame 4-5, 3-4; Marist 4-5, 2-5.; St, Patrick 2-7, 
2-S;Benet2-7,l-6. 

(Note: * -denotes conference champion.) 
Prep News and notes 

Grayslake Community High School is cur- 
rently accepting applications and resumes for the 
head football coaching positioa According to Ath- 
letic Director Troy Harper, the interviewing process 
will most likely begin in January. 

"At that time, we should have a good idea of 
staff openings for next school year," he said The 
one chosen will serve as coach as well as fuilfill a 
teaching position as well" 

Further inquiries can be directed towards 
Harper at 223-8621, ext 1021. 
Youth Digest 
Results 

Grayslake'8 Mel leslnsld, 14, claimed the 
boys 1 4 singles di visi uon in the Turkey dub Open 
Tennis Tournament held at the Libertyville Tennis 
and Fitness Club over Thanksgiving weekend 

Lesinski defeated Chris Speer of Vernon Hills 
4*6, 6-3, 6-4 in a two-hour marathon. Lesinski was 
undefeated in three matches en route to the title. 
The Grayslake native also won the backdraw 
championship at the Kenosha Junior Open held at 
the East Side Tennis and Fitness Club. Lesinski de- 
feated opponents from Milwaukee, Ratine and 
Franksvilie to claim the first-place hardware. 
News and Notes 

Libertyville and Vernon Hills High 
Schools willofferaRed Cross Leam-To-Swim 
lessons this winter. Classes will begin Saturday, Jan. 
27 and take' place at 9, 10 and 11 a.m. on Saturday 
mornings. Children must be at least 4-years-oId to 
enroll in the classes and should be ready to partici- 
pate in a group lesson. Registration will be held at 
the Vernon Hills High School campus on Saturday, 
Dec. 2 from 8-930 am. For further information, 
please call Jim Pardun at 932-2228 or John Fischl at 
327-7072. 

And, tryouts and player evaluations for the 
Carmel Junior Corsair girls and boys basketball 
team will be held on Dec. 3 at Carmel HighSchopol in 
Mundelcin. Sixth-grader will commence from 5-6 
p.m., seventh-graders from 6-7 p.m., and eighth- 
graders from 7-8 p.m. The fee is $ 1 50. 

This year's program will feature traveling teams 

at each of the sixth, seventh, and eighth grade levels. 

Any sixth, seventh, eighth grade boy or giri who 

is considering future enrollment at Carmel High 

School is eligible for the program. 

They are looking for players who can commit to 
20-25 games and practice once a week. 

Carmel High School's basketball staff will also 
be offering special clinics. 

The Junior Corsairs play in the Northern Illi- 
nois Feeder League with teams from around the 
area. The girls team begins their season in mid- De- 
cember while the boys begin playing early January. 
Both girts and boys season's conclude in March. 

Please contact Dennis DufGn at (847) 949-8551 
for further details. 



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B4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



OPINIONS 



December 1, 2000 






NEWSPAPERS 



William H. Schroeder 

Publisher ■ 

Robert J. Schroeder 

General Manager 



30 South Whitney St., Grayslake, Illinois 60030 
Tel: (847) 223-8161. E-mail: edlt@lnd.com 



EDITORIALS 



VIEWPOINT 



Unanswered: 
why voters 'rate shy 9 

Voters tend to be generous when it comes to voting Tor tax in- 
creases for brick and mortar projects, but they are downright 
Scrooges when it comes to voting approval for increasing the 
tax rates that go to fund teachers salaries and purchase of 
educational materials. 

That was in evidence again last month when four out of four edu- 
cational rate increase issues put before voters in Lake County were de- 
feated, The losing propositions likely will be back on the ballot at the 
earliest possible opportunity, in this case, Feb. 27. Among the tax rale 
failures were requests by Antioch High, Warren High and and Lake 
Zurich Unit. 

After failed rale propositions, educators and school board leaders 
ask themselves, why are voters rate shy? After all, rejection of a rate 
increase defies the logic of building a sciiool and then not providing 
funding to operate the school. That's an over-simplication, of course, 
but the point is evident. 

Next question. What's the thought process of voters who vote the 
way they do? Oak Grove Elmenlary Supt. Patrick Patt, the county's se- 
nior superintendent, counsels not to read too much into what ap- 
pears to be an illogical act. Patt regards the reasoning behind rejec- 
tion of a rate hike as somewhat "convoluted," but he comes near 
to an answer with the observation, correct in our opinion, that many 
voters regard school budgets as containing "a lot of fat." 

Rejecting a rate hike amounts to a form of protest or the sending of 
a message that economizing is a cherished goal in the mind of the vot- 
er. Also, voters understand that building bonds are paid off in due 
course; the school rate goes on forever. 

Is it a novel idea to suggest that it makes sense to try and listen to 
what the voters are saying as opposed to psycholalyzing their motives? 

LaBelle's years 
known for quality 

The administration of retiring County Board Chairman Jim La- 
Bolle(U-Zion) will be known for a remarkable period of tran- 
quility and harmony. History will mark the LaBelle years as 
the extension of a man who sought concensus, respect and 
understanding in the administration of county government. 

LaBelle always demonstrated that the county chairman plays a big 
role in maintaining economic viability and providing quality of life 
leadership. He employed an even hand and a sense of balance to in- 
sure that no single business or industry was "taking over" the county. 
Like no previous chairman, LaBelle took steps to involve municipal 
leaders in county government, principally in development of the long- 
sought after Unified Development Ordinance that impacts mightily 
on land use and zoning. LaBelle set the stage where the county, vil- 
lages and cities can work together solving knotty problems like high- 
way transportation an affordable housing. 

The county chairman's sense of fairness brought an end to the di- 
bilitating fractionalism that has dogged the Lake County Hoard for 
years. Above all, LaBelle led by inclusion rather than exclusion. He 
was anything but a czar or a boss. Jim LaBelle spent 20 productive 
years in county government. He got things done and he set standards 
for professionalism and civility. 

Time to review 
lock'em up' policy 

With the Lake County Jail bulging and Illinois cruising mer- 
rily along on building more prisons ( with one a year it's a 
major growth industry), it's time to take a look at who's 
being put behind bars. 
; Prompted by the public's "lock'em up" mentality growing out of 
rampant drug useage, the Illinois criminal justice system has rcpond- 
ed with stiff and far-reaching sen encing policies. The sentencing 
practices have created a lot of felons and inmates, but haven't resulted 
necessarily in safer communities. Statistics show that about 50 per 
cent of the persons behind bars were convicted for non-violent 
crimes. A Dept. of Corrections report showed that 8,700 inmates 
could be handled in drug treatment facilities as opposed to prison in- 
carceration. 

That leads to speculation that imprisonment might not be the end- 
all answer for dealing with a segment of the law-breaking public. This 
presents a situation, in our opinion, that public opinion has to change 
about dealing with criminals who have hurt no one but themselves. 
Knee-jerk sentencing policies is subject is too touchy for elected offi- 
cials to challenge. Clearly, citizens need to speak out on whether al- 
ternatives to imprisonment are in order. 



Name to remember: Vista Health Center 



■ * * t 



What's in a name? 
Everything! 

No one knows that better 
than the executives ofVic- 
tory Hospital and St. 
Therese Hospital who arc 
charged with the job of merging the 
two venerable and respected Lake 
County hospitals. 
A new name, Vista Health, already 
identifies the hospital entity that is 
the successor to Victory and St. 
Therese. Following the physical 
move in early 2001 where Victory 
personnel and equipment will move 
from the north side of Waukegan to 
the St. Therese location on Washing- 
ton St., the surviving entity will be 
known as Vista Medical Center. 
Larry Stanley, vice president of 
marketing and planning, said lead- 
ers of both hospitals early in negoti- 
ations decided that a name change 
would be required to identify the 
new hospital. Making the decision 
was the easy part. Selecting a new 
name turned out to be a complicat- 
ed process that eventually involved 
252 employes from both hospitals 
who participated in naming exercis- 
es. 

Explaining that hospital manage- 
ment was open to all suggestions, 
Stanley, a veteran health care profes- 
sional with roots in Ohio, said em- 
ployees showed rare imagination 
and initiative in submitting names 
suggestions. 

"We had Lake County's first settlers 
suggested. Historic names. Names 
of famous people from Waukegan. 
Combining the names of the two 
hospitals was ruled out," Stanley 
noted. 

What emerged from several hun- 
dred names submitted was Vista, 
which evokes images of positive 
outlook, promise, wholesomeness, 
spectacle; the name is short, easy to 
pronounce, conveniently remem- 
bered and given to colorful graphics. 
Vista is a real word, not a coined 
moniker. Artists took to the name 
immediately and came up with a 
striking blue logo with sunrays 
reaching outward. 
As an afterthought, Stanley point- 
ed out staff members working on 
the name change realized Vista con- 
tains the letters V and I from Victory 
and S and T from St. Therese. A 
neat coincidence. A pleasing name 
that fits well for a hospital. 

Modern medical economics dictat- 
ed that there was no turning back 
once managers from both hospitals 
got together. Merger costs are esti- 




BILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 



mated to reach $17 million. Stanley 
feels it will take two to three years to 
fully establish Vista as an entity on 
its own. 

Grand tree 

Parishioners of St. Gilbert's 
Catholic Church in Grayslake feel 
they have Lake County's tallest light- 
ed Christmas tree. Any challengers? 
The majestic spruce fronting on 
Belvidere Rd. annually is festooned 
with hundreds of lights for the holi- 
days. Each year the job gets more 
difficult because the tree grows that 
much taller. Churchmen enlist help 
from the fire department ladder 
truck to hang the lights. 

Meet me in St. Looie 

Retired Zion banker Jim Hotham, 
well known and respected in north 
eastern Illinois financial circles, and 
his wife, Dec, have become Mis- 
sourians. They relocated to St. 
Louis to be nearer to their grandchil- 
dren. During his active banking 
days, Hotham was a civic dynamo. 



■ ■ TV 

As a World War II Navy fighter pilot, 
he took special interest In affairs of 
the Lake County Council of the U.S. 
Navy League. 

Basketball fan 

While signing autographs at the 
Lake Villa-LIndenhurst Chamber of 
Commerce Family Expo, legendary 
DePaul University basketball coach 
Ray Meyer related how the 2000- 
2001 season will be special because 
son Joey will be coaching again. 
The Meyer touch will be put on a 
new Chicago professional entry. 
Coach Ray hastens to add that Joey 
is on his own when it comes to 
coaching. "I'm strictly a fan," the fa- 
mous coach stated. Coach Ray al- 
ready is making plans for next sum- 
mer's basketball camp in northern 
Wisconsin. 

Calling all dancers 

A local steering committee is being 
sought to organize a chapter of the 
United States Amateur Ballroom 
Dancers Assn. Those are the 
dancers who slide and glide with 
uncommon grace. Counts me out! 
Interested persons can call 1-800- 
447-9047 for information. 

One man's family 

A landmark birthday gathering 
for Uncle Bob turned out to be 
half feast, half roast — and all fun. 
A number of party-goers were 
itching to get back at a guy who 
revels in good-natured ribbing. 
They got full measure, turning a 
hard-shell guy misty-eyed more 
than a few times. 




LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Trustees avoid public input 



During our recent elec- 
tions, Village of Gurnee 
residents had the oppor- 
tunity to vote on an SO 
million plan to build an outdoor 
family aquatic center. Village of 
Wauconda residents voted on a $6 
million plan to provide senior citi- 
zen housing. Village of Fox Lake res- 
idents voted on $4.85 million of vil- 
lage hall improvements and the 
Wauconda Park District residents 
voted on $4.5 million to construct a 
family aquatic center. 

The voters in these villages re- 
jected and approved some of these 
spending projects. 

At a Libertyville Village Board 
meeting on Oct. 24, at 1 a.m. with no 
public or reporters present, our Vil- 
lage of Ubertyville Trustees voted to 
spend up to $25 million dollars 
without our approval to build a 
sports and golf learning complex at 
Peterson Rd. and Rt. 45. 

The sports and golf learning 
center may very well be what the 
majority of Libertyville residents 



want but I believe the mayor and vil- 
lage board should have the decency 
to ask us. 

I personally have been opposed 
to the removal of the commercial 
property tax generating property 
from the tax rolls. We understand 
Libertyville High School wants more 
money as a tax rate increase to oper- 
ate the second high school in Ver- 
non Hills. They will ask us in a Feb- 
ruary referendum. I would like to 
ask the Village Board how they pro- 
pose to make up the millions of dol- 
lars of future tax dollars that could 
flow to our schools if the 48 acres 
were allowed to develop according 
to our comprehensive plan and the 
new zoning code. 

Jack L. Martin 
Libertyville 

Public Trust 

Now that the election is over 
and the truth-swinging far flung, 
we can rake up our chards before 
winter settles in and return to our 
daily activities without further re- 



flection, or can wc? I suggest oth- 
erwise. 1 suggest that we need to 
be as vigilant as ever and awaken 
to the political abuse of power, es- 
pecially when it occurs between 
elections. 

Most politicians utilize power as 
intended, to secure resources for 
projects which meet the needs and 
interests of their constituencies. Cit- 
izens, however, also engage in poli- 
tics. And therein, lies the strength 
and fragility of democracy. As citi- 
zens, we are duty bound to be politi- 
cal, yet we might not be prepared for 
it or would rather run to the hills 
without looking back. Yet, citizen 
politics impacts us, regardless of our 
wishes, and it impacts us most 
vividly at the Local level. 

My husband and I tend to 
speak our opinions publicity on a 
range of issues from taxes to deer 
management. My husband even 
ran for a school board position. 
Although he lost, he gained great 

. Please, see LETTERS / B5 



■ 



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December 1, 2000 



OPINIONS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B5 




1, 






LINES 



PARTY LINES, THE LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS' COLUMN OF 
POLITICAL OPINION, IS PREPARED FROM STAFF REPORTS. 



AT A GLANCE 



Townships engaging in passport business 



F 



our Lake County townships are 
equipped to process passport appli- 
cations and renewals. 

Providing local service for the U.S. 
Dept of State are Lake Villa, Vernon, Shields 
and Antioch townships. 

Township personnel are required to 
take training provided by the federal gov- 
ernment before handling passport matters. 
"We're happy to provide this additional 
service. People like the convenience of com- 
ing to a local office," observed Lake Villa 
Township Supervisor Sue Hanson. 

In passport matters, a personal appear- 
ance is required by any applicant 13 years of 
age or older. No exceptions permitted, 
township personnel stated. 

Pool players 

In a pre-Thanksgiving holiday meeting, 
the Village of Lincolnshire began investigat- 
ing the need for a public pool. 

Second life 

Aid. John Bolen, a veteran battler of 
County Board political wars, is enjoying a 
second political life fighting for a Waukcgan 
casino gambling boat. It's a battle Balen 
loves— pitting a blue collar community 
against big money interests. Balen, a Demo- 
crat and one-time union leader, has the 
green light from city council members to 
challenge the Illinois Gaming Board to live 
up to the original intent of uplifting eco- 
nomically depressed towns with casino 
gambling. 

Veterans leaving 

A new era is about to begin on the Lake 




Hansen: Lake 
Villa Township 
assisting in 
processing 
pasports 



Tepper: 

In-line for job 
in Phil Crane's 
office? 



County Board with the departure of two 
long-time Republican members. County 
Chairman Jim Lafielle (R-Zion) is leaving 
by choice to join a Chicago public policy 
think tank. County Rep. Bob Grever (R- 
Lake Zurich) is leaving by choice of the elec- 
tors who voted him out of office. Both La- 
Belle and Grever were the recipients of plau- 
dits and warm going-away parties. Grever 
will continue to hold a public office, super- 
visor of Ela Township. The Ela Township 
leader also is a former County Board chair- 
man. 

Higher and higher 

Like clock-work, Gurnee village 
trustees annually (or almost annually) vote 
new height variances so Six Flags Great 
America can install a new thrill ride. Mayor 
Dick Welton calls the exercise part of 
Gurnee's on-going economic development. 



The new ride will be five feet higher. 

Running— almost 

"I love my job." That's the answer of 
Shields Township Supervis or Chuck 
Fitzgerald to the question about his plans 
for re-election. Officially, Shields Township 
officials are putting the finishing touches on 
an announcement. Fitzgerald has made a 
career of public service, including govern- 
ment work in Washington, DC from 1989 to 
1994 and a stint on the staff of Congressman 
John Porter. 

Short terms 

Two "lame ducks" were elected direc- 
tors of the Lake County Municipal League 
for the 2000-01 term. Leaving public office 
next April will be County Board Chairman 
Jim LaBelle (R-Zion) andWaukegan Mayor 
BlHDurkin. 

Other directors include Mayor 
Thomas Adams, Green Oaks; Mayor- 
Ralph Davis, Round Lake Beach; Mayor 
Ha Bauer, Round Lake Park; Gurnee Ad- 
ministrator fames Hayner; Mayor Mari- 
lyn Slndies, Mundelein; Mayor Duane 
Laska, Libertyville, and Mayor James 
Krischke, Lake Zurich. 

Tepper traveling? 

Warren Township Trustee Wendy 
Tepper has resigned, giving rise to specu- 
lation she might be in line for a staff posi- 
tion with Congressman Phil Crane (R- 
8th) that will take her out of town. Tepper, 
a resident of Arbor Vista, has been active 
on the Crane team as a coordinator and 
scheduler. 



From David-Goliath to Bears-Packers 



Nothing gets the blood boiling like 
history's great feuds, such as David 
vs. Goliath, Harvard vs. Yale, Bush 
vs. Gore, and the Bears vs. the 
Packers. 

That last one will be renewed again Sun- 
day, Dec. 3, at Soldier Field in Chicago. Fans 
of both teams already are beginning to glare 
and growl at each other. 

The Bears defeated their hated rivals 27- 
24 in their first battle this season, Oct. 1 in 
Green Bay. Neither team is setting the league 
on fire, so titles aren't at stake. Just bragging 
rights. 

Everyone who has been introduced to the 
Bible remembers the David vs. Goliath yam. 
Goliath, a gigantic Philistine, challenged the Is- 
raelites. At 6 cubits (9 feet) he was bigger than 
today's football linemen, and grumpier, too. 

Young David, the future king of the an- 
cient Hebrews but no bigger than Doug Flu- 
tie, accepted the challenge and killed Goliath 
with a stone from a sling. 

The Bible doesn't say whether David's 
loincloth was blue and orange {Chicago Bears 
colors) or green and gold (Packers colors) but 
apparently he could sling a stone as rapidly 
and accurately as Brett Favre slings a football. 

For those who will be glued to Sunday's 




THE PFARR 
CORNER 

Jerry Pfarr 



game, the alternative to being right there in 
Soldier Field (where in December many are 
cold but few are frozen, if you will pardon the 
pun) is television. 

Some couch spuds will watch from home 
while others will seek bar stools at their fa- 
vorite taverns. 

There are almost as many Green Bay fans 
as Chicago fans in these parts. Those clad in 
green and gold will gadier at one end of the 
bar, hurling insults at folks in Bears colors, 
and vice versa. 

It's all in good fun, of course. Just check 
your slingshots at the door. 

I have been shopping for my wardrobe for 
the big game and notice that jerseys just like 
those the players are wearing can cost as 
much as $35. 

A green-and-gold Packers helmet, auto- 
graphed by quarterback Favre, costs S600. Or 



a Bears helmet, signed by their questionable 
quarterback Cade McNown, $280. 

However, wearing a football helmet to 
church on Sunday is frowned upon, even 
though some view a Bears-Packers game as a 
religious experience. 

For example, there was a church up in 
Green Bay with a sign outside that said: "Foot- 
ball is only a game. Spiritual things are eter- 
nal. Nevertheless, beat the Bears!" 

The ultimate Packer-fan head wear, of 
course, is the cheese-wedge hat, costing only 
about $20. Wliile Illinois people consider it a 
put-down when they call a Wisconsin person 
a cheesehead, wearing the weird wedge is a 
slaphappy way of laughing it off. 

■Bears rooters can be quite rude; they like 
to claim there is a highway sign up in Wiscon- 
sin that says, "End of the World 4 miles, Green 
Bay 7." 

There also is this old joke: 

The boss tells a guy he is being trans- 
ferred to Green Bay. The guy says, "Oh, no! 
Everyone in Green Bay is either a football 
player or a hooker." 

The boss says, "My wife is from Green 
Bay." 

The guy asks, "Oh, really? What position 
does she play?" 



FROM PAGE B4 



LETTERS 



insight into the political process. He con- 
tinues to be involved. 

Since moving to the area, I have served on 
a village planning commission, co-chaired a 
winning election campaign and served as a 
precinct committeeman. I learned first-hand 
about the high and low roads of politics. 
Above all else, I learned that without politics, 

we can kiss democracy good-bye. 

Betty J. Houbion 
Vernon Hills 

Blame networks 

Want to blame someone for our election 
mess? Look no farther than the TV networks 
that called Florida for Gore a half hour before 
polls closed In the heavily Republican Florida 
"Panhandle." All across the country, thou- 
sands of Bush voters disappeared from voting 



lines while hundreds of distraught Bush vol- 
unteers went home from get out the vote ef- 
forts. A narrow but decisive Bush win in Flori- 
da and the popular vote/electoral college was 
changed into a dead heat. 

Not content with their blatant election 
night manipulation, the networks have 
since served as a uncritical conduit of Gore 
campaign spin. Are we walking about the 
nearly one million Illinois ballots punched 
only for president or how 99 percent of the 
registered voters of one Chicago South Side 
precinct were able to cast 97 percent of 
their "votes" for Gore? Is any network point- 
ing out that most of those 19, 120 "disquali- 
fied votes: in Florida's Palm Beach County 
were actually ballots discarded after voters 
had asked for and were given new ones— 
and that in 1996 (which had a much lower 



voter turn out) more than 15,000 double- 
punched ballots were also discarded in the 
same county? 8,700 voted for Pat Buchanan 
in Palm Beach County in the 1996 primary, 
so why is a 3,400 vote for Buchanan in the 
far bigger 2000 election out of line? Why Is a 
"butterfly" ballot that is used all over the 
country and approved by a Democrat elec- 
tion board suddenly "unfair" in Palm Beach 
County? Why is there no editorial outrage 
over the decision of that county to allow 
"votes" where the punch hole has been 
merely "depressed" on two corners? 

My Democrat neighbors, what if the 
shoe had been on the other foot and the 
networks called Tennessee for Bush one 
half hour before the polls closed in the 
western portion of the state, hours before 
polls closed in California? Aren't you just 
the tiny bit suspicious that the same big city 
bosses punching holes for Gore in the gen- 
eral election did the same thing against Bill 
Bradley in the primary? 

Grant Noble 
Lake Forest 






A DIGEST OF STORIES 

MAKING HEADLINES 

THROUGHOUT OUR REGION 

Stop blaming Davis, others 

Round take— Dr. Dennis R. Conti, superin- 
tendent of Woodland Consolidated Dist. 50, War- 
ren Township, offered the support of superinten- 
dents of county schools to help the Round Lake 
Area Unit District dig out of its financial difficulties, 
"Ensuring a healthy future for die Round Lake Dis- 
trict Is die responsibility of parents, state legisla- 
tors, school employees, school board members, lo- 
cal officials and the superintendent," wrote Conti 
in a letter speaking for all superintendents. He 
called for a stop in blaming Supt. Mary Davis, 
teachers, board members and the mayor. "Pull to- 
gether to find a solution," Conti declared. 

Applicants sought 

Fox Lake— Ingrid Enriquez, execuUve director 
of the Fox Waterway Agency, announced that three 
seats on the 27-person advisory committee will be 
filled from volunteers who apply by letter before 
Dec. 15. By agency rules,* those selected will repre- 
sent a McHenry County homeowner, a Lake Coun- 
ty resident and a Lake County marina owner. 

Man rescued 

Fox Lake— Firefighters successfully rescued a 
man trapped up to his chest in sand due to a sand 
hopper accident 

The Fox Lake Fire Dept received the call at 
1 I'M am. on Nov. 24 after learningthat there was 
a man trapped in sand offa Rte. 12 worksite. 

"He was up to his neck in sand. We used shov- 
els, hands and shored up the sand. We also used a 
street vacuum — that helped out a lot," said Cap- 
tain Cynthia Becht of the Fox Lake Fire Dept 

The victim, Randy Norgard, 46, of Richmond, 
was conscious the entire time, but had chest pains 
and difficulty breathing. Following the incident, he 
was transported to Lutheran General Hospital in 
Park Ridge, 

The equipment is owned by Super Mix and 
Spruce Lake Sand and Gravel of Spring Grove. A 
spokesman for the company praised the fire de- 
partment fordoing a good job, but did not make 
any additional comments. 

Police arrest 14 at party 

Grays! ake — Grayslake Police arrested 14 
people at an apartment party after a complaint 
of loud noise was received Nov. 25 at 12:28 a.m. 

Jeremy M. Stegmiller, 22, oflfll5 Country 
Dr. Apt 204, and Kyle J. Graves, 19, of the same 
address, were charged with contributing to mi- 
nor consumption of alcohol, attempted ob- 
struction of justice, unlawful permit of minor 
intoxication and unlawful delivery of alcohol to 
minors, when police broke up an underage 
drinking party at their apartment 

Also arrested was Robert K. Scisson, 19, 270 
Danburry Dr. in Vernon Hills, for possession of 
drug paraphernalia and underage consump- 
tion of alcohol. 

Eleven other subjects from Vemon Hills, 
Libertyville, Mundelein, Gumee and Salem, 
Wis. were arrested for unlawful consumption of 
alcohol by a minor 

Village plans for tax levy 

libertyville— Village anticipates receiving a 
total levy of $3,905,798 in 200 property tax revenue. 

The levy could result in a property tax rate of 
$0,549, less than the 1999 tax rate of $0,552. The 
impact on a Libertyville homeowner would be a 
2.5% increase in property taxes. The proposed levy 
continues the village's practice of decreasing the 
debt service for all alternate revenue bonds. A 
$ 120,000 reduction from the county is included for 
the townships road and bridge tax. 

Cops pay agreement wins nod 

Foot Lake— A resolution was agreed to by the 
collective bargaining agreement between the Vil- 
lage of Fox Lake and the Illinois Fraternal Order of 
Labor. 

The pact was signed by both parties. It ends 
multi-years of negotiation between the village and 
thel5-memberFOR , 

"It took longer than we hoped, but that hap- 
pens when you deal with new ground. Nothing 
happens as quickly as you would like. We are 
pleased and happy that the negotiations have re- 
sulted in an agreement that is satisfactory to both 
parties," said Fox Lake Mayor James Pappas. "We 
truly value the service the officers provide for our 
community." 

Dist. 116 faces empty account 

Round Lake— Round Lake area schools 
could be without teachers If $2 million tax antici- 
pation warrant is not obtained. 

Despite $23 million in cuts during the sum- 
mer and fall, die district is running out of funds. 
Underwriter Harris Bank of Chicago is reluctant to 
issue the warrant fearing the district will be unable 
to repay. 

$85,000 house fire damage 

Wauconda— The congregation of aWaucon- 
da church is helping and praying for the family of 
one of its leaders. 

The Evangelical Free Church youth pastorTyd 
Rogers and his family and one guest escaped un- 
hurt from a house fire in the early morning hours 
of Nov. 24. 

Wauconda Fire Dept estimates a total of 
$85,000 in damage was done at 27131 Anderson Rd. 




CONDELL HEALTH 
NETWORK 

Centre Lights Cafe 

On Monday, Dec. 4 - 4 to 8 p.m., Centre 
Lights Cafe at Centre Ciub, 200 W. Golf Rd., 
Libertyville, serves "Centre Lights Seniors" 
dinner at $6 a person every Monday, 573- 
4373. 

Sleep Disorders Center 

On Tuesday, Dec. 5 at 7 p.m., Condell's 
Sleep Disorders Center sponsors Northern 
Illinois chapter of AWAKE (Alert, Well And 
Keeping Energetic), the national organiza- 
tion for individuals who experience sleep- 
disordered breathing. Any person who has 
a history of sleep apnea, is currently being 
treated with CPAP, BiPAP, or has under- 
gone surgery for any sleep disorder, is invit- 
ed. 362-2905, ext. 5187. 

The Looking Up Bereavement 
Support Group 

On Wednesday, Dec. 6 at 7 p.m.. The 
Looking Up Bereavement Support Group is 
an ongoing program sponsored by Condell 
Medical Center Hospice. This session in the 
Living Room of the Condell Day Center for 
Intergenerational Care is open to the public 
for listening, talking and sharing feelings. 
816-8848. 

LAKE FOREST HOSPITAL 

Curious and Eager: Baby's On 
The Move! 

Learn what activities encourage 10- to 12- 
month-olds' natural fascination with the 
world of objects. Topics include language 
development, encouraging independence 
and setting limits. 

Breast Cancer Support Group 

Meets the second Tuesday of each month 
from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in the administrative 
conference room. Call 535-6445. 

VICTORY MEMORIAL 
HOSPITAL 

Holiday Arts and Crafts Festival 

On Saturday, December 2, from 9 a.m.-4 
p.m., the Holiday Arts and Crafts Festival . 
will be held at Victory Lakes Continuing 
Care Center, 1055 East Grand Avenue, Lin- 
denhurst. Area crafters present American 
Girl™ clothing, nutcrackers, clocks, stained 
glass, leather, clothing, jewelry, toys and 
Santas and snowmen among other items 
for holiday gift giving and home decor. 
Light luncheon available. Call 356-5900 for 
more information. 

Community Blood Drive 

On Wednesday, December 6, from 1 1 
a.m.- 6 p.m., a Community Blood Drive will 
be held in conjunction with the Village of 
Lindenhurst at the Victory Surgery and 
Treatment Center, 1050 Red Oak Lane (on 
the Victory Lakes campus off Grand Av- 
enue), Lindenhurst. For the most conve- 
nience, make an appointment by calling 1- 
888-869-1 1 18. Walk-in donations will also 
be accepted. 

PROVENA SAINT 
THERESE MEDICAL 
CENTER 

Effective Discipline With Younger 
Children Seminar 

On Thursday, December 7, at 7 p.m., a 
free Effective Discipline with Younger Chil- 
dren Seminar will be held at Provena Saint 
Therese Medical Center, 22615 Washington 
Street, Waukcgan. This program will pro- 
vide an introduction to 1 -2-3 Magic! To reg- 
ister and for more information, call 360- 
2280. 

Cholesterol Screenings 

On Monday, December 4, from 8:30-10:30 
a.m., Cholesterol Screenings will be held at 
Provena Saint Therese Medical Center, 
2615 Washington Street, Waukegan. 
Choose from a Total Cholesterol and Glu- 
cose Screen, $10, or a Total Cholesterol, 
HDL, LDL, Ratio and Tryglycrides Screen, 
$25. Appointment required. Call 1-888-869- 
1 1 18 to make an appointment. 



HEALT 




B6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



December!, 2000 



Common childhood infection nothing to sneeze at for preemies 

Protect your children during RSV season 



Each year, pediatricians and hospital 
pediatric units brace themselves for RSV 
(Respiratory Syncytial Virus) season, when 
many babies contract RSV and may become 
seriously ill from this common respiratory 
infection. Parents orat-risk newborns need 
to the aware that protection from this po- 
tentially harmful virus is available and they 
should call their doctor for more informa- 
tion. 

The RSV virus is a common cause of 
lower respiratory infections in premature 
infants. Half of all children develop an RSV 
infection by the age of one year; by age two, 
virtually all children have had RSV. For most 
otherwise healthy children, RSV usually 
amounts to little more than a cold. Howev- 
er, for at-risk infants, such as infants born 
prematurely and children under the age of 
two suffering from chronic lung conditions, 
the health consequences can be much more 
serious. 

A little known fact is that up to 125,000 
children under the age of one year are hos- 
pitalized annually due lo RSV-relatcd ill- 
nesses and up to 2% of these children may 
die. The cost of treating a child hospitalized 
for RSV-relatcd illnesses can be over 
$70,000, This is why it is the utmost impor- 
tance that parents take steps to protect their 
premature babies for RSV. 

"RSV is a common infection and is a fre- 
quent cause of childhood hospitalization 
and intensive care unit admissions. In pre- 
mature babies and infants with lung dis- 
ease, the virus can produce severe and last- 
ing complications that may place the child's 
life at risk. Many parents are not aware that 
their babies are at-risk for RSV, so education 
about this disease is extremely important. 
Parents should talk with their pediatrician 



about ways to help prevent and protect 
their babies from RSV" said Dr. Stephen A. 
Chartrand, Professor and Chairman, De- 
partment of Pediatrics, Director, Division of 
Pediatric Infectious Disease at the 
Creighton University School of Medicine. 

RSV spreads easily from person to per- 
son via sneezing, coughing, or from contact 
with a person or object that carries the 
virus. The chance of spreading the virus 
within a family is very high. Many times 
school-aged children introduce the virus 
into the family. Despite strict infection con- 
trol procedures, hospital nursery units, day 
care centers and other similar institutions 
are also at high-risk for RSV outbreaks. 

The symptoms of RSV may be like a cold 
at first and can include fever, runny nose, 
and other cold-like symptoms. An infected 
baby might get sicker very quickly. Symp- 
toms may include: coughing, difficulty 
breathing, wheezing (a whistling sound}, 
rapid breathing, and a blue color around 
the lips. Since RSV complications can strike 
rapidly, parents of at-risk children need to 
know to act fast — to call their pediatrician 
or healthcare provider immediately if signs 
of RSV complications appear. 

Simple steps parents can take to help 
reduce their baby's risk of exposure to the 
RSV virus include: 

•Have family members and caregivers 
wash their hands with warm water and soap 
before touching the baby. 

•Limit the baby's exposure to people 
with cold symptoms or fevers. 

•Keep the baby away from crowded - 
places 

•Do not smoke around the baby 

•Talk to your child's pediatrician about 
preventive measures and medication. 



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Synagis® {palivizumab), is a medication 
designed to help prevent RSV. The first 
monoclonal antibody to be licensed for any 
infectious disease, Synagis is the only prod- 
uct to deliver safe and effective RSV protec- 
tion with a simple intramuscular injection, 
which can be administered in the health- 
care provider's office once a month during 
the RSV season. 

The most frequently reported adver.se 
events potentially related to synagis were 
fever, nervousness and injection site reac- 
tion. Adverse events that occured in >l% or 
the Synagis group and for. which the inci- 
dence was >1% than in the placebo group 
included upper respiratory infection, otitis 
media, rhinitis, rash, pain, hernia, increase 
in SGOT and pharyngitis. 

For more information about RSV, par- 
ents can call 1-877-04B-8512 or visit the RSV 
web site at www.rsvprotection.com 

Gamma radiation 
may stop artery clots 
more effectively 

Patients who undergo a procedure lo 
open clogged heart arteries may benefit from 
a combination of gamma radiation and long- 
term drug therapy to prevent the regrowth of 
blockages in the same arteries, according to 
physicians at Loyola University medical Cen- 
ter, Maywood, IL. 

Loyola is among only about 30 centers in 
the nation — and the only institution in the 
Chicago area — to participate in the study 
and offer gamma radiation as an experimen- 
tal therapy for this kind of heart treatment. 
The objective is to determine whether a 
blocked heart artery that has been cleaned 
using a non-surgical procedure known as an- 
gioplasty will remain open if the artery is 
treated with a minimal dose of gamma radia- 
tion and the patient is placed on six months 
of medication. 

The gamma-radiation treatment is limit- 
ed to patients who have been accepted into 
the study and is not currently approved for 
general clinical use. 

The project is being led locally by Drs. 
Fred Leya, director of interventional cardiolo- 
gy at Loyola, and Rahman Emami, Loyola's 
chairman and professor of radiation therapy. 
Cordis Corporation, maker of instruments 
and supplies for angioplasty procedures, is 
coordinating the study nationally. 

The first Loyola patients were expected to 
undergo the new therapy on Nov. 2. 

"Recent research has shown that treating 
the artery with a small dose of the less-pow- 
erful beta radiation for several minutes and 
then giving the patient a clot-preventing drug 
for one month is effective in the short term." 
said Dr. Eric Grassman, cardiologist and as- 
sociate professor of medicine in the Loyola 
University Chicago Stritch school of Medi- 
cine. 

A third or more patients who undergo 
angioplasty, a non-surgical procedure to 
clear obstructed heart arteries, will develop 
restenosis, a condition in which the cells on 
the inside wall of the artery multiply uncon- 
trollably and grow in the area where the ob- 
struction was removed. This cellular growth 
can plug the same artery within a few months 
following angioplasty, forcing a patient to un- 
dergo a second procedure or opt for open- 
heart surgery. 

Particularly at risk for the regrowth of 
blockages are diabetic patients two have a 
stent, a miniature, flexible tube that is shaped 
like the spring in the ballpoint pen and is 
placed inside the artery after a blockage has 
been removed in order to keep the artery 
open. 

The cells have a tendency to grow inside 
the stent, thereby creating a new blockage in 
the artery, Grassman said. 

The federal Food and Drug Administra- 
tion has given initial approval for physicians' 
use of beta radiation to reduce the rate of 
restenosis in angioplasty patients. This ap- 
proval was based on earlier clinical studies, in 
which Loyola also participated and which 
demonstrated that a combination of beta ra- 
diation and approximately one month of fol- 
low-up dmg therapy cut die restenosis rate 
by about a half on a short-term basis. 







B^B^^HBH 



December 1, 2000 



HEALTH WATCH 



Lakeland Newspapers / B7 



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Can distractible behavior be trained? This doctor thinks so! 



HI Dr. Singer,, 

-.1 have been reading your column for 
a long time and I know you r opinion 
about the diagnosing of ADD. I have an 
8 year old daughter and In her class, at 
least half of the kids have been diag- 
nosed and recommended for Ritalin by 
the teacher and school. I believe that all 
the kids recommended for It are on It 
now. They are telling me that my daugh- 
ter needs It too. I do not believe In ADD 
and I do not believe my daughter needs 
this. I have seen my daughter have ex- 
cellent focus and I know that she does 
not have a problem with dlstractlblUty. 
I believe that more likely the classroom 
teacher has no control and no rules and 
kids can get very out of control with that 
lack of discipline In a classroom. I 
wanted to get your "take" on what you 
think Is going on hi our classrooms with 
this. I am burning mad about 1U I have 
many memories from my grade school 
years and one thing I do not remember 
Is having half my class diagnosed with 
an Illness and on medication. Yet, we all 
found a way to focus and concentrate 
and make It through every day without 
misbehaving or going off track. Please 
weigh in! Thank you. Sign me.......Mom 

who's sick of watching our kids being 
medicated! 

Hi Mom, 

While, in many ways, I do feel a lot like 
you do, I want to clarify a few obligatory 
things first and then I will definitely weigh in. 
First, not all teachers think alike. Just as all 
people are different so are all teachers. So 
don't group them all together. I have met 
many teachers who think like you do too. Not 
all teachers are ready to diagnose this prob- 
lem that quickly and easily. Second, I have a 
problem with the idea that a teacher would 
be diagnosing any kind of a Medical or Psy- 
chological condition and I don't believe that 
they do. At least, they shouldn't be. Usually, 
before any comment is made on a condition 
name or recommendation, a School Psychol- 




PARENT'S 
PLACE 

Dr. Sherri Singer 




ogist as well as other professionals, and a 
testing of some kind is involved. A formal di- 
agnosis really should not be happening inde- 
pendently by the teacher. 

With those things said, I also believe that 
the ADD diagnosis is being jumped on very 
quickly these days and by using methods that 
are just not accurate enough. Distractibility 
and off-task behavior can be caused by so 
many things. Everyday I train kids to have 
better focus and to be able to stay with their 
work and what is expected of them. Most of 
the time, I have kids come in who have previ- 
ously been diagnosed ADD and their parents 
have chosen, prior to coming into my office, 
to not medicate their children. I use exercises 
that actually train children to pay attention 
and train parents to teach their kids self-con- 
trol. When I see the impact of these exercises 
and the improvement of the distractibility 
through limits and these exercises, it makes 
me have serious doubts about the whole dis- 
order. 

I also have a serious problem with the 
fact that often, it is a checklist type of inven- 
tory that decides the final diagnosis. I am very 
familiar with those checklists and know that 
the questions asked may load highly on a 
"distractibility scale," but what I question is 
the fact that the behaviors noted may be 
caused by lots of things, only one of which 
might be true distractibility. For example, I 
have had many kids come in who have really 
never learned how to work within the rules. 
One kid in particular had early school train- 
ing that allowed him to get out of his chair 
anytime he wanted to. There were no prob- 
lems with that at his early school level. It was 
expected and normal at the program he was 



in. He had to switch schools, at some point, 
and went into a school that didn't allow get- 
ting up out of your chair. Low and behold, his 
new teacher told his parents that he was ADD 
and needed medication. He was no such 
thing. He simply learned one expectation for 
a long period of time and then took it with 
him to the next school. I would not expect 
that type of situation to right itself without 
some direct intervention into teaching him 
the right way to respond to limits. I have seen 
many other kids who get away with all kinds 
of stuff at home and then think they can do 
the same thing at school. There is virtually no 
punishment that I have seen, for these types 
of behaviors at school and so the behavior 
continues. This is also not about ADD, in my 
estimation. It is more about alack of limits. 
There have to be clear and understandable 
limits in order for kids to be able to have con- 
centration at any level. I believe that there 
also has to be more stringent guidelines for 
deciding what is causing the behavior. 

I also remember my grade school years 
and I agree with you. There weren't many 
misbehaving kids. There wasn't any ADD. We 
didn't misbehave because we knew that there 
would be serious punishment and we didn't 
want to go there. I just don't see that out there 
anymore at all. Now, If I am wrong about 
that, and there are schools who do hold their 
kids responsible for actions, I stand corrected, 
but I meet with an awful lot of people in a 
year, and I have yet to hear about any serious 
consequence posed by a school for behav- 
ioral classroom issues. In fact, I just heard 
about a school who had a t.v. set installed in 
the room that detentions are done in. I rest 
my easel 

What I love the best about what I do is the 
complete changing of these kids in front of 
everyone's eyes. Usually parents are very 
pleased but some teachers get miffed because 
they were certain the child could not be 
helped without medication. We prove them 
wrong every time. Of course, that is provided 
the parent works with me to make the 
changes happen. 

In my estimation, distractibility can have 



many causes. Most of what I have seen tells 
me that it is usually more about a bad habit 
and is a very trainable area. Most of the time 
it just isn't trained so the child keeps getting 
worse and worse. We all know that repeating 
anything makes us better at it. These kids 
who keep repeating the same bad habits be- 
cause no one trains them otherwise are most 
certainly going to continue to present with 
signs of distractibility. But it doesn't have to 
be that way. The longer they practice the bad 
habits, the harder they are to train. But it can 
be done. "Distraction Tolerance", a term I 
have coined, can be achieved through repeti- 
tive practice and parental and teacher limit 
setting. I know it I have watched it happen 
for many years. 

I understand your burning madness 
about this, and I hope my column will help 
you to relax. There are some things you can 
change and some you can't What you can 
change is your child's habits. You can work 
on this and make it better. It is work and an 
investment in time, but not a long time. You 
can call me if you want details. You will prob- 
ably not change the teacher's mind about this 
and I do not believe it is a battle worth taking 
on. Many people feel very strongly one way or 
the other about this. Making an enemy out of 
your child's teacher is not really worthwhile. 
If you cannot deal with the teacher, you could 
always decide to make your child's education 
private. Of course, you'll make your decision. 

I usually recommend that when a parent 
comes up against a difference of opinion re- 
garding the track of treatment, (i.e. medica- 
tion or not,) and parents are absolutely cer- 
tain that they are choosing a non-medication 
path, that the parent always decide to take 
the treatment on in a private way. In other 
words, that parents get integrally involved in 
finding and executing the treatment they feel 
appropriate for their child. 

I believe that teachers often get very upset 
because they have this class of kids they need 
to be able to keep under control and if they 
have a few really "rockin the boat," so to 

Please see SINGER IBB 



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B8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HEALTHWATCH 



Decemberl, 2000 



Abbott Laboratories honors outstanding scientists, 
engineers for scientific excellence, leadership 



Abbott Laboratories today announced 
that 21 Abbott scientists have been inducted 
as new or promoted members of the presti- 
gious Volwiler Society Tor their scientific ex- 
cellence and leadership. 

The Volwiler Society was established by 
Abbott Laboratories in 1985 to recognize the 
company's most distinguished scientists and 
engineers. Named for the late Dr. Ernest H. 
Volwiler, former Abbott president and chair- 
man of the board, the society encourages pro- 
fessional growth and constant pursuit of in- 
novation and scientific discovery. Volwiler is 
recognized in the National Inventors Hall of 
Fame by the U.S. Patent Office for his part in 
the discovery of sodium pentothal, one of the 
world's most widely used anesthetic agents. 



The new appointees bring total membership 
to 104. 

In keeping with Abbott Laboratories' long 
history of social responsibility, in addition to 
individual recognition, outstanding research 
honorecs each receive a monetary award they 
are able to donate to any collage or university 
located in the United States. 

"These awards celebrate Abbott's past, 
present and future, all built on the company's 
continued leadership in science and innova- 
tion. Abbott's markets are changing, and our 
continued success depends on our ability to 
change along with them," said Jeffrey M. Lei- 
den, M.D., executive vice president and chief 
scientific officer, Abbott Laboratories. "This 
year's honorecs demonstrate the powerful 



FROM PAGE B7 



SINGER 



speak, il can get out of hand very quickly. 

They want to avoid thai happening, logi- 
cally and obviously, i always encourage the 
parents I work with to make a commitment to 
let the teacher know that they (the parents) 
are very seriously taking on the symptoms 
and making them better. Usually, if the par- 
ents 1 have worked with present a "battle 
plan" to (he teacher about training the dis- 
tractibility and limits, and the teacher has a 
clear knowledge that parents aren't just let- 
ting it go, while they avoid the recommenda- 
tion for medication, teachers have usually 
been comfortable with that and have allowed 
the process to unfold with very good results. 
Again, for those of you reading this who 
are getting excited about the prospect of 
training distractibility away, you must under- 
stand that it is a commitment issue. Repeti- 
tion is what docs it and it is a process. A suc- 
cessful process, but a process. 1 hope this 



helps. I am glad to speak to you iTyou want to 
call again. 

'Any medication issues should be dis- 
cussed with a Medical Doctor, prior to any 
changes. 

Dr. Slwrri Singer is a Licensed Clinical Psy- 
chologist and Childhood Behavior Specialist. 
She regularly works in person with many read- 
ers of this column, helping them to significant- 
ly improve their kid's behavior and learning 
skills fast. Among many other services, she of- 
fers a "Parent Survival Training" class for par- 
ents. It lasts 3 weeks and has helped countless 
families to restore good behavior to their kids 
and peace and quiet to their homes! She is the 
author of, "Why Kids Misbehave" and "Raising 
Kids Who Don't Become Your Worst Night- 
mare." For an appointment or to purchase ei- 
ther of Dr. Singer's books, please call (847) 577- 
8832 or (708) 962-2549. 



+2000 Hedthy Habits t 

C A L E N / D A R 



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At Midwestern Regional Medical Center 



Support Group: Breast Cancer Support Group 

Monday, December 4 7:00 - 8:00 p.m. 

A support group for women affected by breast cancer. Share expe- 
riences, explore ideas, and express your feelings among a group 
of women who know what you're going through because they've 
been there too. This group meets at Midwestern Regional Medical 
Center in Zion. For more information and to register, please call 
847/872-6362. 




Midwesterna ^ 

R E (i I Q N A t. M V. I) I C A I. C E N T F. R 



For more information and to register for any Healthy Habits program, 

please call 847/856-1220 



Participating Providers: 



Waukcgan 

Family & Internal Medicine 

Dr. Pedro Palu-ay 

Dr. Loyla Soils 

Dr. Daisy Andalcon 

2504 Washington Ave. 

847/249-1733 



Zion 

Family & Internal Medicine 

Dr. Pedro Palu-ay 

Dr. Leyla Soils 
Dr. Daisy Andalcon 
2G0G Elisha ' 
847/872-4558 



Lakr- Villa 
Family & Internal Medicine 

Dr. Pedro Palu-ay 

Dr. Daisy Andalcon 

300 N. Milwaukee Ave. 

847/35G-GG02 



Llndcnliursl 

Internal Medicine 

Dr. Piiilimia Dcvenncy 

2045 E. Grand Ave 

847/35GGI31 



Curtice 

Cancer Resource Center 

Curtice Mills, Entrance 1! 

6170 VV. Grand Ave. 

847/85G-1220 



Curnce 

Internal Medicine 

Dr. CI) ills Vaslii 

25 Tower Court 

847/2G39900. 



combination of dedication, expertise and cre- 
ativity that leads to real innovation." 

A committee of Abbott's scientific leaders 
elects and promotes members of the society. 
Candidates are evaluated on their ingenuity, 
scientific excellence, consistent productivity 
and performance at Abbott. There are four 
levels of membership: associate research fel- 
low, research fellow, senior research fellow 
and distinguished research fellow. A list of all 
new and promoted Volwiler Society members 
and their hometowns follows: Steven A. Buck- 
ncr, Wadsworth; Sanjay Chcmburkar, Ph.D, 
Gurnee; Robert K. Ramm, Ph.D., Lake Villa; 
Timothy P. Henning, Ph.D., Vernon Hills; 



Robert K. Hickman, Ph.DL, Mundelein; 
Michael F. Jarvis, Ph.D., Vemon Hills; Steven 
A. King, Ph.D., Gurnee; Gregory T. Maine, 
Ph.D., Gurnee; BA Narayanan, Ph.D., 
Mundelein; Jeffrey Y. Pan, Ph.D., Lake Forest; ' 
Rajagopatan Raghavan, Ph.D., Grayslake; 
Gary Wang, Ph.D., Niles. Promoted to re- 
search fellow are: Richard W. Grabenkort, 
Barrington; Larry L Klein, Ph.D., Lake Forest; 
Phillip G. Mattingly, Ph.D., Grayslake. 

Abbott Laboratories is a global, diversified 
health care company devoted to the discov- 
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www.cancercenter.com 



Waukegan 

Family Medicine 

Glen Flora Medical Clinic 

Dr. Campo Sncscaii 

935 Glen Flora Ave. 

847/249-3322 



Zion 

Midwestern Regional 

Medical Center 

Cancer Treatment Centers 

ofAmerica 

2520 Elisha Ave, 

847/872-45G1 



Put your Pain in the 
hands of a specialist! 



DR. SCOTT REISER 
ROUND LAKE BEACH CHIROPRACTIC 

If any of these symptoms sound familiar, let us help you: 

* Headaches * Lower Back Pain * Sport Injuries 

* Neck Pain or Stiffness or Pain * Whiplash 

* Mid-Back Pain * Numbness or Pain * Auto or Work 

in Arms or Legs Related Injuries 

(847) 740-2800 

314 W. Rollins Rd. t Round Lake Beach, IL 

Auto mid Work Related Injuries Excluded, But Covered 10O% 




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NEW PATIENT 
$25 X-RAY & EXAM 

Round Lake Beach Chiropractic . Expires 12/31/00 l 



At Cancer Resource Center 

• ■ •■ • ■ . ■ 



Mammogram: $49 

All month, by appointment 
Shop for your health! visit our Gurnee Mills loca- 
tion and have your mammogram performed by a 
caring and conscientious imaging specialist. The 
$49 cost includes interpretation of your mammo- 
gram by a Board-certified radiologist. Results will 
be sent to your physician. Weekday and weekend 
appointments arc available. For more informa- 
tion, or to schedule an appointment, please call 
847/856-1220. 

Nutritional Counseling Service: 

All month, by appointment 
A doctor of holistic nutrition who specializes in 
complementary nutritional therapy is available for 
in-pcrson or telephone consultation. This is a 
personalized service for anyone who wants to 
learn more about the role of nutrition in disease 
prevention, treatment or recovery. From cancer 
prevention to weight control, your individualized, 
scientifically based program will promote optimal 
health and benefit for the whole family. For 
details regarding our nutritional services, or to 
make an appointment, please call 847/85G-1220. 

Free Assessment: Breast Cancer 
Risk Assessment 

All month 

Let a staff member at Cancer Resource Center 
help you determine your risk of developing breast 
cancer. Just answer a few short questions and a 
computer generated assessment tool will estimate 
your breast cancer risk over (he next five years 
and during your lifetime. Please note that (his 
assessment is for information purposes only and 
should not replace routine mammograms or reg- 
ular clinical breast exams. For more information, 
please call 847-85G-1220. 



Relax! With Reflexology by Relaxus 

Friday, December 4 ..10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. 

Reflexology is an age old holistic healing tech- 
nique that works to balance all body systems by 
stimulating underactive areas and calming overac- 
tive areas. Utilizing a team approach, Bill and Kay 
Furlong, certified reflexologists, work together 
applying specific pressure techniques using the 
thumb, fingers and hand on the reflexes of the feet 
and hands. Treat yourself to a 15 minute Intro- 
ductory session Tor just $20. Space is limited. 
Please call 847/856-1220 to reserve. an appoint- 
ment time. 

Free Talk: Holiday Survival Foods 

Thursday, December 7 7:00 - 8:00 p.m. 

Its that time of year again! Great times that include 
great foods and spirits. This presentation and 
cooking demonstration will provide attendees 
with healthy holiday survival lips, as well as 
recipes to give the holidays a healthy twist. Please 
call 847/85G-1220 to register. 

Free Screening: Colorectal Cancer 
Take Home Test 

Tuesday, December 1210:00 a.m. - 12 noon 

Colorectal cancer Is one of the most frequently 
diagnosed cancers affecting men and woman over 
the age or 40. One of the early warning signs, hid- 
den blood in the stool, may be detected by using a 
simple do-at-ftome lest. Visit the Cancer Resource 
Center during the above hours and receive your 
free screening lest kit with Instructions for use. To 
reserve a colorectal home test, please call 
847/850-1220. 

Free Health Screening: Blood Pressure 

Saturday, December 3010:00 a.m. - 12 noon 

Have your blood pressure checked by a healthcare 
professional. To register, please call 847/856-1220. 




CANCER 
TREATMENT 
CENTERS 
OFAMERICA 8 

Winning the fight against cancer, every day." 



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December 1, 2000 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B9 






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James C. Shepherd 

Age 25 of Gurnec, passed away Monday, Nov. 20, 2000 at his residence. He was born 
Aug. 21, 1975 in Waukegan and was raised in Round Lake, 

He leaves his wife, Jamie Shepherd; parents, Marvin tLInda) Shepherd of Ironwood, 
Mich, sister, Rebecca Shepherd; brother, Gerrett Shepherd all of Ironwood, Mich. 

Friends of the family visited at the Strang Funeral Chapel and Crematorium Ltd., 
Grayslake on Nov, 24. 

Interment was privately held in Michigan. 

Charles 'Carl' E Vesdsky 

Age B6 of Antioch, passed awayTuesday, Nov. 21, 2000 at his home. He was born Jan. 
21, 1914 in Cicero, the son of the late Charles and Mary (Novotny) Veselsky, Before his 
retirement he worked as a steel fitter In the electro motive division of General Motors In La 
Grange and was a member of the UAW. 

Survivors Include his wife, Virginia; one son, Charles (Marie) of Aurora; two brothers, 
Irvin (Lillian) and Raymond (Helen) Veselsky and two sisters, Geraldlne (Edward) Kucaba 
and Adeline Blim. 



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^^11^ Funeral Directory 



-■L.J-; PBVi MM 



JUSTEN'S ROUND LAKE 
FUNERAL HOME 

222'N. RosedaJe Court 

(Rosedale at Cedar Lake Road) 

(847) 546-3300 

Nancy Justen & 

Mark Justen, 

Directors 

Additional Locations in 

McHenry and 

Wonder Lake 

K.K. HAMSHER FUNERAL 
HOME, LTD. 

12 N. Pistakee Lake Rd., 

Fox Lake, IL 

(847)587-2100 

Kenneth K. Hamsher, 

Debra Hamsher Glen, 

Directors 

RINGA FUNERAL HOME 

122 S. Milwaukee Ave., 

Lake Villa, IL 

(847) 356-2146 

Robert J. Ringa, Jr. 



SPRING GROVE FUNERAL 
CHAPEL 

8103Wilmot Rd., RO. Box 65, 
Spring Grove, IL 60081 

(815) 675-0550 
Toll Free (888) 394-8744 
Kurk P. Paleka, Director 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St., Antioch, IL 

(847) 395-4000 
Dan Dugenske, Director 

STRANG FUNERAL CHAPEL 
AND CREMATORIUM, LTD. 

410 E. Delvidere Grayslake, IL 

(847) 223-8122 

David G. Strang and Richard A 

Gaddis, Directors 

SYMONDS-LAKES 
FUNERAL HOME 

1 1 1 W. Delvidere Grayslake, IL 

(847)543-1080 

Matthew J. Symonds, Director 

Additional Locations in 

Chicago & Highwood 



Memorial Funeral Services were held Nov, 26 at the 
Strang Funeral Home of Antioch. 

Friends visited from 11 a.m., Nov. 26, until the time of 
services. 

In Ifeu of flowers donations may be made to the 
American Cancer Society In his memory. 

Br (ii da J. Leever 

Age 55 of Bristol, Wis. passed away Tuesday, Nov. 21, 
2000 at Kenosha Hospital Medical Center, Kenosha, Wis. She 
was bom July 21, 1945 in Chicago, the daughter of John and 
Florence (Domallle) Loulsch. 

Survivors Include her husband, William; two sons, 
George and Edward both of Richmond; her mother, 
Florence Loutsch Dvorak of Gages Lake; one brother, John 
(Joyce) Loutsch of Mauston, Wis.; one sister, Linda (Frank) 
Troglia of Woodstock. 

Funeral Services were held Nov. 27 at the Strang Funeral 
Home of Antioch. 

Interment was at Hillside Cemetery, Antioch. 

Karen S. Daniel 

Age 40, passed away unexpectedly, Wednesday, Nov. 22, 
2000 at the Condell Medical Center, Libertyville. She was 
born In Columbia, SC, the daughter of Marshal and Beatrice 
(Vogel) Daniel. She was employed by the ONEAC Corp. in 
Libertyville. 

Karen will be missed by her two brothers, Wayne 
(Laura) Daniel of Round Lake and Gary of Joliet; one sister, 
BrendaToms in California; and her adoptive parents, Melvin 
and Vicky Hood of Linden hurst. 

Memorial Services weie held Nov. 26 at the Strang 
Funeral Chapel and Crematorium Ltd., Grayslake. 

Interment was private. 

Kenneth Day Martens Sr. 

Age 79 of Lake Villa, passed away Saturday, Nov. 25, 2000 
at Condell Medical Center, Libertyville. He was bom on Nov. 
IB, 1921 in Chicago the son of William D. and Edith 
(Gartzke) Martens Sr. For 43 years he owned and operated 
Martens Fencing in Lake Villa. 

He Is survived by his wire, Emma of Lake Villa; his two 
sons, Kenneth D. (Candlce) Martens of Lake Villa and John 
(Frieda) Martens of, Skokie; his two daughters, Louise 
(Kevin) Newcomer of Silver Spring, MD, Lydia (Alan) 
Cernlckof New Buffalo, Mich. 

Visitation was on Nov. 28 and Funeral Services were 
held Nov. 29 at the Strang Funeral Chapel and Crematorium 
Ltd., Grayslake with Rev. Sidney Miller officiating. 

Interment was at Willow Lawn Memorial Park, Vernon 
Hills. 

In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorials be 
made In Kenneth's name to the Indian Hill Chapel, 36133 N. 
Fairchlld Rd, Ingleside. 

Edward C. Fenters 

Age 82 of Grayslake passed away on Monday, Nov. 
20, 2000 at his home. Formerly of Waukegan. he 
has been a resident of Grayslake for the past 32 
years. Edward proudly served his country with the 
U.S. Navy during WWII and the Korean Conflict retiring 
from the Navy in 1957. He retired as Captain from the Great 
Lakes Fire Dept. in 1977 after 20 years of service. 

He leaves his wife, Lois (Nee Fisher); daughter, Betty 
(Henry) Sneyd of Grayslake; sons, Craig (Rita) Fenters of 
Llndenhurst and Scott Fenters of Grayslake. 

Funeral Services were hcId"Nov. 22 at Strang Funeral 
Chapel and Crematorium Ltd., Grayslake with the Rev. Bill 
Owen of the United Protestant Church, Grayslake officiat- 
ing. 

Interment followed at Fori Sheridan Cemetery, Fort 
Sheridan. 

In lieu of flowers donations may be given to the United 
Protestant Church, 54 S. Whitney St., Grayslake, IL 60030 or 
Rush Hospice Partners, 660 N. Westmoreland, Lake Forest, 
IL 60045. 

Iinnea G. Schalk 

Age 89 of Grayslake, passed away Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2000 
at Condell Medical Center, Libertyville. She had worked for 
Frank G. Hough for approximately 10 years. 

She leaves her son, Glenn Schalk of Grayslake. She Is 
preceded in death by her husband Allen G. Schalk; two 
brothers and daughter- In- law. 

Funeral Services were held Nov. 24 at Strang Funeral 
Chapel and Crematorium Ltd., Grayslake. 

Interment was private. 

In lieu of flowers donations may be given in Linnca's 
name to the Art Scholarship Fund, c/o the Grayslake 
Women's Club, 485 Kevin Ln., Grayslake, IL 60030. 

Charles Wittmer 

Age 73 of Ingleside, passed away Thursday, Nov. 23, 
2000 at Victory Lakes Continuing Care Center, Llndenhurst. 
He was bom Sept. 28, 1927 in Cuero, Tex., the son of the late 
Charles and Annie (Bohne) Wittmer. Charles served In the 
U.S. Army. 

Survivors include one son, Charles Wittmer of Canyon, 
Tex.. 

Funeral Services and interment was private. 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch handled the arrange- 
ments. 

Daniel 'Ralph* Andre 

Age 61 of Ncshkoro, Wis., formerly or the Antioch and 
Lake Villa areas passed away suddenly, Wednesday, Nov. 22, 
2000 at his home. He was born July 7, 1939. ln 1970, he and 
his brother opened the Red Arrow Inn in Antioch. Liter In 
1972, he opened Rcbuitders, Inc. in Lake Villa and soon after, 
his cousin, Kenny Petersen became his business partner. He 
also owned Raydan's in Antioch. He owned and operated 
Club 73 in Neshkoro, Wis. 

Survivors include his wife, Dolores; two sons, Danny 





(Brcnda) of Kenosha, Wis; and David of Fox Lake; one 
daughter, Donna (Steve) Eusticc of Neshkoro, Wis. 

A Memorial visitation will be held from 3 -5 p,m. 
Saturday, Dec. 2 at the Strang Funeral Home of Antioch, 
1055 Main St., Antioch. 

Funeral Services and interment were held earlier in 
Wautoma.Wis. 

In lieu of flowers, those desiring may make contribu- 
tions to Ducks Unlimited, PO Box 316, Antioch, IL, 60002 in 
his memory. 

Diane McGuan 

Age 61 , passed away Friday, Nov. 24. 2000 at the Nathan 
Adalson Hospice In Las Vegas, Nev. She was born Sept. 29. 
1939 in Spring Grove, the daughter of the late George 
'Shorty' and Agnes (Weber) May. She was a loving wife, 
mother and sister. She was a dance Instructor at the Arthur 
Murray dance studios In Waukegan and also sang ai many 
church weddings. She was employed at the Beverly Wllshire 
Hotel and the Beverly Hilts Hotel, 

.She Is survived by her son John McGuan (Mayda 
Tchakmakjian) her mother-in-law, Ani Tchakmajian, her 
step-daughters, Nora Palma and Lecann McGuan. 

Mass of Resurrection will be celebrated at 10:30 a.m. 
Saturday. Dec. 2 at St. Peter Church, 2118 Main St., Spring 
Grove with the Rev. Andrew Plesa officiating. 

Interment will be in (he parish cemetery. 

Those desiring may make contributions to the family in 
her memory. 

Robert K. 'Bud' Beaman 

Age 79 of Wildwood, formerly of Decatur, passed 
away on Nov. 27..2000 at Condell Medical Center, 
Libertyville. Robert was born on Feb. 10. 1921 in 
Palmer to Marion (Ruby) Beaman. Robert was a 
veteran of WWII serving in the U.S. Arrrfy retiring in 1983 
from Sort Sheridan where he was employed as Audio Visual 
Communications and former employee of the Decatur 
Signal Depot. 

Robert leaves his wife, Helen (nee Jenkins) to whom he 
wed on April 4, 1951 in Decatur; his children, Sammy-Ann 
(Ron) Robblns of LaPorle, Ind., Steven Gallion of Wildwood, 
Melinda Tomlinson of Wildwood, Joseph (Cheryl) Beaman 
of Grayslake. 

Funeral Services and interment were privately held. 
Funeral arrangements were entrusted to Strang Funeral 
Chapel and Crematorium Ltd., Grayslake. 

Memorials may be given to the American Lung 
Association, 3000 Kclley Une. Springfield. IL, 62707 in 
Robert's memory. 

Genevieve E. Bracher (nee Willis) 

Age 89 of San Marcos, Calif, formerly of Grayslake, 
passed away Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2000 in Escondido. Calif. 
She was bom in Thomson on July 10, 191 1, the daughter of 
Martin and Martha B. (Smith) Willis. Her husband Herbert 
Bracher, preceded her in death. 

She will be missed by a daughter, Dolores A. (Eddie) 
O'Clair of Escondido, Calif.; four sons. Richard A. (Nancy) 
Bracher of San Marcos. Calif.. James (Carol) Bracher of 
Ulandon. Penn., David Bracher of I jbertyville, Dale Bracher 
of Round Lake. 

Funeral Services will be at 10 a.m. Saturday. Dec. 2 at 
the Strang Funeral Chapel and Crematorium Ltd.. Grayslake 
with Rev. Greg Wiggins of Living Waters Assembly of God 
Church officiating. 

Visitation will be from 6-9 p.m.. Friday: Dec. 1 at the 
funeral home. 

Interment will be in Highland Memorial Park. 
Libertyville. 

Memorials may be made In Genevieve's name to 
Elizabeth Hospice, 121 N. Crest St., Escondido, Calif. 92025. 

Mike J. D'Amore 

Age 65 of Lake Villa passed away at Condell Medical 
Center in Libertyville on Nov. 27, 2000. He was born in 
Chicago on March 7, 1935. the son of Josephine and the late 
Mike S. D'Amore, 

He is survived by his wife, Berna; his children, Michael 
(Marianne) of Third Lake and Mellody (Dean) Kantner of 
Lake Villa; his mother, Josephine. 

Funeral Services were held Nov. 30 at Ringa Funeral 
Home. Lake Villa to Prince of Peace Catholic Church for a 
Funeral Mass. 

Helen M. Keisler 

Age 78 of Antioch, passed away Monday, Nov. 20, 2000 
at the Terrace Nursing Home, Waukegan, following a long ill- 
ness. She was born Nov. 8, 1922 in Waukegan, the daughter 
of the late Earl and Rose (Paosch) Horton. On March 1, 1941, 
she married Leo F. Keisler. 

Survivors Include her husband, a daughter, Janet 
(Stephen (Krumm) of Kenosha, Wis. and a son, Lance (Janet) 
Keisler of St. John, Virgin Islands: a sister, Eleanor Hauserof 
Antioch; a brother, Robert (Laura) Horton of Antioch and a 
step-brother, Lyle Horton of Kenosha, Wis. 

Funeral Services were held Nov. 25 at the Strang Funeral 
Home of Antioch with the Rev. Gary L Curl of the United 
Methodist Church ol'Anlioch officiating. 

Interment was at Hillside Cemetery, Antioch. 

Marie Sterbenz 

Age 82 of Bristol. Wis. formerly of Antioch, passed away 
Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2000 at the Aurora Medical Center, 
Kenosha,"Wls. after a sudden Illness. She was born Sept. 30, 
1918 in Nauhausen, Germany, the daughter of the late 
George and Marie (Salzer) Wurster. On May 26, 1947 she 
married Herman J. Sterbenz in Waukegan and he preceded 
her in death on Oct. 13, 1986. She and her late husband 
operated the Loon Lake Service Garage for many years. She 
later worked as a nurses aid for the Northern Illinois Medical 

Continued on next page 



BIO/ Lakeland Newspapers 



OBITUARIES/LEGAL NOTICES 



December I, 2000 



Continued from previous page 

Center In McHenry, until her retirement. 

Survivors include one son, Richard (Barbara) 
Wolf of Antioch; two daughters, Rosemary 'Mitzy' 
(Michael] Haviland of Antioch and Taml (Gerald) 
Bernstein of Charlotte, NC: one brother, William 
Wurster of Marble Falls, Tex. and one sister, Clara 
Stosior of Park City. 

Funeral Services were held Nov. 24 at the Faith 
Evangelical Lutheran Church, Antioch. 

Friends called at the church on Friday, Nov. 2<1 
until the time of services. 

Interment was. at Millbum Cemetery, Millburn. 

Those desiring to do so may make contribu- 
tions to the Faith Evangelical Lutheran Church 
Building Fund, In her memory. 

Arrangements were entrusted to the Strang 
Funeral Home of Antioch. 

Eugene N. Hoeune Jr. 

Age 76 of Gages Lake passed away Monday, 
Nov. 20, 2000 at his home. He was born Dec. 27, 
1923 in Evanston, the son of the late Eugene and 
Barbara (Wagner) Koeune. He was a US Marine 
serving widi the 5th Marine Division during WWII, 
was a survivor of Iwo lima. After the war, he operat- 
ed Koeune's Greenhouse in Morton Grove with his 
father and brothers, in 1972, he and his son, Eugene 
III moved the business to Antioch now called 
Koeune's Flower Farm and Gene retired in 1909. 

Survivors include his wife of 53 years, Dolores; 
his six children, Eugene HI (Janice) of Antioch, 
Kathryn (Erv) Sikorslci of Afton, Okla., Joan Vitcllo of 
Antioch, Mary Stevens of Napervillc, James of 
Manlstique, Mich, and Barbara (Robert) Johnson of 
High wood. 

. Funeral Services with Mass of Christian burial 
was held Nov. 25 at Si. Paul the Apostle Church, 
Gurnee. 

Friends called at Strang Funeral Home of 
Antioch. 

Interment was at Highland Memorial Park 
Cemetery, Libertyville. 

Those desiring may make contributions to Our 
Lady of the Angels Retirement Home, 1201 
Wyoming St., Jolicl, IL, 60435 or the Evansion 
Hospital Congestive Heart Failure Fund. 

James G. Bokan 

Age 36, a resident of Inglcsidc for the past 24 
years, formerly of Lindcnhurst died Monday, Nov. 
20, 2000 at the Highland Park Hospital following an 
auto pedestrian accident on the tollway. He was 
born on Aug. 17, 1964 in Limestone, Maine to James 
L and Barbara (nee Rexrolh) Bokan and was a self- 
employed carpenter. 

Survivors Include, one daughter, Cassie Bokan 
of Delavan, Wis.; his mother, Barbara Bokan of 
Ingleslde with whom he made his home; his father, 
James L Bokan of Oatman, Ariz.; two brothers, Ted 
and Don Bokan, both of Ingleslde and one sister, 
Kimbcrly (Jim) Sikorski ofTwin Lakes, Wis, 

Memorial Services were conducted on Nov. 25 
at the K. K. Hamshcr Funeral Home, Fox Like (The 
Chapel on the Lake) with the Rev. Collin Hughes 
officiating. 

Donations to the family for the Cassie College 
Fund will be appreciated in lieu of flowers. 

Robert Carlton 'Bob 7 Cass 

Age 60 of Shell Knob, Mo., formerly of 
Waukcgan passed away Saturday, Nov. 10, 
2000 in St. John's Regional Health Center, 
Springfield, Mo. He was born March 22, 
1940 in Tracy, Minn., the son of Charles 'Carl' and 
Olga Toft Cass. He was employed with Outboard 
Marine Corp. In Waukcgan for 32 years. He retired as 
foreman about five years ago. 

He was united in marriage to Darlene Bcrkholtz 
who survives. Also surviving are one son, Mike Cass 
and his wife, Michelc of Gages Lake; one daughter, 
Debbie DcVolt and Steve of Zion; his parents, Carl 




and Olga Cass of Grayslake. 

A memorial visitation was held Nov. 25 at the 
Strang Funeral Chapel and Crematorium Ltd., ■ 
Grayslake. 

Interment was privately held. 

Michael Bernard English 

Age 40 of Lake Villa passed away Nov. 20, 2000. 
He was born Oct, 25, 1952 in Chicago. He lived in 
Lake Villa from 1960 and went to Gavin Grade 
School and Grant High School. He received his BA 
and Masters Degrees from Western Illinois 
University and Ids Doctoral Studies in Physiology at 
Brigham Young University. He was a volleyball 
coach at the University of Columbia, Mo, He moved 
to Laramie, Wyo. On Nov. 3, 1907 he married Nancy 
Montgomery. 

He is survived by his wife, Nancy; parents, Peter 
and Jean English; a sister, Susan Newton; nephew, 
Douglas Newton, USM; a niece, Carey Newton, and 
a grand-niece, Juliette Newton. 

Memorial Services will be held at United 
Methodist Church of Inglcsidc, 36325 N. Church St., 
in Inglcsidc on Dec. 2 at 1 1 a.m. 

In lieu of flowers, donations may be given to the 
National MS Society, Michael English Memorial, 910 
W. Van Burcn, Chicago, IL60G07. 

Jane I. Mampe 

Age 05 passed away on Monday, Nov. 20, 2000 at 
Winchester House Libertyville. 

She leaves her son, Edwin (Carol) Mampe Jr. of 
Ingleslde. 

Funeral Services were held on Nov. 25 at Strang 
Funeral Chapel and Crematorium Ltd., Grayslake 
with the Rev. Rich Rubiclta officiating. • 

Interment was private. 

In lieu of flowers donations may be given to the 
donor's charity of choice. 

William Donald 'Don' Stewart 

Age 02, Gurnee, formerly of Kenosha, Wis. died 
at his sons residence in Kenosha, Wis. on Friday, 
Nov. 24, 2000. Born in Kenosha, Wis., Jan. 30, 1910, 
he was the son of the late Dr. William C. and Amelia 
A. (Bernard) Stewart. He attended public schools in 
Kenosha, Wis., graduating horn Kenosha High 
School. He also attended the University of 
Wisconsin, Madison and the Art Institute in 
Chicago, In 1942 he married Dorothy Provencher- 
Bilak in Kenosha, Wis. He later married Genevieve 
Gungleron April 21, 1972 in Millburn. Hewasaself- 
employed Interior designer at Interiors in 
Waukegan. 

He is survived by his wife, Genevieve orGurnec; 
one son, Bradley Stewart or Kenosha, Wis.; two 
daughters, Denise Creighlon and Lisa Stewart; both 
of Kenosha, Wis,; one brother, Winston Stewart of 
Milwaukee, Wis. and four grandchildren. 

Funeral Services for Don was held at Bruch 
Funeral Home, 3503 Roosevelt Hd., Kenosha, Wis, 
on Nov. 20, at 1 1 a.m. 

Visitation was Nov. 27, from 4-7 p.m. 

Interment was at Green Ridge Cemetery. 

Ronald 'Peter* Wagner 

Age 53 of Tucson, Ariz., formerly of Antioch, 
died Nov. 12, 2000 in Tucson, Ariz. He lived In 
Florida, North Carolina, Wisconsin, Montana and 
then Arizona. Barn Aug. 5, 1 947 in Illinois, the son of 
Thomas and Susan (Ciao) Wagner. Mr. Wagner 
attended Antioch Grade schools and Salem Central 
High School. He was a motorcycle rider and served 
in the US Army in the Viet Nam era. 

He is survived by his daughter, Chanel Wagner 
of Florida; a brother, Kenneth Wagner of Burlington, 
Wis.; one grandchild; nieces, nephews, other rela- 
tives and friends. He is preceded In death by his 
father, brothers, Donald and Thomas; and sister, 
Joyce Bryant. 

Memorial Services will be held Saturday, Dec. 2 
at noon at the Schucttc-Daniels Funeral Home, 625 



S, Browns Lake Dr., Burlington, Wis. with Rev. 
Anthony Clrlgnanl OFM. 

Friends may call on Saturday, Dec. 2 from 9 
a.m.- noon at the funeral home, 

Interment will be at Burlington Cemetery. 

Ann Emma Borchardt 

Age 06 of Antioch, passed away on Tuesday, 
Nov. 21, 2000 at Libertyville Manor after suffering a 
stroke. She was born in Chicago to the late Joseph 
and Anna (Wolshon) Klosson Feb. 9, 1914. She mar- 
ried Harold William Borchardt on Feb. 3, 1940. He 
preceded her in death on April 0, 1909. She lived In 
Antioch for the past 50 years; was a member of St. 
Peter's Parish and was a former employee of the 
State Bank of the Lakes In Antioch. 

Ann leaves many loving friends and family 
which include her sons, William (Patricia) Borchardt 
of Lake Villa, James (Lois) Borchardt of Bcltcndorf, 
Iowa; her daughters, Kristyn (Dennis) Murphy of 
Antioch and Joan Wysocki of Betlcndorf, Iowa. 
Additionally, she was the beloved grandmother of 13 
children and the great-grandmother of eight chil- 
dren. She will be greatly missed by her only surviv- 
ing sister and best friend, Lucille (Kcmcn) Lcntz of 
Burlington, Wis. She Is preceded in death by her 
brothers, Edward and Joseph Kloss; her sisters, 
Loretla Kloss and Margaret Reagan; one Infant son 
and one grandson. 

Memorial Services will be private for family 
only. 

Interment will be at All Saints Cemetery in Dcs 
Plaincs. 

Prayers are requested in lieu of flowers or dona- 
tions. 

Olga M. Jonas 

Age 07 of Lindcnhurst, passed away at home on 
Nov. 24, 2000. She was born May 29, 1913. the 
daughter of the late James and Stella Ktlll. 

She Is survived by daughters, Dolores (Hans) 
Kocrting, Mary Jonas and Virginia (John) Olesinksl. 

Funeral Services were held Nov. 20 at Ringa 
Funeral Home, Lake Villa. 

Interment was private. 

Peter Smessaert 

Age 92 of Baldwin, Ga. passed away 
Wednesday, Nov. 22. 2000 at lite Scenic View 
Nursing Home, Baldwin, Ga. He was horn June 20, 
1900 In Belgium the son of the late Alphonse and 
Icancttc (Demusurc) Smessaert. He was a member 
of Grace Calvary Church in Clarkcsville, Ga., 
Chicago Janitors Union, National Rifle Association, 
Amateur Trap Shooters Association, McHenry Gun 
Club, Professional Bike Riders Association, 
Belgium-American Club and the Foresters. As a 
sportsman he was a member of the Olympic com- 
mittee a torch bearer and bronze medalist in 1920. 
Hc.worked f or rnan y years as a stationary engineer 
retiring In 1973. On June 13, 1933 he married 
Angeline Mlnne. 

Survivors include his wife, Angeline; a son, 
Chuck (Sharon) Smessaert of Sautee, Ga. and a 
daughter, Charlene (Bob) Vogel oT Casper, Wyo.; five 
grandchildren and two great grandchildren. 

Funeral Services were held Nov. 30 at the Strang 
Funeral Home, Antioch with the Rev. Vincent 
Eckholm of St. Ignatius Episcopal Church officiating. 

Friends called at the funeral home from 1 1 
a.m., Nov. 30 until the lime of services. 

Interment was at Highland Memorial Park, 
Libertyville. 

Stephanie Jane Hobson 

Age 49 of Topsficld Mass., a Philanthropic 
Consultant, daughter of Virginia C. (Hcatherly) 
Hobson of Williamsburg, Va. and the late Stanley L 
Hobson, died Tuesday evening, Nov. 21, 2000 at 
home. Born in Frankfurt, Germany, she moved to 
•Mundelein where she was raised and educated. She 
has been u resident of the Boxford, Mass. and 



Topsfield, Mass. area since 1970. 

Stephanie was a member of the Mundelein 
High School graduating class of 1969, and later 
received her Bachelor Degrees from Illinois 
Weslcyan University, majoring In nursing and 
English literature. Stephanie was also a member of ' 
the Alpha Omicron PI Sorority. Upon completion 
of her education she rose to the position of assis- 
tant head nurse In the intensive care unit of RUSH 
Presbyterian St. Luke's Hospital In Chicago. She 
was engaged as a Philanthropic Consultant (or 
The Horizon Foundation and The Essex County 
Community Foundation. 

An active parent at Shore County Day School 
in Beverly, Mass., she served on the board of 
trustees for over 10 years, and played a major role 
In the development of The Brian It. Walsh Library 
and Science Center. Stephanie was also a board 
member of "A Better Chance-Masconomef an 
educational organization for Inner city youth. 

Surviving Stephanie in addition to her mother 
arc one daughter, Rebecca Gutncr and two sons, 
Michael and Samuel Gutncr all of Topsficld, Mass. 
Other surviving -members include, one sister, 
Laurie Eckcrt of Milwaukee. Wis.; three brothers, 
Jeffrey Hobson of St. Thomas USVI, Christopher 
Hobson of Madbury, NH and Mark Hobson of 
Libertyville, as well as several nieces and nephews. 

Her funeral service was held in The Trinity 
Episcopal Church. River St., Topsficld, Moss". 
Sunday, Nov. 26 at 2 p.m. 

Assisting the family with the arrangements 
was the Pctcrson-O'Donncll Funeral Home, 
Danvers, Mass. 

Expressions of sympathy may be made In her 
honor to the North Shore Cancer Center, 17 
Centennial Dr., Pcabody, Mass., 01960 or the Essex 
County Community Foundation, 49 Salem ltd., 
Topsficld, Mass., 01903. 

Wade Johnson 

Age 73 of Round Lake Beach, died 
Saturday, Nov. 25. 2000 at Condcll 
Medical Center in Libertyville. He was 
born Oct. 31, 1927 in Sardls, Miss, and 
moved to Chicago in 1950. He was a resident of the 
Round Lake Beacli area since 1975. A veteran of the 
US Army, he served during the Korean War. He was 
a machinist with Federal Tool and Plastic Co. in 
Chicago for over 30 years. After retiring from 
Federal Tool, he was a maintenance engineer for 
the K-Mart store In Round Lake Beach. 

He attended Lakeland Baptist Church of take 
Villa. Mr. Johnson was also a retired Southern 
Baptist minister, having preached in many, 
Chicago area and Lake County churches. He stud- 
ied the Bible avidly. 

He is survived by his children, Irene McDaniel 
of Odd, W.Va,, Edith (Danny) Margraves or 
Winchester, Va., Zclma Price of Round l.akc Beach, 
Rita (Lcman) Pendlcy of take Villa,. I.lndii 
(Leonard) Pendlcy of Round take Beach. Connie 
(Lcnard) Phillips of Fannington. Ky.. Anna (Randy) 
Blackburn of Round take Beach, Cheryl (Victor) 
Vince-Cruz of Round Lake, Lisa Payton of 
Waukegan, Timothy (Rose) Johnson of Paddock 
Lake, Wis.; 40 grandchildren. 42 great-grandchil- 
dren, four great-great grandchildren; three broth- 
ers, Clyde (Geneva) Johnson of Memphis, Tenn.. 
Woodrow (Mary) Johnson of Strawberry, Ark., 
LcRoy (Bobbie) Johnson of Strawberry, Ark.; iwo 
sisters, Willie Jackson of Como, Miss., Bculah 
Bradley of Mammoth Springs, Ark. He is preceded 
In death by his parents; his wife, Utile, on March 
29, 1 909; n daughter, Dreama Carol In infancy; a 
son, Fred, in 1904; and a grandson, James Walton 
in 1965. 

Visitation was from 4-0 p.m. Nov. 27 at Justen's 
Round take Funeral Home, Round take. 

The funeral service was held at 1 1 a.m. Nov. 20 
at Lakeland Baptist Church, take Villa. Visitation 
was from 10 a.m. until the time of the service. 

Interment was at Memory Gardens, Arlington 
Heights. 




PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Pro-Heallh 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Stalling agency 
for health care facility & services lor 
home healthcare 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1429 
Vineyard Dr., Gurnee, IL 60031. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Elizabeth G. Kabuhal, 1429 Vineyard 
Dr., Gurnee, IL 60031. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intendfs) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ Elizabeth G. Kabuhat 
November 14, 2000 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by Ihe per- 
sons) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 14th day of November, 2000. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/ Eleanor A. Petruska 
Notary Public 
Received: Nov. 14, 2000 
Willard R. Holander 
Lake County Clerk 
1100D-3732-GP 
November 24, 2000 
December 1,2000 
December 8, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: CM Travel 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Travel Agency 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1384 
Falrport Dr., Grayslake, IL 60030, 
(847) 548-6100. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Christine McMullen, 1384 Fairport Dr., 
Grayslake, IL 60030, (847) 548-8727. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the under- 
signed intend{s) to conduct Ihe above 
named business from Ihe lccatlon(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) ol (he person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ Christine McMullen 
November 4, 2000 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before mo by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 4th day of November, 2000, 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
tsJ Lynette A. Strauss 
Notary Public 
Received: Nov. Q, 2000 
Willard R. Holander 
Lake County Clerk 
1100C-3726-GL 
November 17, 2000 
November 24, 2000 
December 1,2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Awesome 

Nails 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 143 Conter 
St.. Grayslake. IL 60030. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Mary H. Metscaviz, 316 York, 
Grayslake, IL 60030. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the localion(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of ihe person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting Ihe business 
Is/aro correct as shown, 
/s/ Mary H. Metscaviz 
November 6, 2000 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by (he per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct Ihe busi- 
ness this 1 4th day of August, 2000. 



OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/ Karen A. Korloy 

Notary Public 

Received: Nov. 14, 2000 

Willard R. Holander 

Lake County Clerk 

1100D-3731-GL 

November 24, 2000 

December t, 2000 

December 8, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: RomaNautica 
NATURBPURPOSE: Manufacture 
and Retail Sato of Arts and Crafts 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 20538 
Clarice Ave, Prairio View, IL 60069, 
(847)541-6003. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Boverly J, Savinski, 20538 Clarice 
Ave, Prairie View, IL 60069, (847) 541- 
6003. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the under- 
signed Intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
indicated and thai the true or real full 
name(s) of tho person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting tho business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
fsJ Boverly J. Savinski 
November 2, 2000 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) Intending lo conduct the busi- 
ness ihis 3rd day ol November, 2000. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
isl Eloanor A. Polruska, Nolary Public 
Received: Nov. 3, 2000 
Willard R. Helander 
take County Clerk 
1100C-3721-LB 
November 17, 2000 
November 24, 2000 
December 1 , 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Creative 

Painting by Cheryl 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Faux Ftnishos, 
Stenciling, Handpafnflng on walls 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 39 
Woodland Clue, Fox Lake, IL 60020, 
(847) 587-B747. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Cheryl Becker, 39 Woodland Ave, Fox 
Lake, IL 60020, (847) 587-8747. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to cerlily lhat tho undersigned 
Intond(s) (o conduct the above named 
business from Ihe location(s) indicat- 
ed and lhat the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ Cheryl Bockor 
November 1 1 , 2000 

Tho foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before mo by the per- 
son(s) inlonding to conduct the busi- 
ness this 13th day of Novomber , 
2000. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/ Betty Smith. Notary Public 

Received: Nov. 16, 2000 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1200A-3744-FL 

December 1 , 2000 

December 8, 2000 

December 15, 2000 



-• ■ i ■ * -, ■ 



December 1, 2000 LEGAL NOTICES Lakeland Newspapers/ B 1 1 



an 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Breezy Point 

Properties 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Rental Property 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 11 North 
Skoklo Hwy, Lake Bluff, IL 60044, 
(847)615-1200. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Karl R. Smutney, 165 Coolldge, 
Ubertyvllle, IL 60046 

(680-0323). Jell Bell, 177 Hollow Way, 
Inglesido, IL 60041 (973-9177). 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the under- 
signed iniond(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
Indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown, 
1st Karl R. Smutney 
November 9, 2000 
isl Jeff Bell 
November 9, 2000 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 9th day of November, 2000. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/ Lynn Fred Swichtenberg 
Notary Public 
Received: Nov. 9, 2000 
Wiilard R. Helandor 
Lake County Clerk 
110OC-3714-LB 
November 17, 2000 
November 24, 2000 
December 1,2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Four Winds 

Soapworks 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Soap Making 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1021 
Barberry Lane, Round Lake Beach, IL 
60073,(847)201-1071. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Annette Luethy, 1021 Barberry Lane, 
Round Lake Beach, IL 60073, (847) 
201-1071. Ronald C. Luothy Jr., 1021 
Barberry Lane. Round Lake Beach, IL 
60073,(847)201-1071. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) indicat- 
ed and that the true or roal full 
name(s) of Ihe porson(s) owning, con- 
ducting or 'transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
isl Annette Luothy 
November 17, 2000 
Isl Ronald C. Luothy 
November 17. 2000 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged beloro mo by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 17th day of December, 2000. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
is/ Martha Jane Gedvilas 
Notary Public 
Received: Nov. 17, 2000 
Wiilard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
1200A-3746-RL 
December 1,2000 
December 8, 2000 
December 15, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: BML Financial 

Resource Group 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Financial 

Consulting 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 4503 W. 
Forest Ave, Waukogan, IL 60085, 
(847) 263-9850. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Brian Levitan, 4503 W. Forest Ave, 
Waukegan, IL 60085, (847) 360-1 1 64. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that Ihe under- 
signed Intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the locallon(s) 
indicated and that the truo or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting Ihe business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
Is/ Brian Levitan 
October 2, 2000 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per* 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 3rd day of November, 2000. 



Truth .In Lending 



OFFICIAL SEAL 

Isl Jordan A. Ganan 

Notary Public 

Received: Nov. 3, 2000 

Wiilard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1100C-3708-GP 

November 17, 2000 

November 24, 2000 

December 1. 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Holly's 

Delivery 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Delivery 

Working for Florists 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 13B9 
Almaden L/i, Gurnee, IL 60031, (847) 
338-0601. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Adell H. Koger, 1389 Almaden Ln., 
Gurneo, IL 60031, 

(338-0601). Bruce C. Kogor, 1389 
Almaden Ln., Gurnee, IL 60031. 
(338-0601). 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the under- 
signed Intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location (s) 
indicated and that the truo or real full 
name(s) o( the person's) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting Ihe business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Adell H. Koger 
November 8, 2000 
Isl Bruce C. Kogor 
November 8. 2000 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 6th day of November, 2000. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
Isl Brian Moy 
Notary Public 
Received: Nov. 9, 2000 
Wiilard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
1 100C-3723-GP 
November 17, 2000 
November 24, 2000 
December 1,2000 



PUBUC NOTICE 
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH 
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
In the Matter of the Estate of ) 

PAULINE FRANCES CHERF, ) No. OOP 1031 

Deceased ) 

CLAIM N OTI CE 
Notice Is given ol Ihe death of PAULINE FRANCES CHERF, ol Lake Zurich. Illinois. 
Letters of office wore Issued on November 20, 2000, to JAMES McGRATH, 216 
Linden Road, Lake Zurich, Illinois, whose attorney Is ALBERT S. SALVI, SALVI, 
SALVI & WIFLER, P.C., 335 Chancery Lane, Lake Zurich, Illinois 60047. 

Claims against the estate may bo filed In the office ol the Clerk of Ihe Circuit Court 
at 18 N. County Street. Waukogan. Illinois 60085 Room C-307 or with representative, 
or both, on or before June 1 , 2001 which date Is not less than 6 months from the date 
ol Ihe first publication ol this notice and any claim not filed within that period is barred. 
Copies of this claim filed with the Clerk must be mailed or delivered to the represen- 
tative and lo the attorney within 10 days after it Is filed. 

Isl Albert S. Salvi 

ALBERT S. SALVI, Attorney 

1100D-3738-WL 

Novomber 24, 2000 

December 1,2000 

December 8. 2000 



Lakeland Newspapers is interested to hear news 

of local Events, Clubs, and Organizations. 

Please send news Items to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St., Gray slake, 6O03O 

Tel. 223-8161 Fax 223-8810 

PHOTOS ARE ALSO WELCOME 



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• FHA. VAand Conventional Frvanohg 

• Fresh Rate. Nenemah and 40 Year Mortgages 

Take The Easy V\tey Homo 

Call or visit us at: 

www.marheistreelmongage.com/schaumburg 



NORTHSIDE COMMUNITY BANK 



Since: 1997. AS 125 ml LSllOmd 847-244-5100 

30/lix 7.625 7.716 0V0 S300 5% 

30/lix/jumbo 8.125 8.218 0/0 $300 5% 

3/1/amVjumbo 7.625 8.529 070 S300 10% 

Interest Only payments available on Jumbo Aims 

Coii Dave Patterson at 847-244-5tooi 

www.nscombank.com 



PNC MORTGAGE 



S«o!952;A$77M.L$63b3 847-549-4040 

30/W|umbo 8250 8.250 0/0 SO 5% 
hiercaOrt/Syr 7.875 8500 0/0 $400 20% 
mwegOVyr 8.000 8500 0/0 $400 20% 
3Q/1ix/FHA 7.875 8.140 070 $0 3% 
10% Down Payment -NO EMI 
Call Eric (847) 549-2502 



PLATINUM HOME MORTGAGE 



Snce 1993; U$j«U 800-9LENDER 

affiliate of Platinum Community Bank 
Wo malch borrowers lo the loans they need. 

• 100% financing 

• No PMI for high loan ratios 

• Hassle Iree loans lor self-employed 

• No restrictions tor first-time buyers 



STATE FINANCIAL BANK, N.A 



847-360-3304 

0/0 $300 5% 

0/0 $300 5% 

0/0 S300 10% 

070 $350 3% 



This week. The Meyers Report digs into the mailbag 
once again to answer readers' questions and in the sea- 
son for big consumer spending, credit is a hot issue. 

Q. I'm getting ready to shop Tor my first mort- 
gage. What can I do to make my credit look better? 

A. "You probably needed to ask that question two or 
three years ago," said.Angelo Cusinato. president of" 
Resource Plus Mortgage, a midwestem mortgage company. 

"One of the- most frequent questions we get asked is 
about credit, and I can't emphasize strongly enough that 
it's one of the biggest things a lender looks at. The prob- 
lem is, you can't just fix it by getting your payments up 
to date (at the last minute.) If you have missed pay- 
ments, if collection agencies have contacted you, that's 
going to make it more difficult for you to get the rate 
you want, or even lo get your mortgage." 



"Unfortunately." he added, "most people don't think 
about their credit until they're ready to look for a mort- 
gage. If you think that you may be looking for a mon- j 
gage, even three or four years down the road, check on 
your credit now. You may find mistakes, which can take 
several months to get corrected, or worse, you may find 
that you have problems that are your fault. In that case, 
all you can do is start making regular payments, on 
schedule and on time, and give your credit time to 
heal." Otherwise, your only mortgage option may 
include a much higher interest rate than the rest of the 
"A" credit market. 

Q. I earn my income as a freelancer, so I have no 
steady employment. I have several steady clients, 
however, and I've kept up rent payments. Will my 
lack of an employer make it hard for me to get a 
mortgage? 

A. "If you're self-employed, you effectively have a 
business providing a service. You may have 20 cus- 
tomers, and they're different customers each year. As j 
long as a lender can sec that you are able to generate a 
stream of income doing what you do. that should not be 
an issue. That would not affect, by itself, your ability to 
have a loan." 

"In order for you to get the kind of loan you would 
want," he said, "that is, the rate that is quoted in most 
of the newspapers, you've got to be able to document 
income, have good credit, and have a down payment, 
usually five percent. So, if you're unable to document 
income, you may still be able to get a loan, but you 
may need a larger down payment, and good credit 
would be critical." 

Gary S. Meyers is President and CEO ol Meyers 
Communications Group Inc. and Founder ol The Meyers 
Report. He is a Nationally Syndicated Columnist and 
Economist. Mr. Meyers can be reached at 
gmeyers ©meyersnetwork.com. 



Equity futures 
beginning to 
post modest 
gain on news of 
+2.4% GDP. 
NASDAQ contin- 
ues to tremble. 

Remember, The 
Lowest Rate 
May Not Be The 
Best Deal. 

Consult a . 
Premier Lender 
To Explore All 
Ot Your Loan 
Options. 



7.77% f\ \ • '» 




A Premier Lender must: 

(1) be a chartered bank, savings association or credit union, or 

(2) have been h business tor Irvo years and have successfully 
dosed 5,000 loans 

(3) not have hidden or excessive lees. 

Living in Greater Chicago Magazine 

SVW1 rtixnt tanls • Hwir value* • 

TuirtiwUer wliiie at www.Grc«t*rClilci|(W«n tw cull W7-I05-9J2J 

MtttrfConi alvl Viu Aixcptcd 



Srnce18S2,A$tM.L$1t0mJ. 
30/Tix 7.500 7.625 

15/Tix 7.250 7.375 

30/Mumbo 8.000 8.125 
30/hx/FHA 7.500 7.750 

Offices in Illinois and Wisconsin 
www.lnterest.corn/bni/ 

Note: Rates as ol 1 1/28/00 and subject to change without notice. Rates based on a $100,000 mortgage with 20% down, with 
rale locks ol 45-60 days. Smaller down payments may require private mortgage insurance, which will raise APR. 



i^HBI - "-■; 



B12 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLAi 



December 1, 2000 



MEDIA 



HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD 

By Phone Call: 847.223.8161 
By Fax 847.223.2691 
By Mail: Lakeland Newspapers 
P.O. Box 268 
Grayslake, IL 60030 
In Person: 30 S. Whitney St., 
Grayslake 

DEADLINES 

Direct line .Mon. 5pm 

Classified (Business & Private Party).Wed.lOom 

HOURS 

8nm-ftpm .mi TVfnn.-Fri. 



gtifi 



You m»y cancel y°«<" •*• before 1 1 un- on Frld»y for the 
tallowing weeV» publication. 
He«*»Cbec*YourjLl 

In the event or an error. I .akclanil Newspapers Hill be 
responsible far only the rtrst lororrect Inwrtlun and onrjr 
Die portloD of the ail that la In error or rendered useless. 
Please contact the CUmITJcU Department Immediately In 
s of error. 



Announcements 



Recreational 



i ....... ti. . . 

> . • » * i » t » . ■ • • 





NEWSPAPERS 




8 4 7.223 



^o; 



w *< 



X-J-: 



kM 



Ad appears in 11 Lakeland Newspapers! 



Antioch News • Round Lake News 
Lake Villa Record • Mundelein News 
Wadsworth News • Grayslake Times 

Fox Lake Press • Gurriee Press 

LindenhurstNews • Wauconda Leader 

Libertyville News 



no 



Notices 




ATTENTION 
CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you hove placed classified 
advertising wllh the Lakeland 
Newspapers you may receive a 
misleading statement from 
another firm requesting pay- 
ment for ihls advertising. To 
receive proper credit to your 
account, all payments for your 
Lakeland Newspapers advertis- 
ing must bo mode as Invoiced 
and directed to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

PO Box 268 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake, IL 60030-0268 



110 



NbtKCS 



ATTENTIONtll 

Weighl Loss without hunger. 

www.diet4u.ne1 

code 10406 
(847) 604-0737. 



PARENTS 

WITHOUT PARTNERS 

LAKE COUNTY 

CHAPTER #247 

Is sponsoring Its 

2nd Annual 

Holiday Danco 

Saturday. 

Docombor 2, 2000, 

at (he Moose Lodge 

in McHenry 

7:30pm. -midnight. 

This is an open event to 

anyone who is single, 

separated, divorced or 

widowed. Married 

couples are also invited. 

Thero will be a 50/50 

rattle, cash bar, and 

music by Deena. 

Dressy attire is required. 

For more information, 

please call either 

Pam at (847) 838-4858 

Brian (815) 363-8119, 



J 



FOOD GIFTS 
FOR THE HOLIDAYS. 
Say happy holidays with 
gourmet food gifts from 
Tastefully Simple by hosting 
a fun filled in-home food par- 
ty. Not only are Tastefully 
Simply partys year-round, 
but they are a greal way to 
got 
together for the holiday 
season. Sample great 
tasting, easy to prepare 
foods like dips, salsa, 
breads, 
marinades; deserts, soups 
and spices. All these items 
delight the taste buds and 
make greal holiday gifts. Gifl 
packs are available. Most 
purchases can be taken 
home directly from the parly. 

Tastefully Simple offers 
seasonal items along with a 
year round product line. To 
book a gourmet lood party for 
the holiday season 
or any time call Barb 
(847) 973-2547. 
Ask about great opportuni- 
ties in becoming a Tastefully 
Simple consultant and earn 
great extra money. 



WAKE UP 

With 

MAKE UP! 

MICRO TATTOOINg of 

'EYEBROWS 

•EYELINE 

•UPLINE. 

ALSO OFFERING 

ELECTROLYSIS. 

(Permanent Hair Removal) 

FREE Brochures. 

(B47) 249-7446. 



125 


Personals 




3 V 




C.E.O. 

Egg Donors Needed 

• Give the gift or life to an infertile couple 

• Our program is completely anonymous 
24 hour/7 day support 

• Professionally staffed 



$5,000 Compensation 

Call Nancy and Slacey 

847-656-8733 Pager: 847-547-9788 

Tlie Center for Ugg Options Illinois, Inc. 



Looking to... 

Buy? Sell? 
Work? 

Find it here in LAKELAND 
NEWSPAPERS Classified Section. 

Call To Place Your Ad Today!! 
(847) 223-8161 



110 


Notices 



120 



Free 



SICK? 

GET HEALTHYI 

Boost your immunity by 

248% 5 times greater than 

anything on Iho market! 

800-460-9813 

Toll freo Drs. call 

847-557-2519 

Recorded voice mail. 

www.4tf.com/healthy 

Pel's sick? 

800-460-9811 

Toll free Vet call. 



SOUTH SCHOOL 

PTO FUNDRAISER 

Papa John's Pizza Card. 

Buy any largo or extra large 

pizza and got a forgo pizza 

with equal or lower loppings 

free. Purchase Iho card for 

only S10. Unlimited use until 

May 2001. Carry out 

or delivery. 

Call (847) 473-3051. 

(847) 785-0495 or 

(847) 689-8679, 



SUBMIT YOUR LAKELAND 
CLASSIFIED ADS ON THE 
INTERNET! 
Visit http://www.lpnews.com/ 
to place your ads conven- 
iently. Ads appear on the In- 
ternet, in all Lakeland Pa- 
pers... The Greal Lakes Bul- 
letin and The Market Journal 
for only S20.50 for 4 linos 
(approximately 16 words), 
then .60c each additional 
lino. 



ATTENTION 

PET OWNERS 

WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 

ACCEPT ADS FOR 
ANIMALS IN OUR FREE/ 

GIVE AWAY COLUMN. 
If you must give up your 
pet, please consider these 
facts. 

•Free , animal ads suggest 
that there is something 
wrong with the animal, or 
thai it has no value. 
•Some people who re- 
spond to these free animal 
ads are not reputable and 
are more concerned about 
making a profit than the 
animal. 

'Charging a fee to o poten- 
tial pot ownor confirms the 
responsibility of pel owner- 
ship for an entire lifetime 
ol that pel. For more infor- 
mation, please contact the 
Humane Society. 



125 


Personals 



$5000 TO WOMEN 

who are healthy to be anony- 
mous egg donors. Chicago's 
drsl and most highly respected 
program is looking lor women 
between iho ages 21-31. 
Donors will bo evaluated, tako 
modicaiion and undergo a minor 
surgical procedure. 

Serious inquiries only. 
Call ARR 773-327-7316 



115 



last & Found 



DID YOU FIND Someonos 
PET or Special Lost Arttclo? 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classifieds Dept., and got your 
results, FOUND ads ore 
RUN FREE of Charge. Call 
(847)223-8t61. 



120 


I'rce 



As a Patriotic Amorican, 
You'll enjoy social niu! 
service contacts made 
with the Natfy League 
Lake County Council 
membership, linjoy mi- 
base Circa I Lakes Naval 
Training Center access 
and Sea Power magazine. 
Itrocluire and Informa- 
tion are available by writ- 
ten request from: 
Fergal Gallagher, 2404 Stal- 
lion Ci., Grayslake, IL 60030 
or call 
(647) 543-1285 



ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad in the 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways are run at NO 
CHARGE! (Wo discourage 
any pel ads). Deadlines: 10am 
Wednesdays. (847) 

223-8161,0x1.140. 



To Place An 

' Ad With 
Lakeland 

Newspapers 
*CaU (847) 223-8161 
or Fax (847) 223-269 1 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



CHILDLESS COUPLE 
WANTS TO ADOPTI 

Dear Birthrnolher, 

You're searching for on 

answer, We're searching for 

a baby to love. We can help 

you through this difficult 

lime. We promise to raise 

your baby with a sense of 

pride & 

understanding. Above all, 

they will know you loved 

thorn very much. Please 

meet with usll Medical, legal 

counseling & court approved 

living expenses pd. 

Confidential. Please call our 

altorney (708) 922-4798. 




| BOBCAT OWNERS OPERATORS 

Top Pay! 

Plenty of work, Guaranteed hours. 
No wait for your money. Paid gas. 

(847) *7M747. 



. % 1 4 t 



' » ■ « . » 1 . \ ' f 1 I- 



125 



Personals 



EARN MONEY WITH AVON 

Get 40% off your 

Chrislmas shopping 

(630) 542-3312 Judy. 

HYPNOTHERAPY 

Quit Smoking 

Weight Loss 

Stress & Pain 

Remove Foars 

Past Life Regressions 

Healing & More. 

Eorappl. (847)821-7663. 



135 


Business 
Personals 


1 LOST 40 lbs. in 2 months. 
Natural, Doctor recommend- 
ed. Call for free sample: 1- 
866-266-3438. 


140 


Financial 



BE DEBT FREE. Yoars 
Sooner! Low Paymontsl Re- 
duced Interest! Slop late 
fees! Stop Collectors! FAMI- 
LY CREDIT COUNSELING. 
Non-Profil Christian, Agency., 
FEE QUOTE www.familycred- 
il.org RECORDED MES- 
SAGE 1-800-729-7964. 



219 



Help Warned 
Part-Unit" 



100 WORKERS NEEDED 

Assemble crafts, wood items 

Materials provided. 

To $480 f wk. 

Free information pkg. 24 Hr. 

(801)204-5597 



Administrative 

A,wl9tanl 

Growing Lake Forest urology 
practice looking lor a part limo 
administrative assistant. . Will 
(rain appropriate candidate. 
Benefits available. Ploase call 
847-2950010 or fax resume to 
847-295-5433. 



SCHOOL 

BUS DRIVERS 
AM and/or P.M Routes 



■S11.85/hr start 

• Paid training 

• Hospitalization avail 

• Houso moms & early 
retirees welcome 

• Starting pay adjusted 
for oxp'd drivers 



3 



HARRINGTON 

TRANSPORTATION 

COMPANY 

(847)381-1043 
(847)381-1552 



Receptionist 

Permanent !>/'!' 3 days 
w/iihcrmitiiiK Saturdays, 
24 l>rs/wk. J-'ast paced 
patient care office is 
looking for a mature in- 
dividual. Typing and 
data entry skills needed. 
Musi 1)0 good w/pcople 
and on i he telephone, 
Cnll Peter at 
1-800-445-4503 
Venumtlllls I Hawthorn 
Cvnter location. 



' 


B 


1 


"r 1 


till 


■ 




llvl." " 

III ''"J . 

'klj 








December 1, 2000 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B13 



i 



ON 



n 



nths. 
end- 
3: •!• 



1 



'oars 
Re- 
late 

AMI- 
.ING. 



V'-ll 



cred- 
vIES- 



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ED 

ems 

tHr. 



Ology 
time 
Will 

dalo. 

• call 

ne (o 



1 



mil 
arty 

stod 



N 
ION 

143 
.52 



219 



I Id n Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 



Help Warned 
Part-Time 



BILLING/ 

COLLECTIONS 

Part-Time 

Lakeland Media has an 
immediate position in 
our fast-paced Account - 
id|! Dcpt. Tor a nilllng / 
Collection Clerk person. 
Von must be an energetic 
individual who is (cam 
focused, accurate, and 
enjoys '.working with 
numbers. Knowledge of 
computer data entry 
helpful, but wc will train 
the right person. 
Stop by and Jill out an 
application or call Jo 
Davis for more Informa- 
tion. 
(047)223-8101. 
Or fax resume to: 
(847) 223-2G91 

LAKELAND 
MEDIA 

.10 S. Whitney Street 

Cray si like, II. (50030 
EOE 



Entry Level 

EDITORIAL 

REPORTERS 

Lakeland Newspapers is 
looking for people with a 
passion and a knack for 
journalism. This part- 
time writing position will 
give the right candidates 
a chance to get his or her 
Foot In the door as a local 
community journalist, 
covering the full gamut 
of stories that happen 
weekly in one of our Lake 
County communities. 
Please send /FAX-rosume 
with cover letter to: 

Lakeland 
Newspapers 

Attn: Dob Schroedcr 
30 S. Whitney Street 
Grayslake, IL 60030 
FAX: 847-223-8810 



CAFETERIA HELP 
Froomont Elom.School 

Food server, P/T, flexible 

schedule for Mom's with 

School Children,$7,00* 

$7.50 per hour. 

Call Debbie: 

847-837-0437 

ext. 2273 



HOMEWORKERS 
NEEDED 

$635 weekly processing 

mail. Easy! 

No experience needed. 

Call 1 .000652-8726 

Ext 2020 24 Mrs. 



SNOW REMOVAL 

EQUIPMENT OPERATORS 

S 13-22 per hour 

TRUCK DRIVER 

CDL and NON-CDL 

S 13-22 per hour 

SHOVELERS 

$10-12 per hour 

JAMES MICHAEUINC. 

25650 N. Gilmer Rd. 

Mundelein 

(847)438-8144 



HOUSEKEEPING 
FULL AND PART- 
TIME. Apply in person. 
Fairfield Inn 
6090 Gurnoe Mills 
Circle East. 



WORK rROdl H0II1E 

PART-TIME 

Phone solicitinq for 

pickups of clothing 

and household items. 

Well known organization. 

Please call 

630-515-5752 



ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/ 
PROGRAM SUPPORT 

Full/Time position available immediately to provide admin- 
istrative support services to Program Director. Write quarter- 
ly news letter, host training classes and assist other depart- 
ments with clerical duties. Must have excellent organiza- 
tional skills, ability to mull! task and work well with the public. 
Some nights and Saturdays required. Must be dependable, 
please send resume to: 

YWCA 

2133 BELVIDERE RD, 

WAUKEGAN, ILLINOIS 60085 

OR FAX: 847-662-4752 




it 

Jays 

lays, 

iced 
! is 
• fo- 
und 
tied, 
iiplc 



3 

writ 



I • 



So, you want to be a Millionaire? (Part One) 
By Scott T. Flclschmann 

II seems thai c*rry*Iicre you turn these days wc hear about Incredible 
vdorii-s and ilonR wiih the people »ho earn them. Even some of the (de- 
rision game show* we waich Infer thai wc are worth a million dollars. In 
fit t. we hear so much about money that wc ran sometimes gel a distort- 
id view of our own value In the mirket place. It Is natural for each of us 
to want to earn as much as possible, and to be compensated fairly for our 
ifltirts. However, it Is difficult In know you're exact worth In die market 
place, and there Is a irade-otf for earning top compensation. 

First, lets tide a look at how you can establish your financial value In 
die fob market. Earlier tins year t did a series of articles on this Ionic In 
this column. If you need a reprint of those anldes you can Ret diem from 
your local newspaper. In ihusc articles I stressed that It Is Important to 
evaluate benefits as welt as salary or wages. 

Intangible lieneflu are also Important. If you live In a major metropoli- 
tan arm, there Is a Significant saving if you have a job dial Is ten minutes 
in mi your home as opposed to a job downtown where you need in spend 
two hours in traffic and dien sfiend ten dollars on parking every day. The 
gas, oil changes, increased Insurance costs and depreciation of your car 
Li all cosily, not to men lion the loss of productive Urno. 

Expensive clothing can also he an additional cost. Working In a |ob 
where you need lo wear professional clothing Is more cosdy than a job 
where you can dress casually. 

For many people chihicarc is also a major concern. It can be very cost- 
ly Working for a company that has a cost reduced day care center 
decreases thai cost. There are some companies that allow people to 
lelecommutc, or work from home, coining lo the office only for Impor- 
tant meetings. This, of course, elimlnaics almost all of the childcare and 
clothing issues for some people. However, these companies are rare. 

More companies are experimenting with telecommudng every day 
because they can't find needed <|uallfled employees. HowTvcr, few have 
lieen able to manage tdecommuung successfully. There Is a slight 
increase in companies offering this option every year. Out, in the humble 
opinion of this writer, this option will disappear from corporate America 
die next time wc have a down turn In the job market. 

Only by cvaluadng salary/wages, benefits and cost reductions will you be 

fable to evaluate the real value of a Job. All three can be quantified through 

research. Insurance benefits can be evaluated by calling your Insurance 

igenl. A value can be associated lo lime olf by calculaUng the cost of a 

ty's work and multiplying it by the number of holidays and vacation days. 
:very benefit has a value. 

Next week I will slart an In depth look at look al the balance between 

nmpensaiion and die tradeoffs associated with higher compensation. 

con T. Fklsclinunii b a Principal with Integrity Business Solutions 
, a management consulting firm. He b responsible for the general 
anagement, human resources, Information technology and sales 

^suiting practices. He can be reached at (817) M34}2fl or through 
e-mail at tbs jcoitf8iuno.com. 






219 



Help Wanled. 
Part-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



IMMEDIATE 
OPPORTUNITIES 

•Part-time Tellers' 

•Boo keeper Trainees* 

Apply In Person at any 

Anchor Bank 

localion. 



MAILROOM 

CLERK 

Part Tlmo 

Mailroom at Medical 
School seeks a HS grad 
for Part-time posilion 
(M-F, Bam-NOONJ.A 
valid Illinois Driver's 
License is necessary. 
Previous mailroom exp. 
desirable a s weil.as 
computer exp. Individ- 
ual must also bo 
physically capable of 
occasional heavy lifting. 
Please stop by & complete 
application MF, 8am-4pm. 
Or mail/lax resume to: 
Personnel Dlr., 
FUHS/Chlcago 
Medical School, 

3333 Green Bay Fid., 

North Chicago, IL 60084. 
FAX:(M7)578-327i 

EOE 



SCHOOL BUS 

DRIVER 
S13.39-S17.92 

per hour!! 

•Friendly work 

environment 

•Excellent benefits 

package 

. 'Guaranteed 5hrs./day 

••2001 'Bluebird* 

Transit style buses 

•COL license or ILbus 

permit preferred. 

Stop In and till out an 
application today! 

Personnel Department 

Warren Township 

High School 

500 N. O'Plalno Rd. Gur- 
noo, II. 60031 
(847)662-1400 

oxt. 4605 

Job hotline: 

(647) 662-1400 

ext. 5606. 

Website; www. 

wairen.lako.kl2.ll.u3 

** * * *** * * ** ** ** 



BliaMaaMaaaaBiaicMfiJiiB 



I Sodexho Marriott Service 
has opportunities for: IT: 



* Food Service 
Workers 

* Cashiers , 



Get weekends & holidays nil. Work 
while kids art In school. Interested 
applicants please apply In person 
Mundelein 11.5. Cafeteria, 1350 
W. iUnley St., .Mundelein, IL 
(847) 949-2200 Ext 217 



Looking to... 

Buy? 

Sell? 

Work? 

Find it here in 
LAKELAND 

NEWSPAPERS 

Classified 

Section. 

Call To Place Your 
Ad Today II 
W847) 223-8161 



Warehouse 

DOCK WORKERS 

C0N-UW Is the leader In ihc Ut 
industry ... in growth, In profit, and 
most of all, in customer sen ice. Due 
in our tremendous growth, wc ha* e an 
immediate need for Dock Workers in 
our Munddcin, IL facility. You must 
he 18 years or older and provide veri- 
fiable employment history (including 
addresses and phone numbers). 
Starting pay of S 1 2.00/tir. 
For a nwrding career, contact: 

CON-VAYCEPfTrUL EXPRESS 

957 Tower Road 

- Munddcin, IL 60060 

Fax: 847-566-8747 

Phone 800-462-0969 

Email: caLjof>s@con-waycom 

Apply In person from Sam-Spm, M F. 

We conduct a pre-employment drug 

screen and background check. EOF. 

www.con-way.com 



B^BigMBMBJgiBJBfBJBJciMBllS 



y 



Lakeland's 

Classified 

Deadline is 

1 0:00 A.M. 
Wednesday 

Colfc(847) 223-8161 or 
Fox: (847) 223-2691 




BOBCAT OWNERS OPERATORS 

Top Pay! 

Plenty of work, Guaranteed hours. 
No wait for your money. Paid gas. 

(847)*7M747 



Call Center Opportunities- 
Great Place to Work! . 



Currently filling full time positions at our NEW call center 
location In lJt>crtyvlllc. 

Full time, year-round positions, with full benefits: 

■ LEAD-Customcr Sales & Service Rep— Lead lower 
level CSK's In call center or Internet .sales & service center 

Potential for temp lo perm employment, days or ewninus for 

■ Customer Sales & Service Representative— assist 
customers via phone & Internet 

■ Dula Entry Clerk-Enter Orders into system 

■ Offlce/Clcrlcal-varicty routine office work 

Business Is good; our pay & hentilts arc good: and we need 
good people. NOW. The only limitation to your growth will 
be your effort & your ability. The dress is business casual hut 
the work requires professionalism. Benefits for full time 
employees include company pd life, disability, holidays, sick, 
&. vacation; health & dental with free choice of provider. 
40 IK plan with employer match: big discounts on great 
products, After waiting peritjd, our temps are eligible for pd. 
Holidays, 40 IK, health & dental. 
Please call/or an appointment/or more Information. 

The Popcorn Factory, Inc. 

13970 W. Laurel Dr. 

Lake forest, IL 60045 

Phone 847-247-3353 or 

847-522-8301 
FAX 847-247-3340 EOE 




219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



FoodServtce 




VICTORY LAKES 



GREAT PAY, 
GOOD BENEFITS. 



Victory Lakes has the following post 
lions available for dedicated, hard- 
working people In our long lent) 
care facility and our retirement com- 
munity 



D1RTARY ASSISTANT 



This part time, Apm-Spm, position 
u ill assist In the dishroom, setting up 
carts and tray-line scrrice, serving 
trays, and cleaning up; might also 
assist In some aspects of food prepa- 
ration. 



C OO K 

This float (as- ncrdYd J position will 
prepare and sent meals, supervise 
kitchen staff. 



*************** 

BOOKEEPING 
ASSISTANT 

Full Time Position 

Lake County Nursing 

Home is seeking an 

individual experienced in 

Oulckbooks, accounts 

payable, purchase 

journal and resident trust 

fund. Various other 

duties as required. Pay 

based on experience. 

Call Dob Walton at 

(847)546-5300 



Full benefits package available ii 
you work at least 40 hrs. In a t»o- 
wcek period Mcasc apply in person 
at the Continuing Care Center, 
105$ Grand Avenue (just cast of 
Deep lake Road/, Undenfiurst, IL 
or call (847) 356-4551. EOE. 



220 



Help Wanted ■ 
Full-Time 



ACCOUNT 
ADMINISTRATOR 
Our Ideal candidate will 
have 2 + years of broker- 
age administrative in Word 
and Excel, a demonstrated 
ability to organize, prioritize 

and handle multiple pro- 
jects 

and Ihe interpersonal 
skills necessary to work ef- 
fectively with clients and 
co-workers." Series 7 ft- 
cense is a plus. To ex- 
press interest, fax resume " 
to: 847-8464 

First Union recognizes and. 
values the diverity of its' 
employees, customers and 
business partners. 
EOE M/F/D/V. 
A drug lasting employer 



"NOW HIRINGI POSTAL 
jobs: $34.000-$49.000/yr. 
Wildlife jobs: $35,900- 
$72,500/yr. NO experience, 
OK-APPLY TODAY. FREE 
CAall 1-888-726-0648 Ext. 
#3001. Sun.-Fri.: 9am- 
lOpm/cst. (SCA Network). 



imtismsmsimssssssvmsH 



$$ Bank OnIt$$ 



Administrate 

Assislant 

Casual Non-Smoking ofc. 

Data Entry, phones. A/R. P/R. 

Ejec. compensation, health 

ins.+ 401K. KJnnucan Co., 

20877 N. Nagel Court. 

Lake Buff 
" ph.847-234-5327 
fx.847-234-3260 



Tellers-WILL TRAIN 

with good cash handling 

experience. SSSSSSSS 

Teller Supervisors- 

toSZ'lk' 

Personal Bankers.. 

lo S27K 

Loan Assistant- 

to S27K 

244tt)16 or 549-0016 

Superior Personnel! 



istwitKmifmimmimti 



$505 WEEKLY GUAR- 
ANTEED WORKING FOR 
THE GOVERNMENT FROM 
HOME PART-TIME. NO EX- 
PERIENCE REQUIRED. 1- 
800-748-5716 Ext, X102 
(SCA Network). 



ADMINISTRATIVE 
ASSISTANT 

Small Grayslake firm 
needs person lo assist 
owner, perform light re- 
ception duties and han- 
dle phones. Computer 
skills necessary. 

Call 847-548-6600 
or fax 847-548-6699 



DRYWALL HANGERS 

WANTED FULLTIME 

LOCATED IN 

WAUCONDA 

CALL: 

ALTMAN DRYWALL 

847-526-TAPE 



APARTMENT 
MANAGER 

Position to become avail- 
able between Jan. 2001- 
Fcb. 2001. Free apartment 
provided & monthly pay. 
Call to inquire today! 
Prestige Apartments, 
Kenosha, WI. 
414-258-1719 



ARE YOU CONNECTED? IN- 
TERNET USERS WANTED! 
S25-S75/HR-PT/FT. 
www.BeBossFree.com 
{SCA Network) 



To Place An Ad With 




NEWSPAPERS 



Coll (847) 223-81 61 or Fax (847) 223-2691 



DO YOU SPEAK JAPANESE? 

INTERNATIONAL SALES SUPPORT 

DIRECT HIRE 



IAdccco is currently recruiting for an experienced 
customer service representative with strong sales 
support background and bilingual abilities in 
-Japanese. Posilion will support sales team in an m 
international company located in the northern 

I suburbs. Fax resume to Mary Jo (847) 56Cv2 116. 

!■ ■ mmam m w ■ ^smm u ammm ■ w* 



Inside Sales Part-Time 



We're looking for a few good people! 

Would you like to be part of a dynamic sales and marketing 

team? Our busy classified telephone sales department Is 

funking for a few jjood people with strong customer-service 

orientation and good communication and sates skills. 

Do yon have Self-confidence and a positive attitude. 

Great Communication and phone skills. 

Time- management and organizational skills. 

Sales skills. Persistence and the ability to handle 

rejection. Inltallvc. A sense of humor. 

Customer-service orientation. Problem-solving and 

decision-making skills. Creativity A desire to 

learn. Ability to work well with others. 

Sounds like you? Scnd/Kax us your resume. We can oiler a good 

starting salary, a generous commission plan and opportunities for 

training and advancement. Mother's hours available. 



Lakeland Media '■• Attn: Bob Schroeder 
30 S. Whitney St. • Grayslake • Fax'(847) 223-2691 



220 



Help Wanted 
-Full-Time 



ATTENTION : 

COMPUTER, INTERNET 

PEOPLE WANTED 

TO WORK ONLINE 

S 125-$ 175 an hour. 

FULLTRAINING 
Vacations, Bonuses 

& Incentives 

BI-UNGUALS ALSO 

NEEDEO 

49 Countries. 

FREE E-BOOK 

(647)395-8053 

www.hom oblzkk.com 



CHARTWEUS 

NOW HIRING 

****Full/Part Time*"* 

•FOOD SERVICE 

WORKERS 

•CASHIERS 

Excellent Hours! 

Great Payt Hiring Bonus) 

Call W7-270-B317 



fle rlC ?! 

Accounts Receivable 
THE YWCA hasanimmo 
diate opening for an ac- 
counts receivable clerk. 
Our successful candidate 
must have 1 year experi- 
ence, and be detail ori 
ented with computer skills 
including. Word & Excel. 
This is a full-time posilion 
with benefits. Send resume 
to: 

YWCA 2133 BelvidereRd 
Wkgn, IL 60085 
Phone 847-662-4247 
or fax 847-662-4752 
EOE 



Clerical 
DATA ENTRY 

lintry IjivcI 

but not for long! 

Small, friendly, and pro- 
fessional Libertyville 
CPA lirm is looking to 
train an individual with 
good 10 key skills. We 
provide: 401 K and profit 
sharing plan; flex time is 
available. 
Please call/fax resume: 
l'h (847) 247-1040 
Fx: (847) 367-1026 



CREW CHI 



in 



INSTRUMENT 
OPERATOR 

Needed Tor land survey 

firm, Experience in 

boundary, topographical. 

construction staking, A 

data collection. Benefits: 

Health Ins., 40] K. 

SEND ItESUME: 

R.E.Allen and 

Associates, 

31 S.StusserSt., 

Grayslake, II. 60030 or 

FAX (847) 223-0880 



Customer Service 

EURO-TECH INC. 
PERFECT JOB 

Earn S8-S10 hr. 
to START 

Approaching Customers & 

regislenng ihem tor FREE 

demonstrations on various 

Home Improvements: 

■ NO expereince needed. 

■ PAIO traing 

■ FLEXIBLE hours 

■ Inside major retail chain. 

■ Crystal Lake, Rolling 
Meadows & Gurnee 

■ START immediately 

■ MGMT opportunities 
S10&UPI 

7b sef-up an interview 

Phono: 800-215-8712 

or 847-299-3876 

Ask for Mr. David 



Do you enjoy working with 
people? Arc ymt a fun, outgo- 
ing person who cnjiijs .i 
challenge? We're looking tor a 
reliable pentun who is nnsin- 
l/ed ant.1 possesses oiumjikI- 



ine lime management and 
customer .sen-Ice skills . 



Experience in the insist 
office of a medical practice 
with attention to detail a 
must. In return, you will 
receive a competitive salary 
& benefit package as well as 
a fulfilling career In our con- 
tinually growing outpatient 
facilities located In Illinois 
and Wisconsin. Interested 
candidates should submit 
tbclr resumes with refer- 
ences In {terson to 



15 Commerce Drive 
(ir;iysl;ike. IL or by fax to 
alto: June or Tina 
(262) 65 -t 50'; . 



I" 



B14 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFII 



December 1,2000 



I.. 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fiill-TmiL 1 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



*i 



EARN S25,000-S50,0a0/YR. 
MEDICAL insurance Billing 
Assistance Needed Imme- 
diately! Use your Home Com- 
puter for great potential an- 
nual income. Call now! 1-800- 
291-4683 oxt 407 (SCA Net- 
work) 

EASY WORKI 
NO EXPERIENCE 

$500-$1,000 part-time at 

home stuffing envelopes. 

For free Information send 

sell-addressed, 

stamped envelope: 

R&J Enterprises 

Mailing Services, Inc. 

P.O. Box 402 
Ingieside, III. 60041. 



INSIPE TECHNICAL 

TELEPHONE SALES 
Supplying to Broadcast In- 
dustries. Team players will 
excel In our casual but hard 
working environment. Ex- 
cellent benefits 

Mundeleln area 

Call: {847)049-9944. 



Entry Level 

EDITORIAL 

REPORTERS 

& & & & 

Lakeland Newspapers is 
looking for people wild n 
passion mid n knack for 
journalism; This run- 
time writing position will 
give the right candidates 
n chance to get his or her 
foot in the door as a local 
community journalist, 
covering the full gamut 
of stories that happen 
weekly in one of our Lake 
County communities. 
Please send /FAX resume 
with cover letter to: 

Lakeland 
Newspapers 

Attn: Bob Sctirocdcr 

30 S. Whitney Street 
Grayslake, IL60030 
FAX: 847-223-8810 



SECRETARY 

Excellent communication and organizational 

skills required. Proficient in document 

preparation using Microsoft Office. Full-time 

(12mos.) Salary in the low to middle 20's. 

Send or fax resume to: 

Jeff Brlerton 

Technology Campus 

19525 W. Washington Grayslake IL. 

60030 

Fax : (847) 223-7363 



\k 



HUMAN RESOURCE/SECRETARY 11 MONTH 
Wauconda Community UnitSchool Ditrict #118-59.84/ hour 
Including benefits. 

District Office: 11 month position(220 days) 
Available : Immediately 

Qualifications: High School Grad, computer knowledge, 
applitude for figures, organizational skills, communication 
skills, and ability to respect the confidential nature of the po- 
sition 

Send cover letter and resume to: Mr. Daniel J. Coles, Direc- 
tor of Human Resources,555 North Main Street, Wauconda, 
Illinois 60084 or call 847-526-7690, ext. 109 

AN EQUAL OPPOTUNITY EMPLOYER 
WE HIRE ONLY U S. CITIZEN AND LAWFULLY AUTHORIZED ALIEN WORKERS 



UJELDER 

Arc you lookine, for a better and cleaner work 
environment where you look forward to coming to 
work? Wc may have what you are looking for. 

La Force has been in the Chlcagoland area for 
many years and now lias a brand new building. We 
have weld (wire feed) light gauge metal, H, 16, 
& 18 ga and other metal shop work. 

We offer $12/hour, depending on skills and expe- 
rience with good benefits to the qualified candi- 
date. Please call or stop in at; 

. • LAFOIICE, INC. * 

280 Corporate Woods Pkwy 

Vernon Hills, IL 60061 

Ph: (847) 634-2828 

800-672-6795, ext. 2249 

www.laforccinc.com 

E-mail; lir@laforcclnc.com 

Equal opportunity employer 



SALESPERSON 



Do you want to work for a growing, progressive 
company? We offer a challenging career selling 
the supply and installation of architectural 
hardware, wood & steel doors to commercial end 
users such as Universities, school districts, hospitals, 
retail and industrial businesses throughout the 
Chicagoland area. 

If you do, please read on. Some experience in a 
construction related field would be helpful. The 
successful candidate should have at least an 
associate degree, though a four year degree would 
be welcome. 

Please visit our website for more information on our 
company and a detailed job description. Please 
send, fax, resume to: Attn.Patrlck Costello 

La Force 

280 Corporate Woods Pkwy 

Vernon Hills, IL 60061 

(847) 634-2828 or 800-236-8858. 

Fax# 847-634-2727. 

www.taforceinc.com 

Email; pic@laforceinc.com 



Experienced 

insuiRTion 

inSTfiUERS 

needed. 

Drivers license required. 

Hiring bonus & benelits 

Builders Insulation 

Spring Grove, IL 

815-675-0685 



HAIRSTYLISTS 



HOUSEKEEPERS 

Full & Part Time 
A growing cleaning 
service seeks lo Till 
weekday housekeeper 
positions. Flexible 

hours, no weekends & 
no evenings. Will train. 
Must speak English. 
Colt Stncl at Pro-Maids 
for more Information. 
(047)514-6055 



Groat Clips 
K for hair. 



"Excollont Pay and 

Bonollt Package** 

Now Hiring in Llbortyvltlo 

& Grayslako. 

Please call fur information 

(847) 57 1-1977 



GREAT OPPORTUNITY 
EARN excellent Income at 
home assembling products. 
7 day a week. Call 1-800-657- 
0575 Pin W9603 (SCA Net- 
work). 



HOLIDAY INN 
GURNEE 

Is looking for qualified 

workers to fill the 

below positions: 

/WaitersAVaitresses 

•Busboys 

/Banquet Workers 

/Kitchen- Dishwashers 

/Cooks 

Ploaso caff 

336-6300 X 630 



Mailroom/ 

Receiving 

Clerk 

Mailr oonvReceivmg Dopl. 

al Medical School seeks 3 

MS grad who is physically 

capable of occasional 

heavy lifting. Valid IL 

driver's license required. 

Previous receiving/ 

mailroom exp. as well as 

computer background 

desirable. 

Ploaso slop by & 

complete application 

M-F. 8am~4pm 

or mail/fax rosumo to: 

Personnel Dlr., 

FUHS/Chlcago 

Modlcal School, 

3333 Green Day Rd., 

North Chicago, I L 60064 

FAX: 

(847)578-3272. 
EOE 



TO PUCE AN AD WITH 
LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS 
Call (847) 223-81 61 



RETAIL SALES 



Professional Sales People Nme&md for 
Expanding Furniture Showroom, 




Employee Benefits + 401k + Vacation pay. 
Bilingual a plus. Contact: Gary Wltkowskl 

LEATB FURNITURE 

3608 Grand Ave, Gumce, IL 60031 
[B47| 336-3800 




Clean Out That Clutter 
In Your Garage!!! 

Tis the season to make that extra SSS for the 
holidays by having a garage sale. Place your garage 

sale ad in all 11 hometown papers, Lakeland 
Newspaper, The Great Lakes Bulletin & The Market 

Journal by calling (847} 223-8161, ask for Lisa. 



• OPEN HOUSE • CHEN HOUSE • OPEN 
OUSE • OPEN HOUSE •OPEN HOUSE • 



UJ 

CO 



CO 



I..! 
CO 



tJLI 

n_ 
O 



tn 



INSTALLERS 

Don't you want to work for a company 

that values its employees & offers excellent 

compensation, outstanding benefits 

& advancement opportunities? 

Due to AT&T Broadband's growth, wo have opportunities for 
reliable & responsible Individuals to loin our dynamic team. 



COME VISIT US AT OUR 

OPEN HOUSE 

December 6th, 2000 • 9am to 6pm 
1585 Waukegan Road In Waukegan 

Directions only call: 847-336-7200. 
We will be conducting On-Slto Interviews! ' 



Stop by our Open House to inquire about this Great 
Opportunity... AT&T Broadband also offers stock-purchase 
plan, 401 K, free cable, work/family programs & a positive 
& supportive atmosphere. Drug screen & background 
check as well as a valid driver's license are required of 
successful candidates. If unable lo attend, please fax 
resume to: 847-240-2323, or fill out an application at: 
AT&T Broadband, 1585 Waukegan Rd. E-MAIL: 
work.att©broadband.attcom Visit us © jobs.attbls.com 
EOE 



en 



CO 



ART 



nnn* nn a »ii 
OnUMMBMIll 



Public Safety 
Officers 

immediate) opening (or night 

shift full & pari lime. Uniform 

provided. Excellent benefits. 

Drug Iree workplace 

Apply in Person 

Vacation Village 

6800 State Park Road 
Fox Lflko, IL 60020 



Nursorv Office/Sales 
An active, last-paced whole- 
sale nursery center is seek- 
ing a full-lime inside sales- 
person. Applicant should be 
well organized with good 
computer and phono skills, 
plus a good general knowl- 
edge of plant names. Ex- 
perience in the nursery in- 
dustry is preferred. 
Please call, FAX or send 
resume to: 
Charlos J. Floro Co.,lnc. 
Attn: Janet 
16606 W.Hwy 22 
Prairie View, IL 60069 

(847)913-1414 
FAX(847)913-9690 



PARENT COUNSELOR 
YWCA has an immediate 
opening for a Bilingual 
Parent Counselor to assist 
parents in linding Child 
Care. An Associates 
Degree or BA preferred 
in Education. Early Child 
Care or Social Services, 
Excellent oral and written 
communication and com- 
puter skills along with oc- 
casional nights and Satur- 
days are required. Please 
send resume to: 

YWCA 

2133 BELVIDERE RD. 

WAUKEGAN, IL 60085 

OR FAX: 

847-662-4752 



PAINTERS WANTED 

FULLTIME 

LOCATED IN 

WAUCONDA 

CALL: 

ALTMAN DRYWALL 

847-526-TAPE 



POSTAL JOBS 

S48.323.00YR. Now Hiring- 
No experionce-paid Training- 
great benifils. Call 7 days 800- 
429-3660 ext: J3226(SCA 
Network). 

POSTAL JOBS S9- 

S14.25/HR. +Federal Bene- 
fits. NO experience, exam 
info, call 1-800-391-5856 
X4214 8am-9pm/est. Local 
not guar. {SCA Network). 



* O Proschool Q ft 

Seeking qualified lead 

teacher and substitutes 

for child care center in 

Lake County. 

(847) 263-0074. 

Will pay up to 

$12 an hourl 



Receptionist 
General Office 

help needed lor Whole- 
sale Carpet Design in.Lib- 
ortyville. This is a full-lime 
position. Duties include 
answering phones, data 
entry and handling 
claims. Top pay. Call 
Skip at (847) 549-9500. 



^ HEED TO PLACE A 
HELP WANTED AD? 
Call (047) 223-8161 



Meridian Group, Inc., 

Property Management Company has a full and 

part-time position available at a 36-unit apartment 

complex located in Island Lake Illinois. This position 

includes administrative duties and limited 

maintenance duties, Some office skills required. 

We are willing to train the right person. 

Call for an application or send resume lo: 

MERIDIAN GROUP.1NC. 

104 A MAPLE CT. 

ROCHELLE, IL 61068 

815-562-1867 



ELECTRONIC FUNDS TRANSFER SPECIALIST 
This position processes funds , Iransfer transactions, 
including Correspondent Credit Union Money Transfers, 
Western Union Transfers, and Bank to Bank Wires, direct de 
posit and payment transactions. To be successful, you'll 
need 

the ability to work on a variety of tasks simultaneously, 
strict at 

lention to detail, accuracy. 10-key adding machine skill, the 
ability lo lake verbal inslructions and work at a fast pace 
within 

strict lime deadlines. In return for your skills, GLCU offers 
excellent compensation, medical/denial/vision plans, 401 K 
with company matching , tuition reimbursement and a busi 
ness casual environment geared toward developing your ca 
reer potential. Please send/fox/e-mail resume including sal- 
ary 

expectations to : Staffing GLCU, 2525 N. Groon Bay Rd., 
North Chicago, IL 60084. Fax (847)578-7016 
E-mail: ollvnsPBalcu.orQ. Chock us out on the Web at 



EOE 



General 



CHANGE CAREERS? 



YOU CAN 



DOIT!!! 



•- « i i 4 • ■ 



- it E0E s 



• OPEN HOUSE • OPtfJ HOUSE • OPEN 
■OUSE • OPFU HflUSffii OPEN HOUSE •• 



Uniforms Unlimited, Inc. is a direct mail older company specialiflng 

in uniforms for the allied health care professions. We pride 

ourselves in the delivery of outstanding customer service through a 

team-oriented approach. If you aie looking to change careers, here's 

your chance! 

Our employees enjoy a clean and professional working environment, 
competitive wages, major medical benefits, profit sharing, and the 
experience of growing with a rapidly expanding company. The 
following opportunities arc available lo join the Uniforms Unlimited, 
Inc. team. 

Customer Service Representatives 

Take incoming customer calls (or new and existing orders. 
Familiarity with a computer keyboard and excellent communication 
skills are necessary, We ship our customer orders in 24 hours! Our 
customer service needs are from 10:30am • 7pm, Full lime, posi- 
tions are available during these hours. Every oilier Saturday is 
required. These positions start at SlO/hr. 

Data Entry 

Entry Level 

Utilize your excellent Data Entry skills in oui fast-paced, 
pleasant environment. Position requires good communication, 

organizational and interpersonal abilities. Hours are flexible 

between days and evenings. S10 pei hour. 

Please respond to Ruth Erbach, 847-821-7755, 700 
Corporate Woods Parkway, Vernon Hills, IL 60061. 
or fax to 847-821-8885. EOE 



uniforms unlimited ,lnc. 



ROD 
PERSONNEL 

Land Surveying firm 
seeks Hod Personnel' lo 
assist Crew Chief In the 
field. Benefits: llenllh 
Ins., 40 IK. 

SEND RESUME: 

R.E.ALLEN, 

3IS.SlusserS«., 

Grayslake, IL 60030 or 

FAX (847) 223-0080. 



Social Services 

CIMA/IIAK AIDES 
FULLANIJ PART TIME 
CtMA l\ IABAIIJES NEED- 
ED IN OUR 15 IJEI) 
INTERMEDIATE CAIIE 
FACILITY 
S500.00 
SIGN IN BONUS 
ON SITE DA AND MA 
PROGRAM OI-TERED. 
WE WILL TRAIN & 
CERT I IT THE 

APPROPRIATE 

CANDIDATE. 

E.O.E. 

INQUIRE WITHIN. 

(047) 055-3450 

I ISA SC1I HAM M 



SPECIAL ED/ 

INSTRUCTIONAL 

AIDES 

High School degree re- 

quirod. F/T benelits, 

tuilion reimbursement 

single med./dental ins; 

paid sick, personal, & 

bereavement days. 

Six paid holidays. 

S8.50/hr and up. Call: 

847-353-5670 

or fax 

847-634-5334 

APTAKIS1C-TRIPP 

DISTRICT 102 

BUFFALO GROVE.ILL 



in Like 
Ulu Tf is looking for 

nn experienced 
niNDERV PERSON * 
PRESS PERSON.' FjVll 
lime'.' benefits package 
including retirement 
program, insurance & 
vacation. 

847-234-6430 



TEACHER 
ASSISTANTS 

are you 

looking for a position 

in an awesome 

CHILD 

CARE CENTER 

in Lincolnshire 

call now 

seniors welcomed 

EOE 

847-634-1982 



Want to Save 
Big Bucks?? 

@®®®@® 

I.AKELANDS 

CLASSIFIEDS 

CAN HELP YOU FIND 

THE RIGHT 

EMPLOYEES FASTtI 

TO PLACE YOUR JOB 

OPPORTUNITIES IN 

OUR CLASSIFIED 

SECTION, JUST CALL 

MONDAY-FRIDAY, 

8AM-5PM. 
(B47)223-fll6Ior 
Fax (047) 223-2691 



WAREHOUSE 
WORKER 

Pull lime warehouse 
work. Must bo able to op- 
erate forklift and lili 70 
lbs, license. Liberlyville 
area. For an iippt,, call 
Doyu at (fU7) liHO-3222 



WILDLIFE JOBS $8- 
S19/HR.+FEDERAL Benefits. 
Park rangers, security and 
maintenance. NO experience 
far some. For inlo call 1-Q00- 
391-5856 x. 4215, 9arn- 
9pm/est. Local nol guar 
(SCA Network). 



•<?r 1, 2000 



Iclp Wanted 
FiiU-TJme 



December 1, 2000 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Timc 



221 



Medical 
Opportunities 



221 



Medical 
Opportunities 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Lakeland Newspapers / B1 5 




'Medical 
Opportunities 




Medical 
Opportunities 



221 



Medical 
Opportunities 



228 



Situations Wanted 



\D 
)NNEL 

:yinf! firm 

crsoniiL'l lo 
"hicf in llic 
Its: ilr.il (li 

iSIIMIJ: 
LLEN, 

sserSt., 
IL 60030 or 
223-0980. 



J 



3S 

lB aides 

part time 

.|DESNEBD> 

mis urn? 

JIATIiCAim 
I.ITY. 
0.00 
BONUS 

iAANDMA 

I OrTl-HHI). 

.TRAIN & 

EYTIIE 

U'lUATH 

UDATIi 

D.I:. 

■ WITHIN. 

55-9150 

JIIIAMM 



IAL ED/ 

CTIONAL 

DES 

ol degree re- 

/T benefits," 

nbursemeru 

d./dental ins; 

personal, & 

ment days. 

i holidays. 

ind up. Call: 

53-5670 

r tax 

34-5334 

SIC-TRIPP 

1ICT102 

i GROVE.ILL 



rjjjjufjn lake 
looking for 
purlcnccd 
r PERSON & 
ERSON. Ffiil 
cflts packai{L» 
retirement 
insurance & 

•34-3430 



kCHER 

STANTS 
eyq'ii 

or a position 

awesome 

HILD 

CENTER 
colnshire 
ill now 

welcomed 

334-1982 



t to Save 
Sucks?? 

ELANDS 
iSIEIEDS 
.P YOU FIND 
[RIGHT 

YE ES FASTI! 
!E YOUR JOB 
('UNITIES IN 
LASSIFIED 
ii JUST CALL 
AY-FRIDAY, 
VI -5PM. 
23-0161 or 
7) 223-2G91 



JOBS S8- 
DERAL Bonolits. 
*rs, security and 
J. NO experience 
or inlo call 1-800- 
x. 4215. 9am- 
.ocal not guar, 
irk). 



j 



EHOUSE 


IRKER 


ie vvau'liousL' 
si bu able to up- 
did and lili 70 
isc. Llbcriyvitlc 
an iip|i!., call 
'17) GU0-:i222 



I : 



WARFHClHSg/OFFlCE 
ASSISTANT 

Wanted Full lime for the 
Mundelein office of our fast- 
paced automotive after- 
market company. Some 
driving required. We otter 
insurance, profit sharing, 
and many more beneitls, 
$9.00 an hour with for po- 
tential for advancement 
Contact Miss Hottl. 
(630)617-3912 



CLINICIAN 

Growing Lake Forest 
Urology practice looking for 

a clinician or nurse. 

Qualified applicants can be 

medical assts. or LPN's. 

Benefits available, 
Please call 847-295-0010 
or fax your resume to 
847-295-5433. * 



WORK PROM HOME. Mail 
order business. S522/a week 
PT. $1,000-S4,000/a week 
FT. Full Training. Free Book- 
let. 

(847)229-6752 
www.dreamrctreat.com 



CNA-PartTJme. 
Needed in pleasant 
home environment In 
Antioch, I L Mom seek- 
ing assistance in taking 
care of sedentary 19 yr 
old disabled boy. 
(847) 838-8290 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



WEB DEUELOPER 

Due to rapid growth, Chlcagoland's premier In- 
ternet Service Provider is in search of a Web 
Developer. This individual will work with 
customers and develop sites. Knowledge of 
HTML and JAVA Scrip! required. If you are inter- 
ested in creating a future wtlh a rapidly growing 
organization, fax resume to skw, (847) 223-8(110 
or e-mail: skw@us-netdirect.com 




SUBSTITUTE ,';* „ 
DIRECTORY „ 

The following schools need ~^-' * 

substitutes on a continuing basis, please contact 
the names listed below for further Information, 

Requirement - Bachelor's Degree & 
Substitute Certification 

Adlai E. Stevenson High School District # 125 

Two Stevenson Drive, Lincolnshire, 1L 60069 

Contact: Personnel x 320 (847) 63-HOOO 

Antioch Community High School District #117 

1 133 Main St., Antioch, IL 60002 

ContacU Waric \tl*t ..',....: .(8-17) 395-H21 

Aptaklstlc - Tripp School District #102 

1231 Wetland Road, Buffalo Grove, IL 6008? 

Contact: Pem (847) 353-5670 

Grass Lake School District #36 

26177 W. Grass lake Road, Antioch, IL 60002 

Contact: Paul or Sue (B47) 395-1550 

Grayslakc School District #46 

565 Fredrick Road, Grayslakc, I L 600 30 

Contact: Jan Fabry x5319 (847) 223-3650 

Hawthorn School District #73 . 

201 Hawthorn Parkway, Vernon Hills, IL 60061 

Contact: Shiri Kcena (847) 367-3279 

Lake Forest Elementary Schools 

95 W. Dccrpath, Lake Forest, IL 60045 

Contact: Karen Alilc (817) 604-7423 

Lake Villa School District #41 

131 McKJnley, Lake Villa, IL 60046 

Contact: Kalhy (847) 356-2385 

Libertyvllle School Disrlct #70 

144 1 W. Lake Street, Libcrtyville, IL 60048 

Contact: Cindy Flaicko (847) 362-9023 

Nipper-sink School District #2 

2018 Main Strect.Spring Grove, IL 60081 

Contact: Juc (8*7) 675-2342 

Wauconda School District #118 

555 N. Main Street, wauconda, IL 60084 

Contact: Lois (847) 526-7690 

Waukcgan School Dist. #60 

1201 N. Sheridan ltd., Waukcgan, IL 60085 

Contact: Elaine Urowder (847) 360-5406 

Woodland School District #50 

17370 Gages Lake Road, Gages Lake, IL 60030 

Contact: Jody (847) 856-3605 



FULL OR PART TIME POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

Traditions USA is a manufacturer of College Graduation 

Products. Wo offer a fast paced friendly environment. 

Salary is commensurate with experience. We are curronlly 

looking to fill the following two (2) positions: 

CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE: 

Qualified candidalo must be dependable and have attention 

lo detail. Responsibilities Include customer contact and 
order entry. Strong communication skills and PC knowledge 

a plus. 

WORDPR0CESS1NG SPECIALIST 

Person will bo responsible for printing College Graduation 

Announcements. Knowledge of Wordprocessing required. 

Please send or tax resume to: 

Lyann Jung 

Traditions USA 

951 N. Old Rand Rd, Sto. 114 

Wauconda, Illinois 60084-1269 

Fax: 1-888-550-8723 



COME JOIN OUR TEAM 
Full/Time Front Desk Asso- 
ciate needed for busy North 
Shore Pediatric Practice. 
Computer experience a 
plus. Non-Smoking environ 
ment. Comprehensive ben 
etit package, call today 
(647)480- 2665 to JOIN 
OUR TEAM! 



DENTIST 

Mlnnesota/lmmed Open- 
ings. Escape road rage at 
our well-osl'd multi doctor 
practice loe'd in the beau- 
tiful, laid-back Bralnerd 
Lakes area. Qualified 
Dentists guaranteed 

S9000/mo with potential 
for more. 

For more Info call Dr. 
Skinner or Dr. Harrison 
000-477-7645 



Health care 
Outpatient Clinic 

Bustling family practice 

clinics are searching (or 

experienced candidates 

for the following positions: 

Gurnee location Full-time 

Medical Assistant 



MENTAL HEALTH 
COUNSELING 

Ifynuliavca tlachclor's 

Degree and /or are 

Interested in gaining 

experience in social 

services please contact: 

Catherine Jose" 

910 Washington Park 

Waukcgan, II. 60085 

PI 1: 847-623-01 00 

Fax: 847-623-91 12 

E-mail: 

Lake Park Centor@aol.com 

EOE 



Zion Fulf-time 
Waukcgan Part-time. 

Receptionist 

Lindenhurst Full-time 
We offer an excellent ben- 
efits package to our Full 
and Part time employees, 

including medical/ 

dental/lite, paid vacations, 

tuition reimbursement and 

morel For consideration, 

please fax resume or 

apply in person to Human 

Resources 



Midwestern Regional 
Medical Center 



2520 Elisha Ave. 

Zion, IL 60099 

Fax: (847) 872-6222 

Phone: (847) 872-6163 

Emja^o^tu^iih^rnDjoyer 



RECEPTIONIST 
We are looking (or a hard 
working , outgoing individual 
with greal interpersonal skills 
to work in a busy family prac- 
tice office. Phone and com- 
puter skills required . In- 
surance knowledge a plus. 

F/Thrs 

10-6 Mon.,Tues.,Thurs„ 

Frl.,rotating Sal. 9-noon. 

Send resume to : 

847-587-4839 

or contact Janis at: 

PINTO/THOMAS M.D. 

248 E. GRAND AVE. 

FOX LAKE, IL.60020 



\ 



Midwestern 

"(K»»l lUtfll 'MTU 




NURSES 

RN'S & LPN'S for home 

health . F/T or P/T. All 

shifts. Rex scheduling. 

Private Duly. 

Benelits for F/T. 

AMERICAN HOME 

HEALTH 

1-800-872-4427 



TO PUCE AN AD WITH 

LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS 
Call (847) 223-8161 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time . 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Tinu'. 




How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search 

By Nancy Sakol 






». f m. ,. m t. 



Q Three ye»m bro I applied far u customer (service posl- 
litin in u Im-rc desirable corporation and was Inter- 
■ viewed by »omcone in (he person nncl department who 
villi ill nt 1 would be culled buck in fur a second Interview, At thai 
lime, instead of being called buck Tor un Interview, 1 was contact- 
ed by the person who interviewed me and told that one or my for- 
mer employers, (nume withheld) for whom 1 worked 5 years until 
I'M stated that (dry showed no record of me. The Individual in 
personnel asked me to Follow through and find out why they are 
staling that I was never employed there. I was angry, never fol- 
lowed through and moved on, accepting another position that wns 
offered to me, elsewhere. Here it Is three years later. I hate once 
again turned In my resume to this corporation in hopes of obtain- 
ing a position in their customer service department. 1 received a 
call from someone in personnel who asked me if I had ever uppllrd 
with them. 1 told them I hud n few years ago, however, had accept- 
ed another position Hint was offered lo me at the lime. They said 
that they would like to bring me in for an Interview. During the 
course of the interview they showed me my resume that I previ- 
ously turned In Hire years ago, and placed It next to my new 
resume. They asked why It was that a company that I said that 1 
worked at for 5 years when I first met with them, no longer 
appears on my current resume. I told them that is was because Ihe 
company was telling people that I never worked there. A few days 
have passed since Ihe Inlcrvlew und I was wailing to hear whether 
or not I got the Job, when a letter came for me from the company 
staling (hnl due to Ihe inconsistency In reporting of Information lo 
the campoany, that they regret lo Inform me thai Ihcy would not 
be considering me for employement at this lime. A notation on the 
teller iillnched was from Ihe company that I had worked for those 
nvc years staling, "never employed here.** 1 am including my 
name, dates or employment and social security number. Please tell 
me you can help me find out whul Is going on? S.K. - (via e-mail) 

A My guess Is that the fin.! time you applied with this com- 
■ pany, and Ihey were Informed you were never employed 
■ fur 5 years al Ihe company you slated, your application 
was more than likely nagged for Information thai was assumed not 
viable or not verifiable. When Ihey usked whether or nol you had 
ever applied Tor a position with litem before, and you answered, 
"yes" they already knew the answer. They were merely wulilng for 
your response. I liuvc done some checking for you at your request, 
Ihey Informed me Ihnl Ihey have absolutely no record of anyone with 
your name ever being employed with Ihetr corporation or any of 
their afnilbtes. In a case as this, there are obvious situations that 
should l>c addressed, such as whether or not you have had a name 
change or perhaps you were employed wlih your muldcn name. 
There U also the |>osslhitfty that a person may not have been direct- 
ly employed by Ihe ctimpuny, but rulher as a contract employee, thus 
esplulnlng why u corporation does nol show you were empluyed. In 
vour case, however, the corporation you mentioned was ohle lo look 
up your s**tul security number a; a second means or veriflcallon, 
however, I am sorry In say, Ihey si ill lasts! there Is no record urynur 
employment with ihelr corporation, in any capacity, In any division. 
Therefore, when tiny employer will cull to get a reference on you, 
Ihey will be told Ihe same thing, leuvlng any polcnllul employer with 
■lucstlnn us to Ihe validity or your resume. I would take the time to 
figure this nut on your own. If you still Insist you were employed 
Iherc, contact them dlrcclly bul contact them professionally. 
Good Luck. Sand your Inquiries to our new wohslto; 
www.auperiorperaonnel.com 

Note: Nancy Snkol Is a licensed personnel professional 
and President of Superior Personnel In Gumec. 

Letters eon be sent to Nancy Sakol 

c/o Lakeland Newspapers, 
P.O. BOX 268, Grnyslako, If- 6P030 . 

';■ • PLACEMienol.com' ■ « • ■ ■ 



PHARMACIST 

Washington State/lmmed 
Opening. F/t, 70k min 
-tbnfls. Human Resourc- 
es. Mid-Valley Hospi- 
tal, PO Box 793, OmoJc, 
WA 98841; 509-026- 
7643 



PRSG 
•RN -CNA 

We are accepting applic- 
ations FT/PT in a 70 .bed 
ambulatory ICF. No uni- 
forms, good wages, 
pleasant atmosphere, a 

place people enjoy 
going to work each day. 

Contact: 
Bob Bundy.Adm. 
Sheltering Oaks 

Island Luke, IL. 
847-526-3636 



THE WATERS 

Whoro Comfort Runs Deep 
Are you seeking a new 
oppty which otters exciting 
challenges & unlimited 
opptys lor growth & ad- 
vancement? 

RHLPHCNA 
Nursing Management 
Healthcare Administration 
PT, OF & Speech Therapist 
The Waters is a network of 
31 long term care nursing 
facilities dedicated to pro- 
viding top quality care to 
our residents. We have em 
ployment opptys in our 14 
INDIANA & 2 WISCONSIN 
facilities. Call today & hear 
what we have to otter. We 
provide exc wages & bnfts 
including: med, dent & life 
insurance, tuition asst, relo 
allowances, career track 
planning & much more! For 
more info check out our 
website www.thewaters.net 
or call 000-388-2820 
X2813. EOE 



HwWvart 

Be Proud to Make a 
■ Difference In Your 
MEDICAL CAREER! 

Be There for Patients & 
Families When They 
Desperately Need Your 
CARING EXPERTISE. 



Numerous Rewards 
Await You At Vitas 
Hospice. We Have 
Immediate Openings 
For MDs, RNs, LPNs, 
Admission Coordinators 
and CNAs. 



Flexible Scheduling and 

Excellent Benefits are 

available, serving ' all 

Chicagotand suburbs. 

Work close to home! 

(FT, PT & Pool) 

Start Making a 

Difference Todayl 

Vitas Healthcare 

Corporation 

1-800-890-8120 

Ext, #4577 

* (244m Hotline) EOE • 

S ~ * 

Looking to... 

Buy? 

Sell? 

Work? 

Find it here in 

LAKELAND 
NEWSPAPERS 

Classified 
Section. 

Call To Place Your 
Ad Today!) 
\ (847) 223-8161, 



NEED TO PUCE A 

MEDICAL 

OPPORTUNITIES 

HELP WANTED AD? 

Call 
(847) 223-8161 



CERTIFIED 

NURSING ASSISTANT 

TRAINING COURSE 



Are you Interested in 

receiving free training?. 

Wauconda Healthcare & 

Rehabilitation Centre 
is offering a Stale approved 
course beginning December 
4th to train nursing assistants 
at no cost to you. Wort part 
time while training right here 
in our facility. Students who 
graduate from our couise and 
continue full time employ- 
ment for sin months, receive a 
bonus. 
POSITIONS ARE ALSO 
AVAILABLE FOR CN_Aj 
(ALREADY CERTIFIED) 
176 Thomas Court 
Wauconda, IL 60084 
(847) 526-5551 EOE 



Healthcare Positions 

CALIFORNIA/ 
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS 

Exrrlteiire It In Our 

Nature! ,. 

St. Joseph Health System- 
Humboldt County, is a. member 
ol the prestigious St. Joseph of 
Orange healthcare system, a 
values-based organization. Our 
hospitals, St. Joseph in Eureka 
& Redwood Memorial In 
For l una. oiler the opportunity lo 
pursue the medical career 
you've wished for while main- 
taining the balance between 
family & job. Nestled on the 
beautilul Pacific Ocean sur- 
rounded by scenic Redwood 
trees, consider leaving Ihe has- 
sles of the big city lar behind to 
join our healthcare team. Enjoy 
the small town feel of a 
Victorian seaport white working 
for a growing S forward thinking 
healthcare system with a vision 
tor the lulu re. Currently, we 
seek the following 
professionals: 

*RNs 
-Cardiac Support 
- - Surgical Nurse 
-Open Heart Nurse 

• Critical Care 

- Clinical Nurse Specialist 

- Charge Nurses 

- ICU.Tel 

•PROF/TECH 

• Radiation Therapist 

-Nuclear Med Tech 

-MRITech 

-CTTech 

• Radiology Tech 

• Sonographer 

We are proud to oiler a compre- 
hensive salary, generous sign 
on bonuses & relocation asst 
Situated in coastal N. California, 
Eureka & its surrounding com 
munities are titled with history S 
mystique. We oiler a climate 
w/out harsh temperatures, easy 
lo access a myriad ol yr-round 
outdoor activities, a reasonable 
cost ol living & an easy-going 
hfestyie. II these amenities 
appeal to you, please send 
resume: 

SL Joseph Health System 

arm: HR Oept.. 

2700 Dolbeer Street 

Eureka, CA 95501 

Fax: (707) 269-3746 

E-mail: vkjer@sje.sljoe.org 

For additional openings, call 

our Jobtine: (707) 269-4243. 

Visit us on the web at 

www.sjhshumboldlcounty. org 

EOE 




Business 

Oppnnunitics 



ATTENTION 

Lose weight & earn ex Ira 

money. Limited lime offer. 

Call today (847) 854-5929. 



ATTENTION: WORK 
FROM HOME! Mali 

Ord*r Business. Need help 
immediately.. $S22+/week PT, 
S100O-$40O07WMk FT. 
Full training. Free booklet. 
www.wellpro vldedfor.com 
(300) 81&-6620 



WORK P/T FROM HOME 

Earn S500-$1 ,000/mo. 

www, m vpc2work .com 

Code 10406 or 

(847) 604-0737. 

WOULD YOU LIKE TO 

LEARN HOW TO 

EARN MONEY 

WITH THE INTERNET? 

130 year old company 

shows you how. 

htlp //www.isoinfo.com 

Access code jd8487. 




Situations Wanted 



WORK WANTED 

BARTENDER FOR HIRE 

EXPERIENCED 

For private parties. 

Help serving/cleaning up. 

(262) 652-8767 

ask tor Judith. 



NAVY LEAGUE LAKE 
COUNTY COUNCIL 
Seeking, members inter- 
ested in supporting the 
Navy and engaging in 
lively service social pro- 
grams. Membership •in- 
cludes on-base Greal 
Lakes access and Sea 
Power magazine. 

Brochure and information 
are available by written re- 
quest from: 

Forgal Gallagher, 2404 
Stallion CL, Grayslake, IL 
60030 or call 

(847)543-1205, 



240 


arildCare 



BEACH PARK UCENSED 

Daycare. 2 positions avail. 
All ages. Meals & snacks 
provided. Variety of fun & 
games. Also, positions open 
between hours of weekends 
and evenings only. Reliable 
inquiries only. Ask for Lisa. 
847-625-8496. 

CARING & LOVING GRAYS- 
LAKE MOM will provide reli- 
able FT/PT childcare in my 
Haryan Farms home. Family 
atmosphere, excellent refer- 
ences, iByrs. experience. 
(847) 543-9232. 

LAKE VILLA UCENSED Day 
Care Home. CPR & First Aid 
Certified. Accepting applica- 
tions for PT/FT care 7:00AM- 
5:00PM M-F. Structured Envi- 
ronment. Fun activities & 
Lots of Lovet Try Us Outl 
Valerie 847-587-0662. 



240 


Child Care 



UCENSED APPUED FOR. 

Openings beginning January 
1, 2001 in my Ingleside 
home. Location is in Tanner- 
on Bay. I have more lo offer 
than lust daycare, with a boy 
of 2 1/2 myself. Many basic 
'lifelong* functions are 
learned, and I will assist in 
teaching your child basic 
skills from colors to counting 
word lormation (vowels, etc.) 
lo more advanced skills and 
motor coordination. Field 
trips (approved by parents) 
.will be taken on occasion, 
as well as, physical activi- 
ties daily in or to provide an 
all around atmosphere bene- 
ficial to your child. Your 
mind will be at ease knowing 
that you have the 'next-best* 
person to yourselves helping 
your child grow-mentally and 
physically. Interview going 
on now. Please call 847-546- 
8021 (this is my husband's 
DJ business phone number, 
please leave me a mes- 
sage). Michelle. 

MUNDELEIN HOME HAS 5 
PT/FT. night care, wkends. 
openings for children ages 2- 
10. Nutritious meats & flexi- 
ble hrs. Fenced-in yard. Low 
cost & after school. 847-837- 
1662. 

RICHMOND EXPERIENCED 
MOM with lots of TLC has 
FT/PT openings. Ref. avail- 
able. (815) 678-0901. 

SUTTON ON THE LAKE 
Mother of 4. looking to pro- 
vide a safe and loving envi- 
ronment for one or two tod- 
dlers, weekdays. Charlotte 
(847) 265-5839. 



301 



Antiques 



ANTIQUE 

CASH 

REGISTERS 

•***Early 1900's**** 

Models 300' s, 400' s 

and 500's. 

Registers have not been 

restored. Will sell one or 

all (or any combination), 

cash and carry ONLY! 

Contact Jim Davis at 

(847)599-0586 

(leave maossogo) 

or e-mail at 

Jjdl 06@prodlgy.not- 



To Place An 
Ad With 



NEWSPAPERS 



Call (847) 223-8161 
or Fax (847} 223-2691 



»*•*** 



4 • t 

I > ■ 






. t 



-„.-^i — -.»-.■— - "_V ^ l l^iH W tf '*- 



-- !■ - -»,--. \ 



mm 



■^B 



B1 6/ Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIEDS 



December 1,2000 






310 


BazaarsA^rafls 




51 54: Adorable rag 
doll, perfect gift for a 
special child, is 15" tall. 
Printed pattern and 
sewing instructions for 
doll and clothes. 




51 18: Adorable early 
American doll creates 
an ideal home accent 
or gift for a special girl. 
Directions, printed pat- 
tern for 21" doll and 
eight piece wardrobe 
included. 



All Patterns are S5.50 each 



Make Checks Payauleto: 

Reader Mail, Dept. #6101 

Box 520. Ludington, Ml 49431 

PltlNT NAME. ADDRESS, Zll*. 



3S 



PATTERN NHM1IHH AND SI/I- 



VISA I, MASTI-HCAHI) 

tpu lijiic T.-11-iC 1-niJiU; A CI[HnlKWI li lie 



314 



UuiUllnu Male 



rials I 



HABITAT RESTORE OPEN 

Tuesdays, 2prn-5pm; Wed- 
nesdays, 9am-noon; Thurs- 
days, 2pm-5pm; Saturdays. 
9am-1pm, Habilal Restore 
will bo closed Dec. 17 
through Jan. 5. 100's of new 
and used items including 
cabinels, sinks, windows, 
hardware, lighting, paint, otc. 
All doors half price. Lorroll 
Business Center, 1 mile 
south of Buckley Road (137) 
on Hwy. 41, North Chicago. 
Proceeds benefit Habitat tor 
Humanity Lake County. Infor- 
mation, (847) 623-1020 week- 
days. 

NEW STEEL BUILDING, 

40x32. Was S7.990. Now 
$3,990. 1-800-292-0111. ■ 



320 



Electronics 
Computers 



DON'T THROW AWAY 
YOUR OLD COMPUTER 
EQUIPMENT. I will come 
and pick it up for FREE. Call 
(847)566-2819. 



328 



Firewood 



FIREWOOD 6 FACE cords of 
nard oak slab wood, great for 
■voodburners and fireplaces, 
$250 delivered. (262) 
657-5041. 




CLEAN OUT THAT 

CLUTTER 

IN YOUR GARAGEI1 

'TIS THE SEASON TO 

MAKE THAT EXTRA $$$ 

FOR THE HOL1DAYSU 

BY HAVING A GARAGE 

SALE. PLACE YOUR 

GARAGE SALE AD IN THE 

11 HOME TOWN PAPERS 

THE GREAT LAKES 

BULLETIN 

& 

THE MARKET JOURNAL 

BY CALLING 

(B47) 223-81 61 EXT. 501 

ASK FOR LISA. 

AFTER YOU'VE HAD YOUR 

BIG SALE, and there is still 
things that [ust did not go.... 
Call us at LAKELAND News- 
papers and run it under Ihe 
"FREE or Giveaways' classi- 
fied column. FREE AOS are 
NO CHARGE) (847) 

223-8161, exl. 140. 



340 



I Imisdiold Goods 

Furniture* 



7 1/2' 3 sect. Chri5tmans 
Tree w/stand. EZ fold-up 
stge. S200 new. Sac. $75. 
847-662-7579. 

BED. HI-GLOSS. WHT. Lam. 
Kg. Custom Pod. w/blt-n nil 
stands. $1,000, Drssr. Oak. 
S250. 7' oak conf, tbl„ staine- 
less ped. S350. DR set oak. 
2lvs. 6 chrs. China & buf- 
fel$950. Br set dbt, oak. 4 
pc. S900. 6 cotem uphol. 
metal kit. chrs. 4 mos. S75. 
ea. Kg. wtr bed w/6 drawer 
base & bkess hdbrd. S200, 2 
pc. sect. navy, contem. 600. 
Exc. cond. 847-821-8729. 

DECORATOR MUST SELL 
BEDROOM SET, 6PC, Mis- 
sion oak, S975. Cherry di- 
ningroom set, 9pc, SI ,795. 
sola, S350. (847) 329-4156. 

CHRISTMAS TREE FOR 
sale. New 7ft. white flock. 
S50. Call after. 6Pm. 847-245- 

4770. 

DINING AND DINETTE 
SETS, assorted desks and as- 
sorted lighi lixtures, grandfa- 
ther clock, armoires and as- 
sorted couches wilh love- 
seats, By owner, (847) 
438-6997. 

DO YOU NEED TO SELL 

THATINEXPENSIVE tTEM 

TO SELL FOR S100 OR 

LESS? GET YOUR AD IN 

THE 

11 HOME TOWN PAPERS 

THE GREAT LAKES 

BULLETIN 

& 

THE MARKET JOURNAL 

FOR ONLY S5 PER WEEK 

BY CALLING 

(B47) 223-8161 

ASK FOR LISA. 

FORMAL DININGROOM SET 
FOR SALE Cherry finish, 
hutch, lable w/6-chairs, good 
condition. Paid $2,500, ask- 
ing $1,250, (847)973-0992. 



B! gp taa 



tm 



Pets picked for Lakeland's Pet of the Week 

appear In most Issues of Lakeland Newspapers, 
The Great Lakes Bulletin, and 
The Market Journal? 

Your pet may be next! 




Send us your 

favorite photo 

and any 

information about 

the pet you 

would like to see 

mentioned to 

Lakeland 

Media, Attn: 

Classified PET 

OF THE WEEK, 

P.O. Box 268, 

Grayslako, 

Illinois 60030. 

Photos will be 

returned if you 

send a S.A.S.E, 

or pick thorn up 

at Lakeland 

Media. All 

information is 

subject to editing 




•-»» ■>"• ' ■ 







y 



/ 






^ 



ynhT^Mandy" - 



340 



Household Goods 
Furniture 



KING SIZE WATERBED, 
oak with drawers, mirror and 
lamps on headboard. Excel- 
lent condition. $3QO/bosl. 
(847)263-1646. 

LARGE DARK WOOD BUNK 
BEDS, sofa, loveseal, arm 
chair. Ball filled playpen w- 
Irampoline. (847) 973-1 8B3. 

LOUNGE CHAIR, VINYL, 
w/motorized seal lift, $200. 
^(847) 526-7106. 

REFRIGERATOR-STOVE, 
TOYS, AND furniture. . 262- 
656-1373 for more informa- 
tion! 

ROSE 9X12 RUG stitched all 
sides. $75.00. 847-244-2711. 

SHARP LOOKING 

BRUNSWICK 

ANTIQUE POCKET 

BILUARD TABLE. 

4-l/2x9ft., 3-pieces 

1-1/2' slate top. Mahogany 

wilh Ivory & Mother ol Pearl 

inlays. S7,500/best 

reasonable offer. 

(847) 662-0943. 

SOFA WHITE ON white. 98". 
Clean. Like new cond. S350. 
847-327-9319. 



HOLIDAY 

STORE WIDE 

FURNITURE SALE 

'3-piece lealher set 

S990. 
♦3-piece 100% Italian 

• Lealher sola/tovescal and 

chair, $1,290, 

•Deluxe 6-piece Bedroom 

Set. $290. 

•Black velvet sectional, 

$390. 

•Italian lacquer bedroom set, 

S790. 

* Italian mahogany bedroom 

set $790. 
•3-piece sofa, loveseal & 
chair w/cocktail table set 

& lamps, $595 

'Queen pillow lop mattress 

set, deluxe $240. 

• King size mattress set, 

deluxe, S250. 

Twin mattress set, 

$lrom $75. 

Full size mattress set 

from $125. 

Queen pillow lop mattress 

set, $240. 

'Deluxe queen mattress set, 

$140. 
•7-piece cherry dininigroom 

set, S450. 
'Benchcrnlt Italian leather 
sectional, with 2-recliners 

and sleeper. $1,895. 

•Italian lealher sofa sleeper, 

$695. 

•Italian Leather green 

sectional, $1,495. 
'Bone pearlizod lealher 
sectional, by Benchcralt, 

$1 ,795. 

•Italian Imported lOpieco 

mahogany diningroom set, 

includes 6-chairs, lable and 

crystal cut china 

was $4,500. now $1 ,795. 

•Seven piece diningroom sol 

5295, 

FACTORY CLOSE OUTS: 

•Twin size mattress sol, S75, 

•Full size $125. 

•Queen 4-piece complete 

bedding set, includes frame 

& headboard, £250. 

•Butcher block diningroom 

sot $100. 

'Black molal futon with 

mattress, $100. 

'3-piece cocklail table scl, 

$79.95 
•Six piece childrens com- 
plete bedroom set, includes 
computer desk, $290/set. 
Imported rugs, art, statues, 

and much more. 

ONCE IN A LIFETIME SALE. 

COME IN CHECK OUT OUR 

WHOLESALE PRICES. 

Colobrating our 

491h. Yoar. 

Hope to soo you soon. 

WHOLESALE TO YOU 

BEST PRICES 

SHELDON CORD 

PRODUCTS 

2201 W. Dovon, Chicago. 

Open 7 days 

We carry Thousands ol 

name brand furniture, ilems, 

at super low prices. 
Come in and chock our pric- 
es. 
(773) 973-7070. 
Visit our website 
www.sheldoncord.com 






Lakeland's Classified 
Deadline is 

10:00 A.M. Wednesday 

Calk (847) 223-81 61 or 
Fax:(847)223-2691 



344 


Jewelry 



STUNNING LADIES WED- 
DING RING, round .81 carat 
diamond setting wilh 6 round 
and 6 baguette diamonds. 
Appraised at $9,500, asking 
$4,700/best. Call Melissa 
(847) 372-4042. 




ATTENTION COLLECTORS 

BARBIES FOR SALE 

Never opened! 

Collector issues, 

1st. Editions or Limited 

Editions; Holiday/winter 

dolls. Able to fax list. . 

Call (847) 587-9183 

evenings or leave mossago. 

Will sell in groups or types. 

CHARITY CARS - Donate 
your vehicle, As seen on 
Oprahl Tax-deductible, tree 
tow. We provide donated ve- 
hicles lo struggling families. 
800-442-4451. www.charily- 
cars.ORG (SCA Network). 

DO YOU NEED TO SELL 

THAT INEXPENSIVE ITEM 

FOR $100 OR LESS. 

GET YOUR AD IN THE 

11 HOME TOWN PAPERS 

THE 

GREAT LAKES 

BULLETIN 

& 

THE MARKET JOURNAL 

FOR ONLY S5 PER WEEK 

BY CALUNG 

(847) 223-8161 

EXT 501 
ASK FOR LISA. 

DOG KENNEL 10'X10\ 
$150. Small Toro snowblow- 
er. $250. (815)675-2675. 

JUMBO HANDOUTS1 FROM 

wealthy families unloading 
millions of dollars lo help 
minimize their taxos. Write 
immediately: Triumph, 4542 
East Tropicana Ave,, W207, 
Las Vegas, NV 89121. (SCA 
Network), 

LOSE 10LBS. IN 10 DAYS. 
■FAT PREDATOR CAP- 
SULES* Extremely power- 
fulllllt Takes appetite, de- 
letes body tat, gives high en- 
ergy. Results in 2-5 days. 1- 
B77-48-NO-FAT. 
www.fatprodo1or.cqm 
(SCA Nolwork). 

MODEL SHIPS ALL wood 
construction, lug boats, 

schooners, sailboats, 3B"- 
60", S200-S475. (262) 
249-9695. 

MOTIVATIONAL CAS- 

SETTES, oxcellonl condition. 
Over $500 value. Best oiler. 
(847) 516-3425. 



SONY KV32XBR97S XBR2 

TV $650. Klipsch Quintets 
whilo satellite surround sys- 
tem wilh KSW10 subwoofer, 
$500. Klipsch KG 2.5 oak (2 
pair) wilh Polk CS3509 cen- 
lor channel (greal sound sys- 
lorn), S600. Sony SLVR1000 
SVHS editing VCR, $500. 
Sony DCRVX1000 DV in- 
dustrial camcorder with 
hardshell case and 3 batter- 
ies, $1,850. Sony MZR port- 
able minidisc player wilh 
noise canceling head- 
phones, $250. zzpioneer 
PDR555rw CD recorder, 
$250. John (847) 867-6406. 0- 
rnail: JLyleCDH@aol,com 



STAINLESS STEEL TABLE 

w/wheels, 2'x2'. Old Foosball 
table Toast well bun warm- 
er, N.S.F. 2-door sandwich re- 
frigerator, N.S.F. Small 
spreader, $10. Car top carri- 
er, $25. Rolling Stones Sign 
(poster), Budwoiser. Assort- 
ed garden towels. Assorted 
tumbling equipment: Turn- 
able drum, ultra dome, 
springboard, crash mat, vault 
box (pro-school), balance 
beam, 2-mats, 5x10. Call 
Linda or Rich (647) 336-1538. 

TARGET 11 MILLION 
HOMES WITH YOUR AD Ad- 
venise your product or serv- 
ice to 1 mllion households in 
North America's best sub- 
urbs by placing your classi- 
fied ad in noarly 800 subur- 
ban newspapers just like 
this one. Only $895 for 1 25- 
word ad, One phone call, one 
invoice, one payment. Call 
the Suburban Classified Ad- 
vertising Network al 312-644- 
6610x36391 



WHITE LAB JACKETS, 
$1.00. Manual typewriter, 
$5.00. (847) 566-0990. 



350 


Miscellaneous 



WISCONSIN DELLS WEEK 
INVESTMENT. Fantom Cy- 
clonic vacuum, 1yr. old, 
$300. 11 amp, Milwaukee 
drill with bits to 2'. Milwau-, 
kee 9* grinder, chop saw, 
sharpening equipment. (262) 
763-1942. 



354 



Medial liqulp 
.Supplies 



DIABETICS1 TESTING SUP- 
PLIES at no cost if you have 
MEDICARE/Insurance. New 
meters, syringes & insulin if 
you qualify+eroclile dysfunc- 
tion pumps. 800-815-1577 
No HMO's. (SCA Network). 

ELECTRIC WHEELCHAIR, 
BRAND now Jazzi. Metallic 
bluo, gray volour soat, head- 
lights, faUllghts, horn and 
storage aroo In back. Origi- 
nally $7,000, asking 
55,000,'bcsl. (262) 245-9005. 

ELECTRIC WHEELCHAIR, 
BRAND new Jazzt. Metallic 
blue, gray volour soat, head- 
lights, tallllghts, horn and 
storage area in back. Origi- 
nally $7,000, asking 
S5,000/bost. (262) 245-9005. 

HOSPITAL BED, ELECTRIC, 
$225. Heallhwalker (glider), 
$130. Golds Gym Home 
Trainer (lloxbands), S60. Ne- 
gotiable. (262) 537-4539. 




ELECTRIC GUITAR Poavoy 
Predator Int. Black w/white 
pick board, 1 volume, 2 tone 
switches, 3 pick-ups, wham- 
my bar. strap & Peavey gig 
bag. Mint condilion. Asking 
$250. (847) 838-6296. 



360 



Pets & Supplies 



CAT PLAYPEN 

36.5x24.5x48.5, some cus- 
tomizing done, $100. (847) 
223-4047. 

DOBERMAN PUPPIES, 

AKC, M/F, tails, dewclaws. 
dowormed. Beautiful, 

healthy. Great Holiday gift. 
Must see. $450. (847) 
356-0767. 

GERMAN SHEPHERDS, 
AKC, Champion bloodlines, 
some longhaired, current 
shots, vet checked, 10/wks. 
and 6/mo„ already x-rayed, 
$500 & up. (262)878-1550. 

GORDON SETTER PUPPIES 
FOR SALE, great lamily pot 
and hunting dog. (262) 
895-7376. 

HUSKY PUPS, 6/MO. fe- 
male/malo, friendly, great 
with kids. Make oiler. (847) 
670-1923. 



I'M A 9/WEEK OLD GOLDEN 
RETRIEVER, nood a homo, 
AKC Rogtstorod, had my 
1st. Vot Chock-up, $350. 
(262) 279-6370 alter 4pm. 



TO GOOD HOME 3yr. old 
spayed black cat, friendly, 
comes with covered liter 
box. Looking for good home. 
(847) 973-1883. 



TO GOOD HOME Beautiful 
black female boagle/spaniel 
mix. Spayed, medium size 
dog, great w/kids. Very obe- 
dient. Comes w/cage. (847) 
263-1646. 



368 



Tools & 
Machinery 



MAC TOOL BOX Macslmizer 
Class 2, super station, 
$2,850. (262) 279-9889. 



370 



Warned To liny 



Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or 
Paris, Also JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC BOXES, Nlckolo- 
doon and Coko Machines. 
Paying CASHI Call 
(630)985-2742. 



WANTED TO BUY 1-10 
acres near IHAVisc. border, to 
build storage building. Ask for 
Jared (414) 862-2517. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



ALL INCLUSIVE 

Lake Villa 
New Construction 

Subdivision, 

CUSTOM HOMES 

■ *4-bedrooms 

'9ft. basements 

•1/4 acre 

•Central air 

•Low $200's. 

FREE FIREPLACE 

wilh purchase before 2001. 

(847)675-7511. 

ANTIOCII, BY OWNER 3BR 
w/walk-in closets, 1-1/2 DA, 
Hillside Ranch. 150x300 lot, 
park like yard, walk to fish- 
ing & swimming, eat-in kit, 
w/pantry, Ig. room sizes. 
Monthly gas & heat com- 
blriL-d $80. "99 (axes $2,100. 
(847) 030-9552. 

BASSETT, WISC, VERY se- 
cluded ranch, fireplace, 
deck, 3-bd., 2-1/2 ba., at- 
tached garage,, 4-wooded 
acres, Just N. of Fox Lake, 
$289K. (262) 537-3371. 

KENOSHA, WISC. SMI. N of 
ILL. border, 3 acres, 
6000sq.ft. newer commercial 
bldg. w/shop & showroom. In- 
cludes 2700sq.fl. colonial 
4bd. home, 30'x60' pole barn 
& more. $695,000. See de- 
tails & picture 

www.pfeilfersales.net 
(262) 857-2279. 

BURLINGTON TOWN- 

HOUSE 2-UNITS at 

l,850sq.tt. each. 3-bedrooms, 
2.5 baths, 2-car attached ga- 
rages, private wooded rear 
yard, will sell one or both. 
$112,000/ea. (414) 

763-6365. 

EAST SIDE ZION 3-bd., 2-full 
ba., corner lot, 2-1/2 car gar., 
bsmt., fenced yard, C/A and 
heal, enclosed porch. Near 
bike trail & Lake Michigan, 
$109,000. (847) 731-7113. 

FOX LAKE FOR SALE BY 
OWNER, hillside ranch with 
full finished walk-out base- 
ment, 3-bedroom, 2-baths, 
skylight, fireplace, $132,000. 
(847) 587-2629. 

186 FORREST AVE. 
BLOCK FROM FOX LAKE 
MINEOLA BAY AREA. 
NEWER 4-bedroom, 2-1/2 
baih, 26x11 master with balco- 
ny. New central air. $165,900. 
(847)587-1200. 

FOX LAKE MUST see lo ap- 
preciate! Lovely 3 bdrm. end 
unit. LR & separate DR 
w/vltd. clgs. Mstr. suite, walk- 
In closet. Kitchen w/sunny 
breakfast area w/access to 
deck. Full finished walk-out 
basement w/FP & full bath. 
Light & airy throughout, Cus- 
tom drapes. $179,900. Call 
847-973-1499. 



Gov't Foreclosures 
Sale 

Waukogan, Zion.Round Lako, 

McHonry & othef areas. 

From $52,000 & upl 

Low down'irutke otter! 

Wostorn Roalty 

1-630-495-6100 



GOVT FORECLOSED 

HOMES 

As low as Sl99/mol 

Gov't & Bank Repos 

4% downl 

O.K. Credit! 

For listings & pyrin, details 

1-800-501-1777 

exl. 9203. 



GRAYSLAKE PRETTY CO- 
LONIAL Stylo Home, 
S219.0O0. Finished base- 
ment w/grealroom, den, wet 
bar, lull bath, perfect for en- 
tertaining. Deck, shed & 
playsot in backyard. Neutral 
colors & carpet. Call Jim & 
Susan Starwall, RE/MAX 
Showcase (847) 360-3311 
x214. 



GRAYSLAKE. 5164,900. NO 
association fees! Grayslako 
lownhome backs to park & 
nature area. Finished walk- 
out basement. Large room 
sizes. Greal deck. Call Jim 
& Susan Starwall, RE/MAX 
Showcase (847) 360-3311 
x214. 



GRAYSLAKE, OPEN QUAD 

Level Floor Plan, $219,800. 
Features Include vaulted 
ceilings, ceramic floors. 
brick familyroom fireplace, 3 
Her deck and inground sprin- 
kler system. Many upgrades. 
Call Jim & Susan Starwall, 
REMAX Showcase (847) 
360^3311 x214. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



GRAYSLAKE/WILDWOOD 4- 
BEDROOM RANCH on dou- 
ble lot with fabulous lake- 
view. Backs to park. Water 
rights: Large gourmet kitch- 
en, deck, 2-tireplaces, base- 
ment. $275,000. (800) 383- 
5721 exl. 123, £815) 
382-8079. 

GURNEE 2-STORY ALL 
brick and stucco. 2-car at- 
tached garage, 5-bedrooms, 
4-baths, familyroom, formal di- 
ningroom, oak staircase and 
trim, 2 masonry fireplaces, 
laundryroom, full basement. 
Very attractive home in nice lo- 
cation. $335,000. (847) 
623-2870. 

GURNEE 4BR/2BA BRICK 
house. Many upgrades & ex- 
tras. Lrg. well landscpd lot. 
By owner. 847-662-0727 or 
847-746-1362. 

GURNEE WINCHESTER ES- 
TATES 4 lrg. bdrm,. 21/2 
balhs. 2-story home. 2.800 
sq, ft., lrg deck. Just reduced 
$255,000. Call for appt. 647- 
855-8809. 

tNGLESIDE BY OWNER, 3- 
bd., 3-ba., 2-1/2 car gar., .75 
acros woodod hillside home. 
Qulot, secluded neighbor- 
hood, wator rights, codar 
dock second floor, sovoral 
now updates, 2-stono fire- 
places, C/A. Big Hollow 
School Dlst. $179,900. NO 
REALTORS. (847) 973-0992. 

INGROUND POOL FOR sale 
by owner. 3 bdrm. Ranch. 
Full finished basement, large 
deck, lots of storage, ap- 
pliances included. Qulel 
neighborhood, close lo train. 
Must seel $159,000. 815-344- 
6367. 

KENOSHA Wl 7317 31st 
Ave. FSBO. 3 BR/1 1/2 BA. 
Please call for all details. 
$114,900,262-654-3300. 

KENOSHA. Wl- For Sate By 
Owner. 3 BR ranch. 2 BA. fin. 
bsml w/ bet bar, C/A, 2.5 car 
gar., only 10 min. from 1-94, 
$119,900. (262) 653-8269 

KENOSHA, Wl. 1732 10TH 
AVE. Bet. Parkside ~~^ 
Carthage. 'N'ewly decorated 3 
bdrm., 2.5 car garage, full 
bsmt., w/partial rec. rm. 
Move-In cond. $123,000. 262- 
551-0257. 

KENOSHA. FOREST PARK 
School District. 3 bdrm. 
Ranch. Many amenities. 
Open House Sun. 12-2. 4815 
68th SI., 53142. By appl. 262- 
634-5411. 

LAKE GENEVA IMMACU- 
LATE NEWER home, many 
extra touches, cathedral ceil- 
ings, fireplace, skylight, 
hardwood floors, whirlpool 
tub. Already reduced price. 
$145,000. Must sell, make 
offer. Days (262) 248-2414, 
evenings (262) 279-3112. 

LAKE VILLA & GRAYS- 
LAKE SCHOOLS. $174,900. 
Private backyard backs to 
wooded preserve. Extensive 
landscaping. Floor to ceiling 
flagstone fireplace. Hard- 
wood kitchen floor. Call Jim 
& Susan Starwalt. RE/MAX 
Showcase (847) 360-3311 
X214. 

LAKE VILLA MODERN home 
w/orig. barn wall in FR. 
3BR/1.58A, Altached ga- 
rage. LR w/lrg. picture wind- 
ow. Lrg. fenced yard, deck. 
Family groally blessed while 
living here. $1"48,000. 847- 
356-7608. 

MCHENRY COUNTY 

2.800SQ.FT., 2-story wilh full 
basement, on 4.37 park like 
acres with 60 plus evergreen 
trees, near horse trails. 4- 
bedrooms with 3-1/2 baths, 2- 
fireplaces, 2-1/2 car garage, 
pool. Bull Valley area. 
$330,000. Immediate occu- 
pancy. (815) 455-3003, cell 
(321)432-6833. 

MUNDELEIN. FSBO. 6MO. 
old homo in center of town. 
Walk to train and shopping. 
2-story, 4br/2 1/2 ba. Full 
bsml.. 2-car atlached garage. 
S239.990. Sl.OOO/findors foe. 
School dist. 75/120. Lv 
msg. 847-949-5192. 



. »■» »• t« ««. ** ** * 



VINTAGE BEAUTY, 

GREAT Waukogan neighbor- 
hood. 3-bedrooms, hardwood 
floors and trim, fireplace, cen- 
tral air, $134,900. (847) 
662-5942. ... 



1HH 



,2000 



or Sale 



rOOD4- 

on dou- 
js lake- 
t. Water 
at kitch- 
s, bas'e- 
30) 383- 
(815) 



[Y ALL 

2-car at- 
edrooms, 
forma! di- 
;ase and 
replaces, 
asement. 
in nice to- 
- (847) 



\ BRICK 

jes & ox- 
Jscpd lot. 
J-0727 or 



STEH ES- 
rm.. 21/2 
ne. 2,800 
st reduced 
appt. 847- 



V7NER, 3- 
lr gar., .75 
sldo homo, 
neighbor- 
its, codar 
)T, sovorol 
stono firo- 
g Hollow 
9,900. NO 
973-0992. 

_ FOR sale 
m. Ranch, 
ment, large 
orage, ap- 
ed. Quiet 
so to train. 
)0. 815-344- 



7317 31 St 

R/1 1/2 BA. 
all details. 
4-3300. 

For Sale By 
ch, 2 BA. fin. 
C/A, 2.5 car 
a from 1-94. 

553-8269 

1732 19TH 

:>arkslde~£ 
■ decorated 3 
garage, full 
il rec. rm. 
123,000. 262- 



REST PARK 
t. 3 bdrm. 

amenities. 
in. 12-2. 4815 
By appt. 262- 

'A IMMACU- 
home. many 
cathedral ceil- 
:e. skylight, 
irs, whirlpool 
educed price, 
st sell, make 
52) 248-2414. 
279-3112. 



. & GRAYS- 

LS, SI 74,900. 
ard backs to 
rve. Extensive 
loor to ceiling 
»piaco. Hard- 
floor. Call Jim 
Arall, RE/MAX 
47) 360-3311 



MODERN homo 
wall in FR, 
Attached cja- 
], picture wind- 
ed yard, deck, 
■ blessed while 
> 148. 000, 847- 



COUNTY 
2-story with full 

4.37 park like 

plus evergreen 
lorse traits. 4- 
i 3-1/2 baths, 2- 
1/2 car garage, 

Valley area. 
imediate occu- 

455-3003, cell 
13. 

. FSBO. 6MO. 
center of town. 
i and shopping, 
2 1/2 ba. Full 
attached garage, 
,000/finders fee, 
. 75/120. Lv. 
J-5192, 



BEAUTY, 

ikegan neighbor- 
ooms, hardwood 
m, fireplace, cen- 
134,900. (847) 



December 1, 2000 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Lakeland Newspapers / B1 7 



500 



Homes For Sale 



NORTH CHICAGO CLOSE to 
Naval Base, easy access to 
41 & expressway. 3-bd., 3- 
ba., marble fireplace, Pergo 
floors, |n kitchen w/ceiling 
fans, linishod basement 
w/wetbar, 2-1/2 car gar. 
w/storago; toft, vaulted ceil- 
ings w/skylighls, Ig. yard 
w/kennel. Asking $170,000. 
Call Mike (847) 817-0166. 

NORTH CHICAGO CLOSE to 
Naval Base, 3-bd., 1-ba„ 2- 
car gar., full bsmt. Cheaper 
than renting, $79,900. (847) 
689-9690. 

HOME FOR SALE BY 
OWNER Impressive 3-bed- 
room, 2.5 bath attached 
house, backs to park, with 
ball court and playground. 
Cathedral ceilings in living- 
room, master bedroom and 
master bath. 1, 500sq.lt., eat- 
in kitchen with pantry, 2-car 
attached garage, plenty of 
storage Open, bright at- 
mosphere. Built In 1993. Pro- 
fessionally landscaped yard 
with large deck. Country 
Walk Subd.. 2234 Sunrise, 
Round Lake Beach, Lake Vil- 
la/Grant Schools. $139,900. 
No association fees. (647) 
265-9630. 

PLEASANT PRAIRIE, WI. 
OPEN HOUSE- Dec. 2 & 3, 
I pin • 4pm. 41I7-I22nd Si. 
[fust off letvls Aw, (39th Atv 
in Kenosha). Tri -level home 
minutes from II. stiilclinc. 
New furnace, nir cond, & 
roof in yr 21)00. |jiru,c fk'ld- 
sHme frplc in Lit; wood stove 
in I'll. Oak cabinets & new 
Hour in kit. 2-1/2 car jfa'r, 
12x20 stor'ngu shrd. Nicely 
l:i nd scaped. Main I. Tree ex- 
terior. Slji 1,5)00. Call after 
4:30pm. (262) 694-3334 

PROFESSIONALLY RENO- 
VATED 4-BEDROOM, 2-balh 
home. Located on Boone 
Creek and within walking dis- 
tance ol McHenry, New eve- 
rything throughout (call for 
complete details and free 
mortgage pre-approval) 0% 
down financing available. 
This home is In mint condi- 
tion, $163,000. (815) 
^479-1985. 

RAISED RANCH * W/FIN- 
ISHED bsmt. & attached 2- 
car garage. 2 Ig. br. w/walk-in 
closets, possible 3rd br. in 
bsmt,, 1 1/2 ba„ vltd. clg„ 
open LR, kitchen. Big Hollow 
School Oistrict. 5140,000. 
Lv. Msg, 847-587-6943. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 2-br. 
Cape Cod, all appliances 
stay. A/C, $71,900. (847) 
546-6538. 

ROUND LAKE PARK 
3-bedroom, 1-balh 

Capo Cod, w/attached 
buildablo lot, all new 

appliances. A/C. heat, 

double fonced yards. 

House S99.995, 

w/lot $114,995. 

NO AGENTS) 

(815)578-0738, 

ROUND LAKE PARK. Must 
sell. Huge great room w/ex- 
posed beamed clg.. nicely 
updated kitchen, wood flrg.. 
3 br., healed garage, double 
lot, fully-fenced, Irg, deck. 
$119,900,847-270-9165, 

ROUND LAKE. 3 

bdrm/2bath raised ranch. 
Quiet neighborhood. Near 134 
Train Station. 2-car garage. 
Fenced yard, 500sq.ft. deck. 
Many upgrades. $125,000. 
847-740-3148. 

KENOSHA G-BEDROOM 
HOME. 2800sq.lt., 4-balhs, 2- 
car garage, 3-parking 
spaces, heated pool, cathe- 
dral ceilings, $150,000. Call 
tor details. (262) 654-7392. or 
(946) 365-3907. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



SPRING GROVE ON 
CHANNEL, nice 1 -bedroom 
collage with fireplace, also 
large fenced-in backyard, plus 
boat dock, owner ! financing, 
$89,900. 20% down, 
$750/monlh. (847) 497-3256, 
(847) 988-2078, 

SUBMIT YOUR LAKELAND 
CLASSIFIED ADS ON THE 
INTERNET! 
Visit http://www.lpnews.com/ 
to place your ads conven- 
iently, Ads appear on the In- 
ternet, in all Lakeland Pa- 
pers.., The Great Lakes Bul- 
letin and The Market Journal 
for only $20.50 for 4 lines 
(approximately 16 words), 
then -60c each additional 
line. 

THREE BEDROOM TRt-LEV- 
EL, 2-1/2 baths. 2-car ga- 
rago, fireplace, central air, 
new Pergo flooring. Berber 
carpeting, fenced yard, 
screened porch. . pool, deck, 
patio, beautifully land- 
scaped, $194,900. (847) 
356-3614. 

THREE BEDROOM, FULL 
basement, heated garage, 
595K. priced below appraised 
value. Excellent schools. 
Large bedrooms with hard- 
wood floors, partially finished 
basement. 100x140 lot. 5- 
minutes from Richmond. (262) 
279-1033. 

TREVOR, Wl. N. of Antioch. 
2bdrm. Low mainl. Low tax- 
es. 2 lots. Lake rights, 1/4 
mile. Asking 596.000. 262- 
862-6695. 

TWIN LAKES, WISC. 3 bd., 
2-1/2 ba., custom brand new 
2300+ sq.ft. home. 5199.900. 
262-552-7640. 262-705- 
3302. 

WADSWORTH 2-BD. TOWN- 
HOUSE + loft. 1-1/2 baths, 
finished basement, 2-car ga- 
rage, neutral decor, Gurnee 
schools, move-in condition, 
$144,900. (847) 913-1600 
PLATINUM REALTY. 

WADSWORTH. GOLF 

COURSE. Townhouso w/Iolt. 
2763 N. Augusta Dr. Fabu- 
lous view. 2br/1 1/2 ba. Eat- 
in -kitchen. Upgrades galorel 
$165,000,847-599-1599. 




FOX LAKE 1BR Waterfront. 
Near train station. 5700/mo., 
plus utilities & security. 
Also, Commercial 2.200 sq. 
ft., with 2BR on Deep Lake 
Rd. Lake Villa. 51,600/mo., 
plus sec. Call Moon 847*223- 
0993. 

GURNEE NEWER 4-BO. co- 
lonial, 2-1/2 ba., familyroom, 
full basement, purchase op- 
lion. Available 1/01. 

S2,000/mo. (647) 634-8311. 

MUNDELEIN HOME 4-BD. 
ranch, 1-ba., appliances in- 
cluded, 2-1/2 car gar., great 
location, $l,325/mo. Ref, & 
sec. dep. required. (847) 
949-1303. 



MUNDELEIN. 4BR/3BA. 
BRICK Ranch, plus in-law ar- 
rangements. Exc. Cond. 
Must seel Reduced-Asking 
5203,000.847-566-1816. 



OLD MILL CREEK 3-bd.. 1- 
ba. brick ranch, fireplace, 
basement, garage. Built in 
oven, slovo & refrigerator fur- 
nished, large secluded lot. 
Close to shopping, Millburn 
Grade & Warren H.S. Tenant 
pays utilities, $t,100/mo., 
dep. & credit check req. 
Availablo 12/1. " Contact 
Cathy (847) 244-5330. 



504 



Homes For Rent 



SALEM, WISC. 8321 2491h 
Ave, 2-bedroom lower, 
$570/mo. No pets. (262) 
843-3816 www.MoreAdin- 
fo.com/ad/900003 

THREE BEDROOM LAKE- 
FRONT home, on Cross 
Lake, gri. views, nice condi- 
tion. Fishing, swimming & 
boating allowed. Appliances, 
landscaping, snowplowing, 
water & sewer included for 
$850/mo. (262) 843-2460, 
(847) 634-3448. 

WHY ARE YOU RENTING? 
Mortgage payments will, be 
less than your rent payment. 
Everybody gets a home. No 
down payment home loans 
available. No costs consulta- 
tion. Call Tom Ischkum. 847- 
605-8244x177. 



514 



Condos 
Townliornes 



6215-17 72ND ST. Side by 
Side. Townhouse. 2 bdrm. 1 
bath. Large fenced-in yard. 
Attached garages. FP, owner 
occupied. 4 yrs. Si 56.500, 
262-694-4322. 

DOOR COUNTY CONDO 
LANDMARK RESORT-EGG 
HARBOR 2-bd., 2-ba., fur- 
nished, I/O pool, litness cen- 
ter. Anxious to sell. 
St 22,900. (847) 540-0058 
evenings. 

GRAYSLAKE BY OWNER. 
Ouiet spacious townhome 
w/view. End unit, bay wind- 
ow. FP. 2br/21/2ba, loft, 
bsmt/poss. 3rd rm. conv., 2- 
car garage, window treat- 
ments & appliances incl. 
Asking $145,000. 847-231- 
4570. 

GRAYSLAKE TOWNHOME 
For Sale. Cambridge Oak- 
wood twnhme, 4 yrs new. 2 
BR + loft, cathedral ceils, eat- 
in kitchen, spacious LR & 
DR, fin. lower level, "oak trim 

lies. 1-1/2BA. all appls in- 
cluded, 2 car garage. Beaut. 
Carlton model on a premium 
wooded lot. Situated in a sin- 
gle family neighborhd ol 
$300,000+ homes, Maint. 
free living & meticulous 
cond. *5158,900\ 

(047)412-0-101 or 
(B47) 548-1336 

GURNEE 2-BR., 2-BA. fp., 
new appls., cptg., firs., all. 
gar., Indry rm, cathedral ceil- 
ings. $114,900. (847) 

263-6313. 

i 

GURNEE HEATHER RIDGE, 
920 Vose, 1-br,, now ap- 
pliances & decor. S72.500. 
(352) 728-2835, (847) 
623-2380. 

KENOSHA, Wl 22ND Ave. 
Duplex. Fully remodeled. 
S135.000. 262-694-6991 Or 
262-694-3543. 

LIBERTWILLE LUXURIOUS 
TOWNHOUSE, beautiful lo- 
cation, against woods, 2-bed- 
room, 2-1/2 bath, loft, vaulted 
ceiling, skylights, and great 
upgrades, 5179,900. (847) 
549-6860. 

TOWNHOUSE FOR SALE 

BY OWNER, 3-bedrooms, 2- 
balhs, Waukegan address, 
Gurnee schools. No garage. 
Includes washer, dryer, built- 
in dishwasher. Needs new 
air conditioning. Sold as is. 
$84,500. Call Diane (647) 
623-9806. 

WISCONSIN 1-BEDROOM 
CONDO. Furnished with out- 
standing view ol Lake Gene- 
va. Seller very motivated. 
Pool, low association & tax- 
os, reduced to $69,000. Pets 
welcome. (630) 293-5424. 



DEEP LAKE HERMITAGE 

NOW LEASING 

Wc now have spacious I & 2 BEDROOM apartments available, as 
well as LAKE VI EW units. Enjoy the serenity of living on the lake. 
Our beautifully LANDSCAPED complex offers man)' ammenitics. 

Call now for information on_your new home! 

847.356.2002 

Ask about our other .locations. 



518 


Mobile Homes 



MOBILE HOME 14X70 
VERY NICE. MUST SEE1 

Reduced to sell) Bottom dol- 
lar $12,000. Beach Park. 
(847) 244-9084, find info, at 
www.buyahog.com 

MANUFACTURED HOME 
24X48, $27,000. Gurnee 
School District. 3-bedroom, 2- 
fuil baths, livingroom. with 
cathedral ceilings, woodburn- 
ing fireplace, 10x12 shed 
and deck, carport. (847) 
623-0271. 

MOBILE HOME 16X76 Sky- 
line, Forest Brook Supreme, 
3-bedrooms, 2-baths, Jacuzzi 
tub, lots of upgrades, extra 
clean. Must be moved. 
$35,000/best. (815) 

334-820^ 

MOBILE HOME 12X48, 
newly decorated, stored in Elk- 
horn, Wise. Must sell. 
$3,750/best. (708) 453-5946. 

MOBILE HOME 14X70, 3- 
bedrooms, • 1-1/2 baths, 3 
year old furnace and central 
air, 2 year old water healer, 
new carpet, asking $16,500. 
(262) 697-8241. 

MOBILE HOME UPDATED 

2-bedroom, 1-1/2 bath, senior 
park, low lot rent, $11,900. 
(847) 338-5539. 

MOTOR HOME 1992 Hornet. 
27ft. long, low mileage, (262) 
694-2543.. 

PINE ISLAND, FLORIDA 
(Cape Coral-Fort Meyers). 
12x40 Mobile home, adult 
park, with pool, carport and 
slorago shed. Good neigh- 
bors. Immediate possession. 
Furnished, move-in condi- 
tion. Good fishing. Price 
$11,500,(262)878-1397. 

UNION GROVE 1972 Rollo- 
home 14x70 with a 12x16 ad- 
dition, 3-bedrooms, covered 
deck. 2 sheds, includes ap- 
pliances. Asking 527,000/best. 
(414)878-2726. 

WAUCONDA 
1989 2-bedroom, 1-balh, 

$8i900. 
1996 2-bedroom. 1-bath. 

$13,900. 

Office trailer, $4,000. 

Will deliver within 

50 mile radius. 

(847) 526-5000 

leave message. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 
WALK TO EVERYTHING Lo- 
cated in an over 
55 community. 
1968 2-bedroom. 
1-bath, with shed, 

535,900. 

1988 2-bedroom, 

1-1/2 bath with shed, 

$39,900. 

19B9 2-bedroom. 1-bath 

w/room addition & shed. 

$49,900. 

1987 2-bedroom. 1-balh 
w/carporl, deck & shed. 

$37,500. 

1995 2-bedroom, 1-1/2 bath. 

with carport and shed. 

$52,500. 

1988 3-bedroom, 2-bath 
with large carport and shed, 

554,500. 

1995 2-bodroom, 1-1/2 bath 

with carport, garage 

and shed, 

$58,500, 

(847) 526-5000 

leave message. 



520 



Apartments 
For Ri-m 



GURNEE/WAUKEGAN 

NORTH SHORE 

APARTMENTS 

At Affordable Prices. 

Spacious. 

Luxury Living. 

Elevators. 

On Site Staff. 

Good Location. 

Easy to Toll Roads. 

IMPERIAL TOWER/MANOR. 

(847) 244-9222. 



520 



Apartments 
For Rent 



ISLAND LAKE, NICE 2-bd„ 1- 
ba. apt., includes heat, 
$750/mo + sec. & ref. (847) 
526-4435. 

LAKEVIEW TERRACE 

APARTMENTS LAKE VIL- 
LA, Large 1 & 2 bedrooms, 
$670-$785/month. Heat, wa- 
ter, air included. (847) 
356-5474. 

ZION 1-BEDROOM FUR- 
NISHED, heat included, 
quiet area, non-smokers pre- 
ferred, $S25/mo + dep. (847) 
746-0708. 



534 



Business Property 
For Sale 



CENTRAL ILLUNOiS. 

Fast Food Dairy Queen 
Brazier. Hi traffic, full serv- 
ice, turnkey. $589k, Team 
Guaze, Coldwdt Banker 
Devonshire Realty 
217-378-7400; 
btM ty@MeamKauze.com 



ROUND LAKE- BILLIARD 
ROOM Established 13yrs., 
retiring, 12 tables. Days 
(847) 543-1238, evenings 
(847) 740-0046. 



VIRGINIA- 
For Sale by Owner. 
Plumbing-HVAC comm'l/in- 
dustrial/resid'l. 2500sf offc 
& 7500sf duct fabricating 
shop. Exc loc serving Rich- 
mond, VA. On-going gov't 
contracts doing 3 Mil/yr, but 
limited only to manager's 
ability. MUCH WARMER 
weather than Chgo! Email 
obarber ©crosslink. net or 
eves: 804-758-5500/804 
370-5555 



WAUKEGAN 
LAUNDROMAT 

Well established location 
with off street parking for 35 
vehicles. 36 washers, 23 
dryers. Attractive free-stand- 
ing brick building on major 
street. Equipment profes- 
sionally maintained. Excel- 
lent cash How. Annual gross 
$125,000. Asking S85.000. 
Contact Dale Glllmorc al 
(847)265-7752 



538 



Business Property 
Fur Rent 



260OSQ.FT. COMMERCIAL 
BUILDING FOR RENT OR 
FOR SALE in Fox Lake area, 
across from Metra Train Sta- 
tion. Zoned for automotive. 
$1.350/mo. (847) 587-0131 
7:30am -4:30pm. 



LANDSCAPE 
CONTRACTOR 

2000 Sq. Ft. Pole Bam 

plus acreage 

lor growing product 

in 

Richmond. 

- Negotiable. . 

Land 
Management 

815-678-4334 



WAUCONDA 

(Central Business 
District) 
Small omce Suites. 200- 
300', S250-5350/mo, in- 
cludes all utilities. Call 
days & ask for C. David <? 
(847)816-3500 



WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

1100sq.lt. office/industrial 

space. Large overhead 

door. Special 6 mo, lease. 

Was 5720 month 

NOW $595/mo. +Securily 

Available immediately. 

(847) 526-5000 

leave message. 



^rn^si^^B^Hfli^H 



■ ^ ■ vg 



Lahewood Village Apartments 



In Island Lake and Grayslake 

Ottering affordable housing for qualified applicants. 
Now accepting applications for our: 



• L 2 and 3 bedroom apartments 
Wheel-chair accessible, I bedroom 



Please call for more information or appointment at: 

(847) 223-6644 
TDD (800) 526-0844 

",..',. _ Mtix&on Gioop. Inc. 



tU 




§ j Business Property 
'J For Rent 



WAUCONDA. 321 N. MAIN 
St. Store or Office. Stand 
alone bldg. Ample parking. 
5775/mo. Avail, now. Call 
Lou Reynolds 847-526-5090. 



560 



Vacant Lots 
Acreage 



GURNEE LOCATED ON cut- 
de-sac in beautiful area. Lot 
9, Spruce Point Ct.. $75,500. 
(847)362-1480. 

LOOKING FOR A LOT? 1 
acre lot, Spring Grove, $2,000 
down, no interest or payments 
for 18 months or will discount 
for cash, -Call owner (815) 
676-4228. 

ROLLING 6 ACRES with 
pond, surrounded by State 
Preserve. . Perked conven- 
tional. Perfect for walkout. 
Walworth County. Burlington 
.Schools, S1 18,000. (262) 
767-0236. 

SPRING GROVE ESTATES. 
Lot 102. 1.75 acres, Perfect 
for walk-out, $80,000. 815- 
675-3690. 

SPRING GROVE LOTS (2) 

one acre lots with trees, will 
build to suit, $63,500 or 
558.500. (815) 675-6434 
after 6pm. 



568 



Out Of 
Area Property 



LAND FOR SALE Wisconsin 
Castle Rock area, fly-in or 
drive-in 5 acre wooded lot with 
grass runway access in back 
yard. State Public Lake ac- 
cess, 100 yards from front, 
with waier rights. Pilots build 
your fly in retreat, 20 minutes' 
from Wisconsin Dells. 
$36,000. Call Jim at (847) 
487-4697. 



ROMEITAiy- 

ForSale by Owner. 
ROME Trostevore HISTOR 
IC CENTER. Lovely condo 
restored 8. beaut, turn. All 
new. 5 rms & big gdn (all 
tiled), apprx lOOOsf total 
$229k (+S39k fuiiy furn) 
neg. Pics avail. 212-496 
B118 



TWENTY SEVEN ACRES, 
OLD house (needs lots of 
work), well, 1/4 mile to swim- 
min'hole, fishing, on dirt 
road. Taxes S45/yr. Four 
miles to Gilbert, Arkansas, 
$35,000. (870) 449-6765. 



704 



Recreational 
Vehicles 



1982 24FT. KAYOT PON- 
TOON BOAT, includes chairs 
and O/B motor, $4,500. (847) 
395-8637. 



WINNEBAGO 1985 MOTOR 
HOME, 27 ft. Like new. 
44.000K miles. Chevy 454 
VB, all the upgrades. Call 
and leave message at 
(847) 502-5056 

WINNEBAGO 66 ELANDAN 
Limited Edition Motor Home. 
Loaded 34* Class A. Twin 
air/heal. 6.5 KW generator. 
W/D. Very Special) $19,900. 
Phone: 262-857-7458. 



708 



Snowmobiles/ 
ATVS 



1986 INDY 400, new track. 
runs great, well maintained, 
excellent cqndition, $950. 
(847) 872-2750. 



1989 INDY 650 custom paint 
.like new. 192 carbide studs. 
Very last. $2,500/obo. Aft. 5 
PM 847-526-3079. 



708 



Snowmobiles/ 
ATVs 



SNOWMOBILE 1999 V-MAX 
500SX Custom Sled, must 
see, $5,000/best. (847) 
746-2907. 



710 



Boal/Motors/Etc 



14 FT. FIBERGLASS 
FISHING BOAT, .electric 
start, front & rear fish loca- 
tors, trolling motor, swivel 
seals, and trailer, 
$1 ,300/best. Call after 6pm 
weekdays, anytime wee- 
kends (847) 497-3004. 

SELL OUT SALE Small Pro- 
pellers, ski vests, accessories. 
(815) 385-4729. 



720 



Sports Equipment 



GOLF MACHINE COIN oper- 
ated; virtual reality. Great fori 
a home or business. Best off- 
er. (262) 694-8088. 



724 


Airplanes 



1946 LUSCHOMBE BA, 
65hp, with fabric wings, wood 
prop and skis. Recent paint 
and glass. Looks and flies 
great. $16,500. (414) 
248-8702. 



804 



Cars for Sale 



BU1CK 1995 SKYLARK, 
84K, auto., A/C. PW/PL, 
cass., white, good condition,, 
kids car, $6,000, (847) 
223-3276. 

CADILLAC 1975 ELDORA- 
DO CONVERTIBLE, 43,000 
original miles, 500 engine, pa- 
rade boot, all the goodies of its 
day, $7,500. Call for details 
after 6pm. (815) 675-2137. 

CADILLAC 1988 SEDAN 
DEVILLE extra clean, interior 
and exterior, excellent body, 
dark navy blue, leather seats, t 
power everything. A/C. $3,000 
or will trade for truck ol equal 
value. (847) 546-0209 after 
5pm. pager (847) 210-3675. 

CADILLAC 90. CLEAN. 66 
mi. 56.200. 262-308-5829. 

CHEVY 1975 CORVETTE 
Conv., red. 4-sp.. $9,000. 
1987 Ford F-150, $500. Best 
offers. (847) 838-4759. 

CHEVY 1975 CORVETTE 
Conv., red, 4-sp., $9,000. 
1987 Ford F-150, $500. Best 
offers. (847) 838-4759. 

CHEVY 1985 CORVETTE, 
red, automatic, rain tires, re- 
movable top, great shape, 
lower miles, 59,500/best. 
(847) 587-1881. 

CHEVY 1994 CAVALIER, 
A/C, ABS. newer tires, 72K. 
great gas mileage, 
$4,500/bes1. (847) 973-8189. 

CHEVY 1996 CAVAUER, 
looks and runs good, 
$6,000/besl. Days (847) 623- 
4141. evenings (847) 
623-9850. 

CHEVY 1998 CAVAUER LS. 
2.4L, 34K, A/C, power, ABS, 
AM/FM cassette, cruise, 

$9,500. (847) 662-5037. 

CHEVY 1999 METRO, 4,000 
miles. A/C, manual, 2 -do or, 
50MPG, best offer. (847) 
487-1847. 

CHRYSLER 1995 LEBARON 
CONVERTIBLE, white with 
black top, 48,000 miles, ex- 
cellent condition, $9,000. For 
more information call (262) 
862-6188. 

FORD 1991 T-BIRD, V8 with 
overdrive, 86,000 mi„ 2-door, 
very clean, loaded, garage 
kept, alarm system, $4,500. 
(847) 872-5221. 



^/IV5 



OAKRIDGE VILLAGE 
APARTMENTS 



Offering Affordable Housing jbr Qualified Applicants. 
Currently Accepting Applications on our 
1, Z & 3 Bedroom Apartments 
Wheel-chair accessible, 1 bedroom. 
Stop in at: 
299 Oakridgc Court in An tioch 
£| Orcalt 

Jy fCs 847-395-4840 

fe. S 1-800-526-0844 TDD . 




■nmgBUBHB 




^HB^^B^HBB^^BHi 



B18 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFII 



December 1, 2000 



804 



Cars for Sale 



FORD 91 ESCORT 5 spd. 
- Very dependable. Asking 
$1,250,262-859-0548. 

FORMULA FIREBIRD 1988, 
Ready for the winter! New 
tires, battery and tune-up, 
complete exhaust system, 
tinted windows and T-tops, 
$2,500. (847) 459-5659. 

HONDA 1996 ODYSSEY EX, 

champagne, like new condi- 
tion, 1 -owner, new tires, 
brakes, always maintained, 
65K miles. ' Must see, 
$13,900. (847)615-9950. 

LAKELAND IS OPEN 
24 HOURS 

If you need to place an ad in 

Classified, call us al 

(847)223-8161 ext. 193 

and leave a message. 

We will get back to you by 

• the next business day. Or 

you can fax our 24-hour fax 

lineal (847)223-2691. ( 

MAZDA 626, 1998, $11,995. 
(847) 662-2400. 

MAZDA MIATA 1996, am/fm 
cassette, 5-sp., air, new top, 
new tires, 56K. Great fun. 
Nice car. $9,200. (847) 
5B7-2347 after 4:30pm. 

MAZDA PROTEGE 1991, 
great second car, mint condi- 
tion, 98K ail hwy. miles, 
$3,000/best. (847) 735-81 54. 

MERCEDES 190E 1965, 
does not run, $l,500/best. 
Dan (815) 344-9679. 

MERCEDES 1986 300E, ex- 
cellent condition, loaded, 
well maintained, many ex- 
tras, $6,500. (847) 444-1123. 

OLDS 1991 CUTLASS, gray, 
has 4 new tires and brakes. 
Runs good, $2,300/bost. 
(847) 546-8458. 

OLDS 455, COMPLETLY RE- 
BUILT MOTOR. 12 BOLT-400 
TRANS. OVER $7,000 IN- 
VESTED. MUST SELL WILL 
TAKE OFFER. EVENINGS. 
(847) 356-6075 

PONTIAC 1990 SUNBIRD, 4- 
cyt., sunrool, $2,750/best. 
See al 3909 lOih Ave. (262) 
658-4981 after 6pm. 



804 



Cars for Sale 



PLYMOUTH 83 RELIANT 

35K ml. $2,000. Plymoulh 92 
Voyager 100K. $3,200, Both, 
exc. cond. Alt. 5PM. 847- 
395-2399. 



PLYMOUTH 94 VOYAGER 
One owner. 9 IK. Good cond. 
PW/PL/Tinled glass, child 
safety seats, AM/FM/Cass. 
$5,300. 847-356-1036. 



PT CRUISER LIMITED 2001. 
all extras loaded, low-low 
miles, garage kept, $25,900. 
(847) 746-6003 ask tor Den- 
nis. 



AUTO AUCTION 

OPEN TO THE PUBUC 

SALVATION ARMY 

Now Every Saturday 

9am. 

Ovor 100 to bo sold 

weekly to tho hlghost 

bidder. 

Opening bid $100. 

No reserve. 

Grand opening at our now 

location In Waukegan on 

Rto120, one block oast of 

Greonbay Road. 

(847)662-0100 



SUBMIT YOUR LAKELAND 
CLASSIFIED ADS ON THE 
INTERNET! 
Visit http://www.lpnews.com/ 
to place your ads conven- 
iently. Ads appear on the In- 
ternet, in all Lakeland Pa- 
pers,.. The Great Lakes Bul- 
letin and The Market Journal 
for only $20,50 for 4 lines 
(approximately 16 words), 
then .60c each additional 
line. 



TOYOTA 198B CELICA, au- 
tomatic, air, 112K, clean. 
Asking $1,800. 6505 28lh 
Ave. in back by alley. (262) 
657-0420, (262) 945-5955. 



TOYOTA 1995 CELICA, 

67,000 miles, red, runs great, 
good condition, loaded, 
$8,500/best. (847) 546^7324. 



TOYOTA 1996 CAMRY XLE, 
4-dr., V6, 77,000 miles, lull 
power, excellent condition, 
S10.9C0. (847)362-1214. 



814 



Service & Parts 



FLOW MASTER EX- 
HAUST MUFFLER, 3* In, 

dual 2-1/2" out. Brand new, 
never used. Paid $165, asking 
$50. (815)578-1237. 



824 


Vans 



CHEVY 1993 ASTRO TIME- 
LESS CONVERSION, 
$9,995. (847) 625-8400, 

CHRYSLER 1992 TOWN & 
COUNTRY, loaded, leather, 
quad seating. Must see 
$4,995. (815)675-9029. 

DODGE 1997 RAM VAN, 
$9,995. (847) 625-8400. 

FORO 1995 CLUB WAGON. 
$7,995. (847) 625-8400. 

FORD 1995 CUBE VAN, 
$8,995. (847) 625-8400. 



828 



Sport Utility 
Vehicles 



1995 LIMITED ISUZU 
TROOPER, 36,000 miles, 
green and silver 2-tone, fully 
loaded, keyless entry, alarm, 
heated leather seats, moon- 
roof, CD player, $16,900. 
(847) 973-0832. 

BLAZER 1999, 8K miles, 6 
cyl, fully loaded, power eve- 
rything, perfect cond., sport 
package. 4 wheel dr. 
$22,500. (815) 344-8612 or 
847-275-0150 

CHEVY 1991 K5 BLAZER, 
loaded, ex. cond., low miles, 
$8,000/best. (847) 433-1427. 

CHEVY 1993 BLAZER 4x4. 
2-dr., loaded, new tires, ex- 
haust, 89.000 miles. 
$7,300/best. (847) 265-7138. 

CHEVY 1993 S-10 BLAZER, 
$6,995. (847) 662-2400. 

CHEVY 1995 BLAZEH 4WD 
LS package, loaded, 
teal/gray cloth int., Vortec 
motor, gar. kept covered, 
55,000 mi., 1 -owner, 
$14,000/best. (847) 

336-5791. 

CHEVY 1997 BLAZER 4X4, 

$13,995. (847)662-2400. 



828 



.Sport Utility 
Vehicles 



CHEVY 1996 BLAZER LT, 
4WD, fully loaded, power 
sunroof, towing package, 
great shape, lower miles, 
$14,500/best. (847) 

587-1881. 

CHEVY 2000 BLAZER, 
$20,980.(847)831-5980. 

DISCOVERY 1997, $22,980. 
(847)831-5980. 

DODGE 199B DURANGO, 
$20,980. (847)831-5980. 

DODGE 2000 DURANGO 
SLT, $24,980. (847) 831- 
5980. 

FORD 1995 EXPLORER 
XLT, 4-door, 4WD, black, ex- 
cellent condition, $12,000. 
(847)265-0719. 

FORD 1998 EXPLORER, 
$17,980, (847) 831-5980, 

GEO TRACKER 1990, 
$3,995. (847) 625-8400. 

JEEP 1994 WRANGLER Sa- 
hara, hard top, air, 6 cyl, 
auto, ps, pb, exc. cond., 
107K, $10,500. (847) 

680-4442. 5pm 

JEEP 1996 CHEROKEE, 
$8,995. (847) 625-8400. 

JEEP 1998 CHEROKEE LIM- 
ITED, $19,995. (847) 625- 
8400. 

JEEP 1999 CHEROKEE 
4X4, $16,980. (847) 831- 
5980. 

JEEP 1999 WRANGLER, 
$20,980. (847)831-5980. 

JEEP 2000 WRANGLER, 
$15,995.(847)662-2400, 

JEEP CHEROKEE SE 1996, 
4x4. 2-door model, in great 
condition, A/C, lowing pack- 
age, sliding roof rack, cas- 
sette, low miles. Tune-up and 
now brakes April 1st, Car 
runs/looks great. $9,300. Days 
(847) 223-B161. evenings 
(847) 680-1966. Ask tor Bob 
or leave message. 



834 


Trucks/Trailers 



1986 MACK VALUE UNER. 
Very good condition, 300hp„ 
9-sp., wet kit, A/C, P/S, air 
ride cab, new filth wheel, etc. 
$15,000/best. 847-991-6356 
after 5pm. 

1994 MACK W/SLEEPER, 
$24,000. 1996 MACK 350hp, 
9-speed, set-up for gravel 
hauling, 240K. $40,000. 
(815) 344-6454, (815) 344- 
6454. 

1995 FREIGHTLINER 
SERIES 60 Detroit 350 en- 
gine, new clutch & batteries, 
325K miles, 10- speed with 
cruise control. Asking 
$3B,500/best. (847) 
438-7345. 

CHEVY 1987 3/4 TON 2WD 
350, unbelievable buy, au- 
tomatic, excellent condition, 
$4,500 with cap and rack. 
(847) 662-5202. 

CHEVY 1997 4X4 P/U. 
$14,995. (847) 625-8400, 

CHEVY 199B8 P/U EXTEND- 
ED CAB, $16,995. (847) 625- 
8400. 

CHEVY C1500 FULL SIZE 
1991, V6. with A/C, 32.000 
miles, low rider, yellow wilh 
mural on hood and tailgate. 
Very clean, garage kept. 
Pager (B47) 633-0567. 

DODGE 1996 PICKUP DA- 
KOTA CLUB SLT 4x4, VB, 
ABS, 30K, bed-llner/cab. 
olec, all powor, $17,000. 
Beautiful. (847)587-9183. 

DODGE 1997 RAM 2500, 
$16,980. (847) B31-59B0. 

DODGE 1997 RAM P/U. 
$13,980.(847)831-5980. 

DODGE 2000 DAKOTA, 
$17,980. (847) 831-5980. 

FLOW MASTER EX- 
HAUST MUFFLER, 3" in, 
dual 2-1/2' out, Brand new, 
never used. Paid $165, asking 
$50. (815) 578-1237. 

FORD 1993 F-150 XL 4X4, 
$6,995. (847) 625-8400. 



834 



Trucks/Trailers 



FORD 1995 RANGER 4X4 
XLT, X-cab, air, immaculate, 
low miles,. Sl0,300/bost. 
(262) 862-7875. 

N1ISSAN 1995 4X2 Pick-up, 
1 -owner, 60K mi., $5,400. 
(847) 662-8614, (847) 334- 
8614. 

TOYOTA 1997 TACOMA 4x4 
pickup, excellent condition. 
Price negotiable.' (262) 
694-7263, 



838 


Heavy Equipment 



DODGE 1999 DURANGO, 
$21,995.(847)662-2400. 

FOR SALE OR TRADE 2 
Ford 10 yard dump trucks, 1 
Bycrus-Erle draglines, 40' 
boom. 2 buckets, excellent 
condition, Call for inlo. (815) 
385-8959. 



844 


Motorcycles 



HONDA 1982 GOLDWING 
GL1100, 24K, full dresser, 
$2,700.(847)215-0898. 



S39 


Housekeeping 



ANTIOCH/TREVOR 

House Cleaning Exports. 

Bonded & Insured. 

Free Estimates 

(262) 862-2472. ' 

CLEANING QUEEN HOUSE- 
CLEANING 
Extremely reliable. 
Talk to us and you'll get a 
super shiny job, 
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ask for Sally. 
(847) 625-9133 
ask for Tina. 

HOUSECLEANING 

Experienced 

Excellent References 

Polish Lady. 

Call Beata or Bob 

(847) 471-0334. 

PROFESSIONAL 

HOUSECLEANING 

Me & Mr. Mom. 

Bonded 

References Available. 

Free Estimates. 

(847) 336-5635. 



S39 



Housekeeping 



WOMAN WILL DO 

HOUSECLEANING 

Very Dependable & Hones) 

Call 847-358-3027 



S42 



Landscaping. ■ 



S. HERNANDEZ 

LANDSCAPING 

•No Job Too Small 

•Quality Workmanship 

•Mowing 

•Tree Trimming 

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•Tree Planting. 

•Free Estimates 

•Fully Insured, 

Silverio Hernandez 

Round Lake Park, III. 

(847) 546-4617 or 721-4617. 



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Professional 
Services 



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Remodeling 



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Friday &. Saturday. 

December 8th & Oth - 7:00 PM 

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Walk into the magical world of a 
Rockwell painting on Christmas Eve. 
This is a delightful dramatic MUSICAL gS 
about Christmas Eve in ller/.og's *=** 



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free, hut required. They are available at 
church, or Sohshine " Book 
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Tiwwjlgwalkm 'Parish bmtex tjttu to: 

Be Aware • Prepare - Repent - Rejoice 
Welcome Home For Christmas! 

\\ "w \m\\ and \wuun ivMimu- hi mkjlinil I^Jk I 
Communal Reconciliation Service - Tuesday. Dec, 19th 7:'wp m 



CHRISTMAS F.VF. 

Sunday, December 24 
3:00 & 5:00 PM • Children's Liturgies 
10:00 PM - Christmas Carols and Mass 

CHRISTMAS PAY 

Mori clay, December 25 

1 2:30 AM - Polish Carol and Mass 

7:30,9:30, 1 1:30 AM - English Masses 

FEAST OF THE HOLY FAMILY 



Saturday and Sunday, December JO &}l 
Saturday- 5:00 PM English Mass 

6:30 PM - Spanish Mass 

7:30,9:30, 11:30 AM - English Masses 

6:00 PM - Polish Mass 



NEW YEAR'S DAY 

Monthly, January I 
8:00 and 1 0:00 AM - English Mass 
There will be NO other Mass 

FEAST OF THE EPIPHANY 

Saturday and Sunday, January 6 6 7 

Saturday - 5:00 PM English Mass 

6:30 I'M - Spanisli Mass 

Sunday • English Masses at 

7:30,9:30, 1 1 :30 AM 

6:00 PM - ft>!fsh Mass 

Fr. Tbomas fjtrfgbt - Pat or 

fr. Robert Af>utrrt - Associate Pastor 

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Lakeland Newspapers / B1 9 



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B20 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



December 1, 2000 



COLLEGE OF LAKE COUNTY SPORTS ROUNDUP 



Men's Basketball 

The Lancers have been on a slide lately in- 
cluding an 82-76 loss to Madison Tech on No- 
vember 24 and an 81-65 loss to North Park ]V 
on November 25. Aaron Coleman had 22 
points against MadisonTech while Daniel Gar- 
rett added 20 as the Lancers fell to 2-5 on the 
season. Jim Nilles then poured in 37 points, in- 
cluding eight three-pointers, but the Lancers 
fell to Triton 95-88. 

Garrett chipped in 19 points and dished 
out seven assists, jimichael Slaby 10 and Aaron 
Coleman 12 points, six rebounds, three assists, 
a steal and one block in a losing effort. 

Freshman Andy Yarc and Justin Claiborne 



also got into the act with six assists and five re- 
bounds, respectively. 

"We had a great effort and came back sever- 
al times," said head coach Rob Sandler, whose 
team fell to 2-6. "We just couldn't get over the 
hump." 

CLC hosts Illinois Valley Nov. 30. 

Women's Basketball 

The lady Lancers remain winless on the sea- 
son as they fell to 0-5 after a 93-30 loss to Kala- 
mazoo Valley on November 24 and a 51 -47 loss 
to jolieton November 25. Against Kalamazoo 
Valley, Jessica Gutierrez had nine points while 
Amy Emskamp scored eight. Gutierrez also led 



CORSAIR SPORTS NOTEBOOK 



Hockey 

The Carmel High School hockey 
team posted four straight victories en route to 
the title in the varsity white division of the Ice 
Palace Thanksgiving Tournament. Trailing 2-0 
after two periods, the Corsairs stormed back to 
beat St. Charles 4-3 in opening-round play. The 
four-goal rally included a hat trick by Pat Lynch 
with Adam Leman adding the other. Joe Miret- 
ti then found the net twice as Carmeldowned 
Marist 4-1 in second-round action. Lynch and 
Nolan Wilson added insurance goals. Miretti 
collected the hat trick and Wilson added two as 
the Corsairs cruised past Warren 5-2 in the 
third round. 

Avenging an early-season loss, Carmel 
rebounded in a big way by thumping Lake 
Park 5-0 in the championship game. Wilson 
and Miretti scored two goals apiece and 
Drew Jayhan added the other in the 
shutout. 

Strong defensive performances through- 
out the tournament were turned in by Adam 
Leman, Andy Wallor, PctcPioli, Drew Jayhan 
and Rob Allen. All three lines made signifi- 
cant contributions throughout the tourna- 
ment, including excellent goalkeeping by 
Dave Rogowski, to secure four straight victo- 



ries. 



East Suburban 
Catholic Conference 

All Conference certification-Soccer 
Benet Academy 

Benjamin Aguilar, Nicolas Aguilar, William 
Connolly, Alzonia Dennis, Gavin k'uhes, Luke Rojo 
Canncl High School 

Christopher Fagnant, Collin Gluncy, Adam 
Hughes, Jonathan Mikrut, Matthew Zeffcry 
Holy Cross High School 

Walter Hybak 
Juliet Catholic Academy 

Nicholas Majs7.uk 
Marlon Catholic High School 

Agustin Aguilar, Neamen Lewis 
Madst High School 

Daniel Kirkputrick, Sean Moran, Kamal Sekhri 
Notre Dame High School 

Paul Zubb 
Si. Joseph High School 

Alberto Boy, Uric Orozco, Hubert Orozco, 
Leonardo Rizzo 
St Patrick High School 

Daniel Hahivc, Devin Flahivc, Uartek Grabowski 
St Viator High School 

Steve Chromik Sergio Giovagnoli, Matthew 
Hummel, JefTrcy Jopa, Kenneth Peters 
2000 All-Conference players 

Dargan Henata, Amy Holmes, Jessie Janik, 
Caitlin Delong, UzKanc, Katie Case, Jordan Wilson, 
Michelle Marek, Sheila Kennedy, Allison Hoey 



1 Starting your own business? 
We can help you with an 
important requirement. 

Illinois law requires that individuals conducting business 
under any name other than the real name or names of the owners 
must file an Assumed Name Certificate with the County Clerk in 
the county in which the business is conducted. The certificate 
must be published in a newspaper of general circulation in the 
area, and the county will not register the business until 
publication notice is complete and the publisher returns a 
certificate of publication. 

Lakeland Newspapers makes this publication 
requirement simple and hassle-free. 

Fax your notice to (847) 223-2691. Notices received by 
10:00 A.M. Tuesday are first published in that week. Prepayment 
is required, unless the notice is filed by an attorney. We accept 
MasterCard, Visa and Discover. Our service is friendly and 
knowledgeable. Call (847) 223-8161, ext. 501 with any questions. 



The law requires publication for three successive weeks. 
Our charge for the complete publication is $75. After the third 
week of publication, we deliver the certificate of publication to 
the County Clerk. 




NEWSPAPERS 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

(847) 223-8161 



the team against Joliet with 14 
points while Kristen Pagano 
chipped in with 10. 

"Turnovers, turnovers and 
turnovers were the problems expe- 
rienced by us in the Joliet Tourna- 
ment," said head coach Bill Bra- 
man. 

The Lady Lancers then fell 
short to Triton, 58-40. Pagano net- 
ted 12, Stacie Peterson 11 and 
Stephanie Cripps 9 in the losing 
cause. 

Lake County (0-6) also hosts 
Illinois Valley Nov. 30 with tip-off 
slated for 5 p.m. 



Men's Athlete 
of the Week 

Daniel Garrett is the CLC men's athlete of 
the week. He had 14 points, five rebounds and 
seven assists against North Park and followed 
that up with 22 points in an 82-76 loss to Madi- 
son Tech. On the year, Garrett is one of the as- 
sist and free-throw percentage leaders in Re- 
gion IV. 

Other News 

CLC is hosting a baseball camp from 1 
p.m. .-4 p.m. on December 26 through the 29th 
in the CLC gymnasium. The camp will be in- 




structed by Lancer baseball coaches Gene 
Hanson and Glen Jewell as well as several cur- 
rent team members. 

Players will improve their skills in the in- 
field, outfield and at the plate. The camp is 
limited to 36 boys aged 14-15 only. The cost 
of (he camp is SBO dollars and all participants 
will receive a camp T-shirt. All those inter- 
ested should make checks payable to: CLC 
Baseball. All checks should be sent to: CLC 
Baseball Attention: Gene Hanson, 19351 VV. 
Washington St., Grayslake, IL 60030. 



LOCAL COLLEGE SPORTS HIGHLIGHTS 



Jeff Dougherty of UbertyvUle is a 

member of the Western Michigan University 
precision flight team, the Sky Broncos, that 
took second place in regional competition in 
October, guaranteeing the team a berth in next 
spring's national competition in North Dako- 
ta. 

In a close competition that was decided 
by only three points, the 15-mcmbcrteam look 
second to Ohio State University at the Nation- 
al Intercollegiate Plying Association Region III 
competition. 

. The Sky Broncos have finished in the top 
three in national competition for nine consec- 
utive years and last captured the national 
championship in 1998. 

The Sky Broncos took first place in the 
ground events that are part of the competition 
and second place overall in the flight events. 
Leading the Sky Broncos performance in the 
flight events was Christopher Wescott, an avi- 
ation flight science senior from Bloom field 
Hills, Mich., who captured second in the "Top 
Pilot" standings for the event. Jeff Haney, a 
Clarklake, Mich., senior in aviation flight sci- 
ence, came in fifth in the "Top Pilot" standings. 
Wescott and Haney, along with Mike Cherry, a 
junior from Charlevoix, Mich., are the team's 
captains. 

In the ground events, the Sky Broncos 
swept the first four places in aircraft recogni- 



tion and took second through fourth places in 
both the flight computer accuracy and prc- 
flight competitions. 

NIFA regional and national competitions 
pit competing schools against each other in 
five ground events and four flying events, team 
points are earned by competitors who place in 
the top 10 in each of the events. 

Dougherty, a sophomore majoring in 
aviation flight science, is the son of Roe 
Dougherty of Libertyville and Kevin Dougher- 
ty of Gurnce. Jeff placed second in flight com- 
puter accuracy and 12th in the flight simula- 
tor. 

Former Warren product and Gurnce 
resident Clay Scott led the Illinois Wesleyan 
men's soccer team with seven goals while 
Grayslake natives and former Rams Josh 
Shipley and Chris Wirslng finished with 
three and four goals, respectively. Shipley led 
the Titans with six assists while Wirsing dished 
out four. Lake Zurich product Paul Zidron 
recorded four goals on the season as IWU fin- 
ished 9-8-1. 

Sticking with the Titans, Waukcgan na- 
tive and former Warren Blue Devil Lauren 
Bocgen turned in a solid freshman year, scor- 
ing four goals while dishing out six assists. 
Teammate JU1 Denoma (Lake Villa, Carmel 
U.S.) scored a goal and tallied four assists in her 
first season. 



YOUTH SPORTS BEAT 



Jr. Cougar 
Cheerleader Camp 

Join the Vemon Hills High School Cheerleaders 
as they host a camp for all girls ages 5 and older on 
Deccmher2nd from 9-2pm and ihcn again from 530 
to the end of the Varsity Basketball game. 

Hie excitement begins with the VHHS Cheer- 
leaders teaching the Jr. Cougars cheers and sideline 
routines that the girls perform during the games so 
that they will be able to cheer along with them at fu- 
ture games. Each Jr. Cougar will learn a half-time 
show to perform with the VHHS Cheerleaders dur- 
ing the December 2 home basketball game held at 
the Vernon Hills HighSchool.The cost is $50.00 and 
each Jr. Cougar will receive a T-shirt, a cougar paw, a 
smaller version of our ribbon, special cheering sec- 
tion, half-time performance, and will be in the 
record books for the Vernon Hills High School. Reg- 
istration and payment will be taken the morning of 
the camp on December2nd in the Vernon Hills High 
School Gym. 

And, all sixth, seventh and eighth grade boys 
who will be attending the Mundelein High School 
and are presently living in the Mundelein High 
School District are invited to tryout for the 
Mundelein Mustangs junior traveling Basket- 
ball Feeder League. 

Tryouts will be held Dec. 2nd and 9th at the Fre- 
mont "Elementary" Gym. 
Dec. 2nd tryouts ore as follows: 

Sixth grade boys from 10 a.m.-noon 

Seventh grade boys from noon-2 p.m. 

Eighth grade boys from 2-4 p.m. 
Dec 9th schedule Is: 

Sixth grade boys from noon- 130 p.m. 

Seventh grade boys from 1 :30-3 p.m. 

Eighth grade boys from 3-4 p.m. 

The season starts Jan. 3 and continues up to 
spring break. Once selected for the team, the fee 



will be SlfiS per player. For information, call Royal 
at 566-1782. 

If you're looking to 'satisfy your compeietive 
spirit,' love to play fastpitch Softball and want to play 
with and against some of (lie best players in North- 
ern Illinois, this is your chance! The Mundelein 
Thunder of the Mundelein Girls Softball Asso- 
ciation is holding open tryouts for the 2001 season. 
The ASA-Jimior Olympics sanction the Mundelein 
Thunder. 

You'll have an opportunity to improve your 
skills while having more fun. The Thunder plays 30- 
40 games, including local travel league and weekend 
tournaments. Games will be against teams from all 
over die the state as well as some out-of-state. 

We also offer Winter Clinics, beginning in Jan- 
uary, to provide training on both basic and advanced 
skills. Games will begin in late May-early June {de- 
pending on your age level) and continue through the 
end of July. 

The specifics: 

Who; All girls who want to play fastpitch soft- 
ball at a competitive level and who will be at least 8- 
years-old and no older that age 18 on January 1 , 2001. 
When: Two tryout dates have been scheduled: 
Sunday, Decembers, 20O0 
8-12-year-olds, 1:30-2:30 p.m. 
13-18-year-olds, 2:30-3:30 p.m. 
Where: West Oak Middle School, 500 North Acorn 
Lane, Mundelein, IL60060 
What to bring: Softball glove and good quality in- 
door gym shoes. Wear loose, comfortable clothing. 
You may bring your own bat if you prefer, but we will 
supply bats at the tryouts. 

Other information: You will be tested on basic 
catching, throwing, fielding, hitting and base run- 
ning skills. Pitchers will have die chance to demon- 
strate pitching skills separately. 

Interested parties can also check out die Thun- 
derwebsiteatwww.eteamz.com/MundeleiiiThunder. 



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LIFE'S A BEAR 

Part one of Sprucey, the 
blue Christmas tree / B2 



CRITIC'S CHOICE 

Opera of horror: 'In the 
Penal colony' / B8 



MOVIE REVIEW 

'Grinch' provides a 
needed family film /B8 



POLL OUT 

SECTION 




Entertainment & Leisure 




NEWSPAPERS 



December 1-7, 2000 




he lofty strains of "O Holy Night" filled the Viking 
Park Dance Hall as men and women stood togeth- 
er rehearsing for an upcoming holiday concert. 
The voices of al the singers blend together harmo- 
niously. All ages are represented. 

All over Lake County, groups of people from di- 
verse backgrounds meet to share in a common 
love — singing. 
Mark Samuels of Great Lakes noted what a stress reliever it 
is for him to sing with the90-member men's barbershop-style 
group, the Great American Chorus. "I guess 
I'm a little bit of a ham at heart," he added. 

Viking Park Singer Nancy Strand of 
Round Lake Beach said her chorus' rehearsal 
is the highlight of her week. "Once you hear, 
this group, you just want to join because it's a 
lot of fun." 

Wauconda resident Lorraine Pellant has 
been a member of the Chain O'Lakes Chorus since 1994, a 
member of Sweet Adelines International. Her family's involve- 
ment really set the stage for her to sing in a barbershop-style 
group. "I joined it (the chorus) for the music, but 1 discovered 
it's a sisterhood," she shared. "There's a wonderful support 
group," 

Great American Chorus, Viking Park Singers and Chain 
O'Lakes Chorus are just three singing groups performing all 
over the area and including members from Lake County and 
beyond. 

Other Viking Park Singers noted their love of singing as rea- 
son to join the group. Gurnce resident Marcia Niemi, who 
joined the singers in April, is looking forward to her first holiday 
concert. "I came to sing because I haven't sung since high 
school and college," she said. 

Group veteran Dorothy White of Grayslake has been with 
the group since Its inception 1 1 years ago, after responding to a 
notice placed in the newspaper. "I stay because I love it. It's just 
a wonderful group," she said. "There isn't a person here that 
doesn't love what they're doing." 




Since its inception, the Viking Park Singers has doubled in 
size from 25 to over 50 currently, Grayslake resident Mike 
Strand has performed with the singers on and off for the past 10 
years. It was his involvement that brought his mother, Nancy, 
into the group. "I like the carefree attitude, and the music's 
fun," he shared. 

Jan Winckel-Smith of Fox Lake has also been with the 
group since its inception. Viking Park Singers is affiliated with 
the Gurnee Park District and is open to anyone in the area, not 
just Gurnee residents. Winckel-Smith said of the chorus, "I love 
'em. They're like a big family." 

She added that she enjoys singing. "It's incredible therapy," 



Three area choruses bring together 
Lake County residents . 



she shared, "i can come in here in the worst mood and come 
out happy." 

Great American Chorus chapter president Ron Rank of 
Grayslake began singing barbershop style 26 years ago when he 
drove by a van with the logo of a barbershop chorus on it He 
put his business card on the windshield and was invited to a re- 
hearsal. "I haven't stopped since!" he said. "I like the fact that 
it's a cappella and we have the opportunity to express our- 
selves — to sing from the heart." 

The songs sung by the men's group are familiar to 
many. "We sing songs that are G-rated," Rank 
laughed. 

Tom Toftey drives from Wheaton to sing 
with the men weekly at their rehearsals at 
Lakehurst Mall in Waukegan. "Nobody talks 
about work, nobody talks about what you 
do for a living. Music is the common de- 
nominator," he said, noting that instead 
they ask each other what part they sing. 
Carrie Jenkins of Island Lake 
has been a member of the 
Chain O'Lakes Chorus for nine 
years. "I came for the singing, 
and I stayed for the relation- 
ships," she shared. "It's tike 
having 30 other sisters." 
She said (he group gives 
her a break from the 
other things in her 
life, such as family 
and job responsi- 
bilities. "It's a la- 
bor of love." 
Fellow chorus 
member Pel- 



lant particularly enjoys the style of singing the group does. "You 
kind of transcend the mechanics of singing," she said, "when 
you learn a piece that thoroughly." She said it has been de- • 
scribed as singing in "a zone." She also noted that her director 
sets a very positive tone for the group, which fosters a loving 
and caring atmosphere among the women. 

The directors each enjoy their interaction with their group 
as well. Beach Park resident Rita Byrd is in her seventh season 
with the Viking Park Singers. "It's my love of music, and this 
particular group of singers is a really nice bunch of people," she 
said of the reason she enjoys the chorus. The director said she 
also enjoys friendships with the community singers. 

The coed Gumee group could use more men to 
sing bass in the four-part harmony, Byrd added. 
There is no audition to join the group, though 
those who are interested usually have some expe- 
rience singing with a chorus, she noted. 

The Viking Park Singers will host two perfor- 
mances for the holiday concert, Dec. 2 at 7 p.m. 
and Dec. 3 at 4 p.m. at the Viking Park Dance Hall, 
4374 Grand Ave. in Gumee. Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for 
students age 6-18 and free for children under 5. Refreshments 
will be served following the performance. For more informa- 
tion on the group or the concert, call 623-7788. 

Please see MUSIC /LAKEUFE2 



Above, Mark Samuels of Great Lakes and Scott 
Davidson of Oak Creek, Wis., rehearse as part of The 
Great American Chorus at the Lakehurst Mall in 
Waukegan. Below, Bobbie O'Donnell and Barbara 
Russell rehearse with the Viking Park Singers for 
their annual holiday program under the direction of 
Rita Byrd at the Viking Park dance hall in Gurnee. At 
right, Rita Byrd directs the Viking Park Singers in 
Gurnee. — Photos by Sandy Bressner and Lynn Gun- 
narson Dahtstrom 





I 



MICHELLE HABRYCH 
Staff Reporter 



2 LAKELIFE 



Lakeland Newspapers 



December 1 ,2000 



Kirk Players presents holiday children's show 



The Kirl$ Players will stage the group's i 
Eighth Annual Holiday Children's Show, "The 
Trial of Goldilocks," on Dec. 840 at 
Mundelein High School auditorium. 

Written by Joseph Robinette, the fairy tale 
fantasy is full of rhyme, mime and other won- 
derful theatrical stunts, and ideal for children 
of all ages. The tale has Goldilocks being 
brought to trial on charges of breaking and 
entering, and examines the familiar fairy tale 
from three points of view: The traditional, the 
Bears' and Goldilocks. 

The theatre troupe has been doing a holi- 



day children's show since 1992 and has 
drawn audiences of thousands over the years. 
The group also offers free Summer Work- 
shops for children from age 7-13, where chil- 
dren can learn the fundamentals of the craft 
in a games-oriented six-week program. 

Reserve your tickets early for "The Trial of 
Goldilocks." Call John Lynn at 566-6594. Per- 
formances are scheduled for Dec. 8-9 at 7 
p.m., and Dec. 9-10 at 2 p.m. Tickets are 
priced: Adults $7, seniors $5 and children un- 
der 12-years-of-age $3. Visit their web 
site:@www.geocities.com/kirkplayers. 



FROM LAKELIFE 1 



MUSIC 



Director Greg Lyne was part of the found- 
ing group for the Great American Chorus, 
which began four years ago. A Kenosha, Wis. 
resident, Lyne works for the Barbershop Har- 
mony Society as a director of music and edu- 
cational services. Prior to that he was a choral 
director for many years at the university level. 

Lyne said his group is composed of "busi- 
nessmen who like to work hard and put forth 
an effort." The men expect to work hard, he 
explained. "We're trying to be as fine a male 
singing ensemble as we can be." 

The men in the chorus come from all over 
Illinois, Wisconsin, Indiana and Michigan. 
One man even flies in for performances from 
New Hampshire! Lyne said the chorus has 
fun, as well as a strong work ethic. 

The group would like to continue to grow, 
said Tony Camacho, media relations coordi- 
nator and member of die chorus. There are 
auditions, but he stressed that it's a hobby. 
Men who sing in the shower or in the car and 
can carry a tune would most likely pass the 
audition. 

The group's second annual holiday show 
is scheduled for Dec. 16 at Stevenson High 
School in Lincolnshire. A matinee will be per- 
formed at 2:30 p.m. with an evening show at 
7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $13. To order tickets 
with a credit card or for more information, call 



1-888-494-8705 or on the web site at 
www.grcatamericanchorus.org/shows.htm. 

Chain O'Lakes Chorus director CarolAnn 
Bagley has performed with Sweet Adelines 
choruses since 1959, mostly around the 
Chicagoland area. The Mundelein resident 
has been with the Crystal Lake-based chorus 
for 11 years. 

"It's been just a blast! They're a great 
bunch of gals. I've grown a lot in directing 
them, and it's been a really fun ride," Bagley 
said. 

The35-mernber group is also looking to 
grow. "We are always looking for females who 
can carry a tune," the director said. Auditions 
are required, and interested women are en- 
couraged to see what the group is all about by 
stopping by and singing some Christmas mu- 
sic with the group. 

There are a few opportunities to hear the 
women perform this month. On Dec. 5, Uiey 
will be wrapping presents and caroling at 
Bames and Noble in Crystal Lake at 7 p.m. 
They will perform from 7:30-8 p.m. at Spring 
Hill Mall Dec. 7 and "A Stroll Around the Brink 
St. Mall" at 7 p.m. Dec. 15. The women will 
also be ringing the Salvation Army bell at 
Sam's Club in Crystal Lake Dec. 16 from 11 
a.m.-l p.m. For more information on the cho- 
rus, call 622-5268. 



r 



; 





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NEWSPAPERS 



Mi^Cxd\ 

<^m l 30 S. Whitney St. 
OfdCf **n* Grayslake 

\ ToW I ^ (847) 2238161 

Open: 
Mon. - Fri. 
8:30 - 5:00 



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The story of Sprucey, 
the blue Christmas tree 



The wind whispered the news through 
the North Woods that day: 
"Santa Glaus wants a Christmas tree. 
He's on his way!"- 
The other trees all were surprised 
and delighted. 
But me? I was not in the least bit excited. 

"He'll want ME. I know. Pines are 

chosen the most." 

said Scotchy, the pine tree, who so 

loved to boast. ■ 

"Not true. He will want one as tall as the sky," 

said Douglas, the fir. He's a big tree. No lie! 

And so on, and so forth, it went 

through the forest, 

the boasting of trees Filled the air 

like a chorus. 

Their branches were snapping, and 

crackling with glee. 

They bragged and they argued. "He'll pick 

ME." "No, ME!" 

But I didn't say much because, after all, 

I'm just a blue spruce tree, and not very tall. 

The wind blew my seed to the 

ground years ago 

Next to Douglas the fir tree and 

his large shadow 

His size blocked my sun, so I never grew tall. 

Santa Claus wouldn't want ME. 

I'm blue and I'm small. 

Still, I have to admit, that the sight 

of his sleigh 

As it flew from the sky, on that cold, 

snowy day, 

Made me feel just a smidgen of hope 

and delight 

As I pictured myself decorated and bright. 

And when I spotted Rudolph, with his 

nose so red, 

I'll admit that another dream 

popped in my head 

Yes, I know it seems silly; 1 know 

that I'm wrong. 

But I've always wished I had my own 

Christmas song! 

I watched as our Santa Claus walked through 

the forest. 

He tried to ignore the loud crackling 

tree chorus. 

He paced, and he scratched at his 

flowing white beard. 

And he walked right on past me, 

just as I feared. 

Then suddenly, Santa Claus turned 

back around. 

It's Scotchy, I thought, as my branches 

drooped down. 

But to my surprise, he walked right up to ME. 

He s'aid, "You're the one. You arc MY 

Christmas tree." 

Santa Claus took me with him, right then, 

right that minute, 

He walked up to his sleigh, and he 

loaded me in it. 

As we flew up away from my home 

in the forest, 

we heard only silence. No more crackling 

tree chorus. 

"Excuse me," 1 whispered, "I can't 

help but wonder. 

It's not that I'm saying that you've 

made a blunder. 

I just can't imagine why you'd want 

to pick ME, 

when you could have had Scotchy or some 

other tree. 




LIFE'S A 
BEAR 



DonnaAbear 



•#■ 








Part 1 of 4 

"Ho, ho, ho, little Sprucey, 1 know 

what I've done. 

I have made the right choice, and it's YOU. 

You're the one. 

1 wanted a tree that was humble and kind. 

Yes, sir, my blue spruce, you're what 

1 had in mind. 

You see, I have a job that I know 

you'll do right. 

There's a family who needs you this 

Christmas Eve night 

For twenty-four hours, I'll give you my magic 

To bring hope to someone whose life has 

turned tragic 

And if you can do this, my little spruce tree, 

If you can bring joy to this one family 

You'll find that you won't have to 

wait very long 

To hear someone sing out YOU R name 

in a song." 

For the rest of our trip, I did not say a word. 

It was hard to believe what I'd actually heard. 

But before long, the sleigh circled 

over a town, 

And a Christmas tree lot is where 

he set me down. 

Santa Claus and his reindeer all 

waved goodbye. 

Then quick as a wink, the sleigh 

took to the sky. 

There I was, in the city, Joe's 

Christmas tree lot. 

There 1 stood, shy and scared, 

in my corner spot. 

The Christmas tree shoppers came all 

that long day. 

Each hour they took more and 

more trees away. 

And when finally, Joe's Christmas tree 

lot was closed, 

The only tree left was...who do you suppose? 

To be continued next week... 



If you enjoy her column, check out Don- 
na'sbook, "Mom... you're not NAKED, are 
you?" available at Books, Etc. or J. J. Blinkers 
inAntioch, onlineatAmazon.com or Donna's 
web site at www.lifesabear.com. You can 
reach Donna by e-mail at 
donnadPlifesabear.com or by mail at P. O. Box 
391,Antioch,IL60002 



Drive through a winter wonderland 



> 



Northern Illinois' largest drive- 
through Holiday Light Festival is 
open now through Dec. 30 on the 
grounds of the Cunco Museum 
and Gardens in Vernon Hills. In its seventh 
year, A Winter Wonderland is a holiday tra- 
dition that will long be remembered. The 
magnificent grounds of the Cuneo provide a 
fairytale backdrop for this event sponsored 
by the Village of Vernon Hills. 

The one-and-a-half-mile light festival 
route is illuminated by millions of twinkling 
lights and dozens of animated light displays 
. depicting many of your favorite holiday 
scenes and characters. 

Become immersed in the fantasy of 
"Imagination Station" where your favorite 



action heroes and storybook, cartoon, tele- 
vision and movie characters come to life in a 
magical, wooded wilderness that will bring 
smiles to young and old alike. 

To reach the Cuneo Museum and Gar- 
dens, drive west on Rte. 60, past Milwaukee 
Ave. (Rt.21) and Hawthorn Center to Lake- 
view Parkway. Turn north on Lakeview Pkwy. 
to the entrance to Winter Wonderland. 

Cost is $5 per vehicle on weekdays and 
$7 per vehicle on weekends. Hours are Sun- 
day through Thursday from 6-10 p.m. and 
Friday through Saturday from 6-11 p.m. 
Winter Wonderland is opened until Dec. 30 
and will be closed Christmas Eve and Christ- 
mas Day. For more information, call 1-800- 
LAKENOW. 






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December 1, 2000 



Lakeland Newspapers 



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Friday night jam session 




By Patrick Reninger 



Eighty -five-year-old blues pianist John 
Campbell firmly places a wrinkled hand on 
the keyboard in the back room of the David 
Adler Cultural Center and begins to play the 
introduction to "Rosetta," his hands leaping 
from chord to chord with a syncopated drive 
that defies the brittle bones and slower reflex- 
es of eight hard decades. 

The Friday night jam session at the Adler 
Cultural Center in Libertyville gave this old Al- 
abama piano man an opportunity to pursue a 
music he had given up on nearly 30 years ago 
io provide his family with the stability of a day 
job and a steady income. 

Yet, if plans go forward by certain mem- 
bers of the Adler's board of directors, music 
on Friday nights which has been temporarily 
canceled may be permanently leaving John 
and other musicians in search of a welcome 
space where they can make music together. 

For more than 25 years, a wide variety of 



musicians, playing every- 
thing from traditional blue- 
grass to boogie woogie pi- 
ano, have gathered at Adler 
simply to make music. There 
is John Campbell, a resident 
of Zion and an AJabama- 
bom blues pianist who start- 
ed his career playing in juke 
joints, hon ky tonics and la- 
bor camps throughout the 
country during the Great De- 
pression. 

There is Earl Bammeis- 
ter, a banjo player and singer 
from London, Kentucky, 
who partners with another 
Kentuckian named Charlie 
and creates haunting coun- , 
try harmonics that are as an- 
cient as the soil and as chilling as one's last 
heartbreak. Most of all, there are dozens of 
musicians with a wide range of backgrounds 




John Campbell, blues artist 



and talents who have drifted 
into the Adler on a Friday 
night for more than a quar- 
ter-century simply to sing or 
play a heartfelt song with 
others. 

You would think that, with 
the wealth of music avail- 
able in this vast metropoli- 
tan area, there would be 
many places where local 
musicians could gather to 
make music together. Yet 
the sad fact is that, other 
than open mikes and smoky 
bars, the places one can 
gather with others to make 
music are few. 

Sure, if you're interested in 
a career as a singer or song- 
writer or if you want to form a cover band and 
entertain the patrons of the neighborhood tav- 
ern , there are outlets for your musicianship; 



Yet if you simply want to gather some 
folks together to play some tunes without . 
having to deal with cigarette smoke, self-pro- 
motion or the politics of keeping a band in- 
tact, the number of venues where you can 
play is scarce to non-existent 

The Adler, which gets much of its funding 
based on its reputation as a center for the ex- 
pansion of folk music and culture, has no 
event that captures the spirit of folk music 
more than die Friday night open jam. 

Folk music evolved not for the concert 
stage nor to fill coffeehouses nor to promote 
record albums. The history of folk music, 
whether it is gospel quartets, bluegrass, 
klezmer or jugband blues, evolved out of the 
need for people to join together and express 
their lives in song. 

Editor's note: Patrick Reninger is a music 
fan with far-reaching tastes. He attends as 
many suburban events as possible. He is a resi- 
dent of Park Ridge. 



Give unique gifts that give back 



Whether shopping for a nature 
lover, a history buff or golf en- 
thusiast, the Like County Forest 
Preserves offers unique and 
meaningful gift ideas this holiday season. A 
perfect gift for the "hard-to-buy- for" or M the- 
pcrson-that-has-cvcrything" could be found 
a i the Forest Preserve office or Lake County 
Discovery Museum gift shop. Some gift ideas 
include: 

»Blrdlng books such as "A Birder's guide to 
the Chicago Area," by Lynn Carpenter and 
loci Greenberg— S31. Call 968-3321 
•Golf Gift Certificates— good for green fees, 
cart rental or pro shop merchandise at any 
lake County Forest Preserves goirdub. — any 
amount. Call 223-55-12 



•Green Gifts — Sponsor an acre of prairie, a 
redtailed hawk or a summer intern. The pos- 
sibilities are endless, custom-tailor your gift 
to match any interest. — any amount. Call 
968-3206 for a brochure with details. 
•Hiking Staffs— Handcrafted of genuine 
Ozark hardwood, each piece is made to show 
the grain and beauty of the wood. The lac- 
quered sticks are 54-inches tall and feature a 
leather lanyard.— $20 each. Call 367-6640. 
•Friends of Ryerson Woods 
Membership— New member welcome 
package includes certificate and newsletter. 
Benefits include discounted admission to se- 
lected Ryerson Woods events and invitations 
to member-only receptions, art openings and 
field trips.— $30 individual membership, oth- 
er levels available. Call 968-3321. 



•Lake County Discovery Museum Mem- 
bership— Members enjoy free admission, a 
discount in the Museum store and a sub- 
scription to the Historian or Image File. Dues 
support education programs, special events 
and exhibits.— $25 basic membership, other 
levels available. Call 986-3400. 

Gift purchases help support the Lake 
County Forest Preserves and the Lake County 
Discovery Museum. 

Over 22,190 acres make up the Lake 
County Forest Preserves. The Forest Pre- 
serves offers innovative education, recre- 
ational and cultural opportunities of regional 
value that reflect a commitment to environ- 
mental and fiscal responsibility. For informa- 
tion, visit the General Office at 2000 Milwau- 
kee Ave., Libertyville or call 367-6640. 



Museum Store 
Holiday Sale 

The Lake County Discovery Mu- 
seum, 27361 N. Forest Preserve RcL, 
, WaUconda, will hold a Museum 
Store Holiday Sale on Saturday, 
Dec 2 from 1 1 a.m.-430 p.m. and on 
Sunday Dec 3 from 1-4:30 p.m. 

Tlie sale is a special opportunity 
to browse a selection of handmade 
crafts, history books, postcard related 
gifts, museum merchandise and other 
collectibles and receive a 10% dis- 
count off all merchandise. 

Call 986-3400 for information. 



1 - - ■ '< ;■■. '• i -. 1 



wm 




I^BBiBE 




Give Good 

News to 

Friends & 

A subscription to their community newspaper, 
Holiday special $9.99. Hurry, offer ends December 21, 2000. Call 245-7500. 






MSSfttetd^ tmmmmbA [fffiftwii^ 






NEWSPAPERS 






'■■-■-■■ .*"'-■- ■' ' ■■■ -'..-■■ :~ . ■ .- ... .v ■ wr— - ZZ 



4 LAKELIFE 



Lakeland Newspapers 



December 1,2000 



' 



HOLIDAY EVENT 

An imaginative 
retelling of the classic tale 

The Attic Playhouse will open its production of the Dickens classic, "A Christ= 
mas Carol," on Friday, December 1 at f] p.m. The production will run on Fri- 
day, Saturdays and Sundays through December 23. 
The play takes place on Christmas Eve, 1843. Charles Dickens is alone in his 
dark and isolated attic room, thinking of his past as he struggles to write his autobiogra- 
phy. I lis family and friends are all gathered downstairs preparing their annual holiday 
celebration and at the same time bothering his concentration, Dickens starts to envi- 
sion what it would be like to meet himself as a young child, and is suddenly inspired. By 
forcing himself to remember his childhood, a lost love, bis disappointments and having 
to work on Christmas, he dreams up the beginning of "A Christmas Carol." 

Dickens rushes to tell his party guest about his vision. His guests are thrilled and 
encourage him to tell them this wonderful new story he has conjured up. In turn, Dick- 
ens himself portrays the miserly Scrooge as all of his guest don costumes and props to 
portray the other characters as he creates them. Scrooge's journey — aproduct of Dick- 
en's own imagination— leads Dickens and the audi- 
ence into an understanding of being truly alive 
and enjoying life. 

Show times are Fridays and Saturdays 
at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 3 p.m., through 
Dec. 23. Special Saturday matinees will be on 
Dec. 1 6 and 23 at 3 p.m. The Attic Play- 
house is located at 410 Sheridan Rd., 
Highwood. 
Tickets are $14 in advance and $15 at 
the door. Special discounts are given to 
senior citizens, students with ID, military 
personnel and groups. Dinner packages for 
$29 arc available with The Two Guys from 
Italy restaurant, located in the same build- 
ing. For tickets or further information, call 
433-2660. 

David A. Breslow, Ethan Prizant, 
Michelle McKay and Kathryn McE- 
neely in "A Christmas Carol." Adap- 
tation by Michael Paller. Now run- 
ning at the Attic Playhouse, through 
Dec. 23. 




KIDS STUFF 



Drawing, sculpture class offered 



New Century Clayworks Pottery Studio, 
83 Ambrogio Dr., Gurnee, will offer two new 
classes for this winter. 

The first class is a basic drawing skills 
class for clay workers, craft artists or partici- 
pants who would like to learn about various 
drawing skills and techniques. 

"I believe that drawing skill can help pot- 
ters and other craft artists see their works in 
new ways as well as to provide new options 
for decorating the surfaces of their works," 
say studio owner Paula Pederson. 

The instructor for this class will be local 
Tine artist, Janice Snow Metzger who has 
taught drawing and painting classes and 
workshops for many area organizations in- 
cluding the David Adler Cultural Center, The 
Lakes Region Watercolor Guild and the Gene- 
va Lakes Art Association, among others. Jan's 
work was featured in a recent issue of Tlie 
Artist's Magazine. The Basic Drawing Class 
will be offered on Saturdays for 8 weeks be- 
ginning January 6, from II a.m.-l p.m. 
The second class being offered is a Clay 



Sculpture class and will be taught by award- 
winning clay artists, Mariel Farlow. 

"When 1 saw the beautiful and skillful 
pieces she was creating, I asked Mariel if she 
would like to teach a class for my studio," says 
Pederson. 

Mariel Farlow has studied at the Art Insti- 
tute in Chicago, the Sculpture Center in New 
York city and did graduate work at Emerson 
College in Sussex, England. One of her most 
notable accomplishments was her terra cotta 
portrait of her daughters which represented 
the State of Maine in the National Bicenten- 
nial Exhibition of Mother Artists of America in 
Washington D.C. and won second place in 
the nation. The focus or this first series of 
classes will be to explore various elements of 
the human face and facial expressions. Class- 
es will be held Friday afternoons, I -3 p.m. for 
8 weeks beginning January 26. 

For more information about these and 
other classes offered contact New Century 
Clayworks at 625-1799 or visit the web site at 
www.newclayworks.com. 



Knee high naturalist 

Discover the season's changes through your 
child's eyes as you explore outdoors with a natural- 
ist. Activities include stories, crafts and a nature 
hike. The class, held on Dec. 9 from 10- 11:30 a.m., 
is Tor adults with children ages 4-kindergartcn. 
Cost is $14 t$10 for Lake Co. residents) per 
adult/child pair. $7 ($5 for Lake. Co. residents) per 
extra child. Registration and pre-payment re- 
quired. Class held at the GreenbcU Cultural Center, 
Ric. 131, Waukcgan. Call 968-3321 for information. 

Meaning of Christmas 

The Northbrook Park District will hold a Ce- 
ramic Bell Workshop on Sunday, Dec. 3, from 1-3 
p.m. at the Park Dist. Leisure Center, 3323 Walters 
Ave., Northbrook. Children 8-12 are invited to cre- 
ate and design bells made from clay. Each will be 
individually fired in a kiln. Call 291-2900 for more 
Information. 

Cookie craze 

Three cookie seminars, designed for children 
aged 8-14, will be hosted by the Northbrook 
Park District the Leisure Center kitchen, 
3323 Wallers Ave., Northbrook. Chil- 
, dren can study and bake the latest, 
most delicious holiday cookie recipes 
on Wednesday evenings, Dec. 6, 13 
and 20 at 6:30 p.m. Most supplies 
provided by the Park Disi. For more 
Information, call 29 1 -2980. 



PUPPET SHOWS 

'KidsStuff marionettes 

The "KidsStufF performing arts series at Gor- 
ton Community Center, 400 E. Illinois Rd., Lake 
Forest, continues on Saturday, Dec. 9 from 2:30- 
3:15 p.m. with "Christmas Capers" performed by 
David Hcraog's famous marionettes. Tickets arc S7 
and the show is geared to pre-schoolers through 
3rd graders and their families. 

Interested participants should purchase tick- 
els in advanced. For more information, contact the 
Gorton Office at 234-6060. 

Hanukkah puppet show 

Relive the miracle of Hanukkah through the 
wonderful world of puppetry on Sunday, Dec. 10 
from 1 1 a.m.-l 2:15 p.m. at the Northwest Subur- 
ban Jewish Community Center, 1250 Radcliffc Rd., 
Buffalo Grove. The National Marionette Company 
presents "The Magic Top," a dramatic legend mix- 
ing tales of magic and history. Enjoy a special 
Hanukkah treat after the show. Price for members 
is $6 per person, non-members, SB per person. For 
more information, call 392-74 1 1 . 




MUSIC 



'Cherish the Ladies' 

The Irish traditional music and dance ensem- 
ble, "Cherish the Ladies," will appear in the Irish 
American Heritage Center auditorium, 4626 N. 
Knox Ave., Chicago, on Thursday, Dec. 7, at 8 p.m. 
Originally recognized as the first and only all- 
women traditional Irish band, they have won acco- 
lades as musicians and performers without peer. 

Tickets for the Cherish the Ladies Celtic 
Christmas Concert may be purchased by calling 
the IAHC office at (773) 282-7035. Cost is $15 ad- 
vanced, $20 at the door. 

Big Band Sound 

The Big Band Sound of Dccrfield will present 
two concerts at Northbrook Court, Lake Cook Dr., 
Northbrook. Listen to the sounds of "Latin Fantasy" 
onThursday, Dec. 7 at 7:30 p.m. "Holiday Serenade" 
will perform on Thursday, Dec. 14 at 7:30 p.m. The 
concerts will take place in the Lord and Taylor Court. 
For more information, call 945-5321. 

'Holiday Pops' 

Tlie Racine Symphony Orchestra and Maestro 
Alexander Piatt will present its annual "Holiday 



Pops" concert on Friday, Dec. 8, at 7:30 p.m. In 
Racine's Festival Hall, This year's concert will have 
a Russian theme and Include such favorites as 
Tchaikovsky's "Nutcracker Suite" and Prokofiev's 
"Peter and the Wolf." 

For more information or to purchase tickets, 
call the Racine Symphony Orchestra office at (262) 
636-9285. 

Famous Names 

Tlie North Suburban Symphony will present a 
Famous Names concert at the Gorton Center In 
Lake Forest, Sunday, Dec. 3 at 4 p.m. Graver Shlltz 
from the Chicago Symphony Orchestra will per- ' 
form as soloist on the English horn in Concertino 
for English Horn by Donizetti. Also featured will be 
FwffyeOwT/iire by Shostakovich, TiieSwan of 
Tuoncla by Sibelius, and Symphony No. 3 "Eroica" 
by Beethoven. Tickets arc $ 10 with a discount price 
of $7 for seniors and students. Call 604-6776 for fur- 
ther information. 

Choir joins chorus 

The Waukcgan Symphony Concert Chorus will 
be joined by the Greenwood Choir for lis holiday 
concert on Sunday, Dec. 3 at St. Anastasia Church, 
604 Douglas Ave., Waukegan, at 4 p.m. Under the 
direction of Stephen Dlackwelder, the Waukegan 
Concert Chorus will sing Britten's A Ceremony of 
Carols and Mcchcm's Seven Joys of Christmas. 

Tickets are SI 2 for adults, $10 for seniors, stu- 
dents and military. Children under 18 arc admitted 
free with paying adult. Call 3(50-4740 at the Jack 
Benny Center for the Arts or visit 
www.iickciwcb.com for tickets. 



AUDITIONS 



Bowen Park calls for talent 

Waukegan's Bowen Park Theatre Company Is 
casting for "Blithe Spirit," directed by Maggie 
Speer. The show opens in February and the com- 
pany is seeking women in their 20's-30's for the 
roles of Ruth, Mrs. Bradman and Edith. Also need- 
ed is a costume designer, set designer, lighting di- 
rector and stage manager. There will be pay. Call 
(312)409-4207 for information. Bowen Park The- 
ater is located at 39 Jack Benny Dr., Waukegan. 



THEATRE 




PM&L's 2nd show 

The delightful, warm-heart- 
ed comedy, "The Curious Savage' 
by Patrick Dennis, is in its final 
weekend at the PM&L Theatre, 
877 Main St., Antioch. Show 
dates are Dec 1-2 at Op.m. and 
Dec. 3 at 2:30 p.m. 
Reservations can be made by calling 395-3055 
or at the box office. Tickets are S 10 for adults and 
58 for students and seniors. Box office hours arc 
Mon.-Thurs. 530-7:30 p.m., Sat. 1 1 a.m.-2 p.m., 
and 1 1 (2 hours before curtain time on show dates. 

'Christmas in Oz' 

Twenty-eight young people ranging In age from 
7- 16 are in the cast of "Christmas In Oz," a musical 
fantasy by Val. B. Cheatham. The Waukegan Com- 
munity Players' production of "Christmas in Oz" 
will be presented on Dec. 2 at 3 and 6 p.m. in the Au- 
ditorium at Provena St. Thercse Medical Center, 
2615 Washington SL, Waukegan, 

The cast members are from the communi- 
ties of Waukegan, Grayslake, Great Lakes, 
Gurnee, Lake Forest, Lake Villa, Libertyville, 
Wadsworth and Zlon. Alt tickets arc $4 each. No 
reservations needed. For further information call 
662-0181. 

Musical for children 

Aladdin's magical adventures come alive be- 
fore your eyes in die production of "Aladdin" at the 
Marriott Theatre, running dirough Dec 30. Perfor- 
mances arc Mondays through Fridays at 10 am. and 
Saturdays at 1 1 a.m. Tickets arc $8 and available by 
calling the box office at 634-0200. Tlie Marriott 
Theatre Is located at 10 Marriott Dr., Lincolnshire. 

Continued on next page 



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P.M.& L. Theatre Presents 
Live! On Main Street 

Season XL 

Celebrating 40 Years - Exploring Love and Values! 

2000-2001 



The Curious Savage 




i 



A Comedy by 

John Patrick 

Permission granted by 

Dramatists Flay 

Service 

Directed by 
Tom Hausmin 



Nov. 17, 18, 24, 25, Dec. 1,2 at 8:00 P.M. 
Nov. 19, 26, Dec. 3 at 2:30 P.M. 

Box Office Opens Nov. 6lh 
Reserved Seating: $1 0.00 • Students & Seniors: $8.00 

Theatre Location: 

P. M. & L. Theatre 

877 Main Street • Antioch, IL 60002 

Reservations Call: (847) 395-3055 



Box Office Houns: 

Monday thru Thursday: 

5:30 rm. - 7:30 rm. 

Saturdays: 11:00 a.m. • 2.-00 p.m. 

ON PMVftMANCE DATES 
1 1/2 HOURS BEFORE CURTAIN. 





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Santa 7 s Brunch 

December 10th and 17th 
Brunch from 10am to 2pm 

Menu Includes: 





ALSO 

OPEN 

CHRISTMAS 

DAY FOR 

^SLBRUNCHI 



Carving Station 

Roast Heel" 

Horn 

Smoked Turkey 

Brunch 

Garlic Mashed Potatoes, Sweet Potatoes, 
Green Beans Almondine, Cranberry 

Sauce, Corn Bread Dressing, 

Herb Encrusted Chicken, Salad Bar, 

Champagne Cod, Potatoes Au Gratin, 

Scrambled Eggs, Hash Browns, Bacon & 

Sausage Links, Omelet Station, Waffles 

Desserts 

Pumpkin Pie, Apple Pie, 
Pecan Pie, Brownies 



Breol 



Bread & Rolls 



"\\OUjGUXXJ SwirX: gurnee 
6161 IV. Grand Ave. a 

(Ac mss (mm Oufficc Mlllsi 



To Make Reservations, 

Please Call (847) 336-6300 Ext. 3 



*12 05 for Adults 

$ 7 05 for Kids 
Kids 4 & Under Free! 




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December 1, 2000 



Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 5 



Continued from the previous page 

ICE SKATING 

Skating equipment sale 

The Northbrook Park Dlst. will hold a Skate & 
Equipment exchange on Saturday, Dec. 9 at the 
Sports Center, 1730 Plingsten Rd., Northbrook. 
Gently used hockey and figure skating equipment 
will be sold from 1 1 a.m.-2 p.m. 

Those who wish to sell equipment must drop 
off Items on Dec. 6 & 7 from 4-7 p.m. For more in- 
formation call 291-6876 or 347-0644. 

Skate for free 

The Waukcgan Park District is offering free ad- 
mission to recreational skate on Saturdays from 2- - 
330 p.m. at the Lake County Ice Sports and Fitness 
Center, 351 Oakwood Ave., Waukcgan, until Satur- 
day, March 31. Participants may bring their own 
skates. The free recreational skate is limited to resi- 
dents of Waukcgan only and proof of residency 
must be provided when obtaining skating passes. 
Posses are available at the Oelvidere Recreational 
Center, 4 1 2 S. Lewis Ave., Waukegan. For more In- 
formation, please call the Park District at 360-4700. 



COMEDY/SHOWS 

'A Nite in Vegas' 

Frank Pisanl, well-known Italian imperson- 
ator/comedian, will appear at Sabatini's restaurant, 
25250 W. Lake Shore Dr., Ingleslde, on Saturday, Dec 
2. Frank has opened for the Smothers Brothers, 
Randy Travis and many more. He is known for his 
impersonations of Libcrace, George Burns and oth- 
ers. For reservations, call 587-321 1. 

Dinner and a show 

A musical, comedic and theatrical celebration 
of the holidays and Frank Sinatra's birthday will be 
held on Dec. 9 from 7-10 p.m. at the Hob Nob 
Restaurant, at Rtcs. 31 and 14, Crystal Lake. David 
Paul as Frank Sinatra and Peter Oprisko as Dean 
Martin and Tonight Show comedian Mark Fenske 
will entertain at this dinner and a show evening. 
Cost is S35 per person, $60 for a couple and in- 
cludes dinner and entertainment. For tickets call 1- 
877-474-6287. 



SEMINAR 



Retirement planning 
for business owners 

The Small Business Development Center at El- 
gin Community College Is offering a course In re- 
tirement Planning for Small Business Owners from 
630-930 p.m., Monday, Dec 1 1, in the ECC Busi- 
ness Conference Center, 1700 Spartan Dr. Elgin. 
11iccostfsS35. 

Those attending will leam how planning for re- 
tirement can help small business owners pay less in 
income taxes and invest more of their earnings. 

More information or registration is available by 
calling the ECC Center at 622-3036. 



BENEFITS 



Accepting donations 

Now through Dec. 16, Community Trust 
Credit Union (CTCU) will be collecting new toys 
and Angel Tree Items in their Gurnee and 
Grayslake locations. Stop In and pick out a card 
from the Angel Tree or bring in a new toy for the 
Toys for Tots bin. 

On Dec. 16, members of the Marine Corps, 
along with Santa will be collecting gifts at the 
Gurnee branch, located at 1313 Skokic Hwy. San- 
ta's helpers will be accepting the donations at 
CTCU's Grayslakc branch, located at 1868 
Bclvidcre Rd. (corner of Rtc. 45 and Rte. 120). Call 
662-2050 for more information. 



Quilt Raffle 

The Fredrick School PTO has been donated a 
handmade quilt to help raise funds for the students 
and teachers of the school. The qulit, a queen/king 
size, features the colors of blue, teal and white and 
is valued at $2,000. Handmade and donated by 
Mary Smlolek, the quilt will be a on display at 
Fredrick School and the Grayslakc Library or can be 
seen in a color photograph at any school and many 
local businesses. 

Tickets are available at the Fredrick School of- 
fice or by calling Mary Smialek at 548-41 15; Raffle 
tickets ore $5 each or 3 for $10. The winning ticket 
.will be drawn on Wednesday, Dec. 13. 



NATURE 



Winter wildflower walk 

A wildllower walk In December? Sure! The 
flowers are still there. Join the Lake Co. Forest Pre- 
serve at the Lyons Woods Park, Rte. 137 & Blan- 
chard Rd., Waukegan on Saturday, Dec. 9 from 
130-3 p.m. Leam to identify wildflowers and dis- 
cover the superstitions and folklore associated with 
these plants. Cost is $4 (S3 for Lake. Co. residents) 
and registration and pre-payment Is required. 
Adults only please. Coll 968-3321 to register. 



HOLIDAY CRAFTS 

Cookie Walk 

Christmas cookies, crafts and other 
holiday items will be available for pur- 
chase at Prairie Crossings 4th Annual 
, Holiday Market and Cookie Walk 
at the Byron Colby Bam in Prairie 
Crossing, Grayslakc, on Sunday, 
Dec. 3 from 12-3 p.m. 
Along with the cookies, shoppers will 
be able to pick-up holiday stockings 
for their favorite pet, buy beautiful 
) cloth bags that makes a good recy- 
clable gift wrap or place an order 
, for a Longabcrger basket. Prairie Cross- 
ing Charter School will be selling poin- 
sett las and the Prairie Crossing 4- H Club 
will be o ffering bird treats to hang outside. 

Prairie Crossing is located one-half mile south 
of Rte. 120 on Rte. 45 In Grayslakc. Please call 548- 
5290 for additional Information. 

Make a candy house 

The Kenosha Public Museum, 5608 Tenth Ave., 
Kenosha, wiU hold a family "candy house" work- 
shop on Wednesday, Dec 6 from 6-8 p.m. and Sun- 
day, Dec. 9 from 930 am.- 1230 p.m. Using graham 
crackers, cookies, frosting, candy, gum and Imagi- 
nation. Design and construct a fantasy house fit for 
Hansel & Gretel. Call the Museum at (262) 653-4 140 
to register. 




SENIORS 



Holiday luncheon 

The Grandwood Park Community Center, 
36630 N. Hutchins Rd., Gurnee, will hold its Annual 
Seniors Holiday Luncheon on Sunday, Dec 10 from 
1-5 p.m. This years theme is "A Country Christ- 
mas" and features country & western singers, a 
dance troupe, door prizes and prizes for best coun- 
try costume/outfit 

Cost is $3 per person for residents, SlOper person 
for non-residents, and includes dinner, dessert and 
entertainment. Call 356-0008 to make reservations. 

Holiday party for Seniors 

The Grayslake Park District will offer an after- 
noon of good food, good company and entertain- 
ment for Seniors on Monday, Dec 1 1 from 12-2 
p.m. at the State Bank of the Lakes, 50 Commerce 
Dr., Grayslake. The lunch will be catered, entertain- 
ment and socializing and maybe a game of Bingo 
will fill die afternoon.- Pre-register by calllngThc 
Park District at 223-7529. Cost is $5. 



Bowen Park Theatre for young audiences 
presents 'The Chest of Dreams' 



This holiday season, sometime between 
hanging lights and baking cookies, make sure 
that you set aside some time to take your 
family to see Bowen Park Theatre for Young 
Audiences upcoming presentation of the 
'"The Chest of Dreams" by Max Bush. Direct- 
ed by Carolyn Applebaum, will be performed 
Dec 4-8, with showtimes at 10 a.m. and 1 
p.m. in Goodfellow Hall in the Jack Benny 
Center or the Arts, Bowen Park, Waukegan. 



This show caters to a younger audience, 
specifically children between the ages 6 to 10, 
but with its positive perspective on self-es- 
teem and the power of self-assurance it is 
sure to delight not only the young, but the 
young at heart, Tickets are $5 and can be re- 
served by calling 360-4741 at the center, 39 
Jack Benny Dr., Waukegan, or go to 
www.ticketweb.com. or visit their web site at 
www.waukeganparks, org/jbe. 



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You-know-who 
is coming to town 

Santa will be stopping by the Country Inn 
Restaurant of Lambs Farm to listen to kid's 
wish list just in time for the holidays. Fami- 
lies are invited to join Santa for breakfast 
on Saturday, Dec. 2, 9 and 16. Two seatings are 
available each day at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. 
The breakfast buffet is $9.95 for adults and $5.95 
for children ages 2 to 10. Children under 2 years 
old are free. 

After breakfast, everyone will want to visit 
Santa's secret Playland where each child will re- 
ceive a free goodie bad with a Beanie Baby. Enter- 
tainment will include music, coloring, letters to the 
North Pole and Lambs Farms' own Jo Jo and Kiwi the clowns. 
The kids can also enjoy sand art, face painting 
and photos taken with Santa. Prices per ac- 
tivity range from $1 to $3 each. 

All proceeds will benefit the vocational, residential and social 
support services provided by Lambs Farm for more than 260 
adults with developmental disabilities. Seating is limited and 
by reservation only for Breakfast with Santa. Call the Country 
Inn Restaurant at 362-5050 for reservations. 





Handel's 'Messiah' performed 

Good Tidings of Great Joy" will be brought to Antioch at 7:30 p.m. on 
Dec. 10 when the Antioch Community Chorus presents "The Messiah" 
by G.F. Handel at the sanctuary of St. Peter Roman Catholic Church, 
557 Lake St, Antioch. 
The yearly concert will be directed by Ralph Brooke from Antioch. Guest 
soloists are Jennifer Laymen from Waukegan, soprano; Cynthia Mace from Lake 
Forest, alto; Brent Billock, tenor and Alex Honzen, bass, both from Chicago. 
Chris Kusher from Grayslake, pianist and the Tim Montalvo string quintet will 
accompany the concert. 

"The Messiah" is presented by Festival Arts of Antioch which is supported 
by many businesses and individuals. Admission is free. For more information, 
call 395-1333. 






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F3 





Fine art gifts for 

Hundreds of fine arts by Lake County 
artists at affordable prices! 

Pottery • Wearable Art • Jewelry 
Paintings • Photography and more! 

College of Lake County 
Dec. 2-5 • Gallery Atrium 

19351 West Washington St., Grayslake, Illinois 
Call 847-543-2405 for information. 



Dec 2 
Dec. 3 
Dec 4-5 



9 am to 4:30 pm 
I to 5 pm 
9 am to 9 pm 



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LAKELIFE 6 



Lakeland Newspapers 




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December 1,2000 



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Charcoal Delights is located at 
500 Center St. in Grayslake, where 
the "Gourmet Burger" could be 
found before anyone was looking 
| for it, everyone strives to please 
each and every guest by serving 
the highest quality food in a mini- 

1 mal amount of time. 

At Charcoal Delights, the "char- 
coal barbeque broiled," is the star 
cooking process. Choose a juicy 
charcoal broiled 100 percent beef 
burger, or a delicious Vienna hot- 
dog served with all the trimmings. 
A Maxwell Street Polish sausage, 
or a Cheese Steak Delight will also 
please even the most discerning 

palate. 

The newest menu addition, a 
"broiled chicken sandwich" 
I served on a bran bun is a great 
j tasting way to eat healthy. 
I Freshly baked croissants and 
I some delectable fruit is a mar- 
I velous way to start the day. Italian 
Beef, Crisp Salads, and Chicken 
are just a few items on our cater- 
ing menu. 

Charcoal Delights is open 8 a.m. 

to 10 p.m., Monday through 

Saturday and from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. 

on Sunday. Eat in, drive thru or 

i carryouts are always available. 

I Call (847) 543-9838 for more infor- 

motion. 




Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 7 




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I ' 



December 1, 2000 



Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 8 



Re-telling of Dr. Seuss classic provides needed family film 



; 



The Christmas holiday is in 
full swing now that 
Thanksgiving is past, so let 
the movies begin. 
Ron Howard has a new holiday 
classic with "Dr. Seuss* How the 
• Grinch Stole Christmas." This re- 
telling of the beloved rhyme has 
more depth than the original. 

Perhaps a more appropriate 
name for the movie would have 
been "Why the Grinch Stole Christ- 
mas." In this new tale, embellished 
by Jeffrey Price and Peter S. Sea- 
■; man, the audience travels back in 
time to learn why the Grinch (Jim 
Carrey) is so grumpy and anti- 
Christmas, as told by a few charac- 
ters to Cindy Lou-Who (Taylor 
Momsen). 

Earlier in the movie, Cindy has 
a chance meeting with the Grinch 
and begins to wonder why no one 
wants to even mention his name in 
WhoviHe, She also begins to ques- 
tion the true meaning of the holi- 
day when she sees all the other 
Whos scrambling to purchase gifts. 
Her own father says to her, "This is 
what Christmas is all about (pre- 
sents). Can't you feel it?" 

The town is obsessed with the 
holiday, sounding off as each 
minute closer to Christmas passes. 
The music coming from the town 
j reaches the Grinch on Mt. Grumpit, 
which is the landfill on which he 
lives. It drives him nutty. Another 



movie review 




Michelle Habrych \ 




alternative tide for this film could 
have been "Ron Howard Lets Jim 
Carrey Go Nuts." The comic shows 
off his goofiness in a manner only 
he can. Carrey is quite possibly the 
Robin Williams for the 21st Century. 
Cindy interviews some key peo- 
ple who have been around Whoville 
and know why the Grinch is the 
way he is. Two women who found 
him as a baby share what it was like 
to raise him, and two schoolmates 
share their own point of view of 
what he was like. First, Martha May 
Whovier (Christine Baranski) recalls 
the 8-year-old green boy in her 
classroom on whom she had a 
crush. Augustus May Who (Jeffrey 
Tambor) tells how the Grinch was 
an outcast and the day he left 



Dr. Seuss' 
How the Grinch 
Stole Christmas 

Rating 

PG 

Director 

Ron Howard 

Starring 

Jim Carrey 

Anthony Hopkins 

Taylor Momsen 

Molly Shannon 

Jeffrey Tambor 

Verne Troyer 

Christine Baranski 




Whoville forever. 

Now mayor, Augustus attempts 
to squelch any mention of the 
Grinch, especially with the Whoville 
Jubilee approaching. Cindy wants 
to include the Grinch in the cele- 
bration and nominates him as 
Cheermeister for the festivities, get- 
ting the crowd's support behind 
her. What ensues is hilarious, lead- 
ing to the "stealing" of Christmas. 

The characters are fun to watch, 
and tiie costumes are a hoot! An- 
thony Hopkins weaves the tale as 
the narrator, adding a touch of class 
to the movie. And for those who 



Little Cindy Lou-Who (Taylor Momsen) meets The Grinch (Jim Car- 
rey) in Universal^ "Dr. Seuss' How The Grinch Stole Christmas." 



may be worried— there is not too 
much rhyming, though it does hap- 
pen and is funny when the Grinch 
realizes he's doing it. 

The true meaning of Christmas 
for the Whos is discovered after the 
Grinch takes all the presents and 
decorations. The happy ending 
brings a smile to your face as the 
Grinch's heart grows and he joins 
the Whos. 

Children will most likely love 
this film, and parents can feel com- 



fortable taking them, as there is lit- 
tle violence, no nudity (unless you 
count a big, green Grinch!) and 
minimal swearing (maybe a couple 
bad words). It's good to have a fam- 
ily movie that teaches that Christ- 
mas is about more than the "hustle 
and bustle" to get gifts and be mate- 
rialistic. Take a break this holiday 
season and see this movie. 

For its comedic relief, beautiful 
set and heartwarming tale, I give 
this movie four popcorn boxes. 



CRITIC'S CHOICE 



'In the Penal Colony' striking opera of horror 



Court Theatre broadens its 
horizons — and that of its 
play-going audience — 
with "In the Penal 
Colony," a new opera by Philip 
Glass based on a short story by 
Frank Kafka. 

Under the sharp direcdon of 
JoAnneAlaJaitis, this90-minute 
opera, performed without intermis- 
sion, uses a libretto by Rudolph 
Wurlitzer to tell Kafka's horrific story. 
The tale is set in an African pe- 
nal colony and features two strong 
singers — The Officer (played on 
opening night by Eugene Perry who 
rotates the role with his twin brpth- 
1 er Herbert Perry) and The Visitor 



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(John Duykers). Three non-singing 
parts are enacted by lose Gonzales 
as a marionette-like Kafka himself; 
Steven Rishard, the condemned 
man; and Alex Blatt, the guard. 

Onstage also are a string quar- 
tet, performing Glass's somber, of- 
ten-repetitious original score. 

Capital punishment is at the 
heart of this haunting work, which 
pits an automaton perfunctory 
blindly committed to a killing ma- 
chine designed to deliver unspeak- 
able suffering against an outside vis- 
itor asked to give at least tacit en- 
dorsement to the atrocity. But die 
Officer charged with meting out the 
punishment gets more than he bar- 
gains for. 

Set designer John Conkin's 
shrouded torture chamber, looms 
large, with its cruel gears and pierc- 
ing needles. 

"In the Penal Colony," which 
debuted in SeatUe, runs through 



Dec. 10. It will debut off-Rroadway 
June 6-July 15. Ticket information is 
available at (773) 753-4472. 




John Duykers (left) and Herbert 
Perry in a scene from Philip 
Glass' "In the Penal Colony." 



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Little Nicky 

There are a lot of ways to spend 
$20 million in this world. However, 
any average Joe could have probably 
made 10 films better than "Little 
Nicky" for the same amount of cash 
Sandler was given for doing this film. 

Adam Sandler plays the de- 
formed Nicky, one of the three sons 
of the devil, and is sent by his father 
to Earth to re- 
trieve his brothers 
because they are 
upsetting the deli- 
cate balance of good and evil by 
wreaking havoc on the citizens of 
New York. 

I am not sure which was more 
painful— watching "Utile Nicky" 
without leaving first, or Sandler 
having to keep his face in that same 
position for every scene. One pop- 
corn box. — Tim Frochlig 

Meet The Parents 

Between Ben Stillcr's average 
nice guy character with an embar- 
rassing sounding name Greg Fock- 
er, his girlfriend Pam Byrnes (Tcri 
Polo) whose only flaw is being sad- 
dled with an eccentric overbearing 
father Jack (Robert-DeNiro) and the 
rest of her family, and her hunky ex- 
beau Kevin (Owen Wilson), there 
are characters and situations in 
"Meet The Parents" to address 
every human insecurity. 

In spite of this common thread, 
some of the jokes in this movie tried 
a little too hard while others did not 
try hard enough. Some of the ab- 
surd situations would have been 
funnier if they had been pushed a 
little farther. Three and a half pop- 



NOW PLAYING 



corn boxes. —Julie Murphy 

Pay It Forward 

If you can't miss an episode of 
"Touched by an Angel" and you 
own your very own copy of "It's a 
Wonderful Life," you are the audi- 
ence Mimi Leder was seeking. Led- 
er doesn't miss a trick with "Pay it 
Forward," her adaptation of 

Catharine Ryan 
Hyde's novel 
about a young 
boy.who tries to 
change the world with an Amway- 
like scheme of good deeds. 

A sure-fire cast of three of the 
most commercially-viable and tal- 
ented actors (Kevin Spaccy, Helen 
Hunt, Haley Joel Osmont) make a 
valiant attempt to lift us up to a 
higher plane, but some obvious 
flaws, including a hackneyed script 
and heavy-handed direction, make 
this effort fall short of the Capra 
classic it wants to emulate. Three 
popcorn boxes. — Breneta Balin- 
Beitscher 

Remember The Titans 

Imagine "Dead Poets Society" 
on the football field with some 
racial tension and you've got the 
thoroughly inspiring "Remember 
the Titans." 

Based on the true story of a 
racially torn Alexandria, Va. in 1971, 
the movie focuses on T.C. Williams 
High School, forced to integrate. 
"Remember the Titans" is truly a 
feel-good movie. For blending dra- 
ma, comedy, romance, adventure 
and sports, Five popcorn boxes. — 
Michelle Habrych 



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~^~~~~ 



December 1, 2000 



Lakeland Newspapers 




LAKEUIEET9 






1, 






A weekend of 'Alice in Wonderland' 

The Children's Theatre at Barat College, Lake Forest, proudly presents Charlotte Chor- 
penning's adaptation of Lewis Carroll's "Alice in Wonderland," directed by Shawna 
Flanigan and featuring Genevieve Pritchard as Alice, Susie Anderson as the White 
Rabbit, Chris Neil as the Mad Hatter, Nikki Parker as Tweedledum, Eddie Beck as 
Tweedledee and Megan Wagman as the Red Queen. 

This enchanting tale il- 
lustrates Alice's journey 
through a backwards world 
and her struggle to find 
worth and friendship 
among the oddest and 
best-loved characters of 
Wonderland. Join us as we 
follow Alice down the rab- 
bit hole and into a strange 
new realm. 

"Alice in Wonderland- 
runs Saturday, Dec. 2 and 
Sunday, Dec. 3 at 1 p.m. 
and 4 p.m. each day. Tick- 
ets are $4 for all seats. All 
seats are reserved. To or- 
der tickets, or for more in- 
formation, call the Drake 
Theatre Box Office at 604- 
6344. 

The Children's Theatre at Barat College presents "Alice in Wonderland" Dec. 2-3, 
with, from left, Nikki Parker as Tweedledum, Genevieve Pritchard as Alice, Susie 
Anderson as the White Rabbit and Eddie Beck as Tweedledee. -Photo by Jennifer 

Girard 




HOROSCOPE 



CROSSWORD 



ACROSS 

1. Urban rodents 

5, Bvcnings 
(iibbr.) 

9. Siskel and 

' .critics 

14. Clapton, 

musician 

1 5. Tide 

16. Runs 

17. Coca-. 

I H. North-central 
Indian city 
HI. Vertical posi- 
tion 

20. Butterfly 
23. Child's com- 
mon guardian 
LM. Mediter- 
ranean and 
Caribbean 
25. Volcanic 
mountain in 
lapah 

27. Tormented 
hair 

32. Mother oflsh- 
macl 

36. A ihorny bush 
with plumlike 
fruit 

39. Queen of Sparta 

40. Dreiser's "An " 

43. Blue blood 

44. Sequent 

45. Native American watercrafl 

46. Mr. , head of "Mission Impossible" 

40. • Lanka 

HO. Sal l Like City state 

53. Coating for wood or metal 

56. 1900 Hutton film 

62. P.orticos 

63. Ancient Greek city 

64. Bedouin 

65. Oyster find 

66.MTVVThc World" 

67. Male lion's long hair 
60. Slang for fidgety 

69. Cow bam (British) 
70.&&& 




DOWN 



1. Go over 



31. 24 hours (Old English) 

32. Stringed instrument 

33. House servant 

34. Holds hereditary characteristics 

35. Plant part 

37. Liquefied natural gas 

38. Native American people 

41. Belts 

42. Grape 
47. Strictly 
49. Provide 

51. Harsh or corrosive in tone 

52. Bill and the Comets 

54. Small lizard of warm Old World regions 

55. Erin of "Happy Days" 

56. African antelope 

57. Brain divisions 

58. Egyptian sun god 

59. Water around a castle 

60. Listening devices 

61. Close by 

62. Resort or upscale beauty salon 

ANSWERS 



3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
21. 
22. 
26. 
28. 
29. 
30. 



Smell 

Lays clay 

Cause fear in 

Founds 

Star 

Gets possession of 

"Lostiri ," TV show 

Move on 

Hale- comet 



Fencing sword 

Buttocks 

Expression of disappointment 

City in Finland 

One who likes oats 

Narrow ridges (Swedish) 

Protoclist 

Came across 

Root of taro plant 




Aries- March 21 /April 20 
Your temper erupts when you learn that a 
loved one makes a mistake that gets you into 
trouble with a mutual friend. Don't stay angry 
for long, because you know that this person 
doesn't mean to cause you any harm. Just ex- 
plain the situation to that mutual friend, and 
he or she will understand. Leo plays a key 
role. 

Taurus-April 21/May 21 
You have your eyes set on a goal this week, 
Taurus, and don't let anyone stop you from 
reaching it. If you work diligently and avoid 
distractions, you're sure to attain it. A loved 
one turns to you for romantic advice. Be hon- 
est with this person, because he or she really 
needs your help. 
Gemini -May 22 /June 21 
Don't let a business associate sway your opin- 
ion on an important matter. You've looked at 
all of the pros and cons; you know where you 
stand. Resist this person's pressure. A close? 
friend needs a shoulder to cry on this week- 
end. Be there for him or her. Your concern 
will be appreciated. . 
Cancer- June 22/ July 22 
Your sense of humor wins you a new friend 
early in the week. Your remarks brighten this 
person's otherwise dreary day. So, get to 
know him or her better, because you two will 
make a good team. That special someone has 
a surprise for you on Friday evening. Enjoy, 
because you deserve it. 
Leo - July 23/August 23 
A loved one says something hurtful on 
Wednesday. Instead of keeping your feelings 
to yourself, share them with this person. Tel! 
him or her how upset you are. This honesty 
will go a long way in strengthening your rela- 
tionship. An old friend calls you out of the 
blue late in the week. Make plans to get to- 
gether. 

Virgo - Aug 24 /Sept 22 
You have a lot to juggle this week, Virgo, and 
several people are watching you to make sure 
that you can keep all of the balls in the air. 
Don't let the pressure get to you. Just work 
diligently, and you're sure to get everything 
accomplished. People will be impressed with 



your efforts. Capricorn plays an important 
role. 

Libra -Sept 23 /Oct 23 
A loved one turns to you with a problem early 
in the week. listen to what he or she has to 
say, and give your honest opinion on the mat- 
ter. Your input will be appreciated. A loved 
one offers to take you out this weekend. Say 
yes, because it's sure to be fun. 
Scorpio -Oct 24/Nov 22 
That special someone has a difficult day early 
in the week and takes his or her anger out on 
you. Instead of getting upset, try to under- 
stand. Help to make tilings easier for this per- 
son. While your efforts won't be appreciated 
early on, you'll be thanked later in the week, u 
Sagittarius - Nov 23/Dec 2 1 
Don't back down when an acquaintance 
challenges you late in the week. You know 
that you can win this disagreement as long as 
you stay focused and explain yourself clearly. 
So, that's exactly what you must do. Those 
watching will be on your side. A loved one 
needs your help with a family matter. Do 
what you can. 
Capricorn -Dec 22/ Jan 20 
Try not to be shy when you meet an interest- 
ing person on Tuesday, Capricorn. Just be 
yourself, and you're sure to make a good im- 
pression on him or her. The person whom 
you've been seeing wants to intensify your re- 
lationship. Think about what you really want 
before saying yes. Cancer plays an important 
role. 

Aquarius -Jan 21 /Feb 18 
When it comes to a financial situation this 
week, don't make any hasty decisions. Look at 
all of the pros and cons first Remember, the 
right decision could mean a serious windfall 
down the line. A close friend reveals his or her - 
true feelings for you. Let this person down 
gently. 

Pisces -Feb 19/March20 
While you would like to help a loved one who 
gets into trouble early in the week, don't You 
know that getting involved only will mean a 
lot of trouble for you. If you're asked, give 
your opinion. Otherwise, stay out of it 




For the local crafter, 
show visitor and collector - 

The Midwest Country Peddler has something for everyone 




From local exhibits and 

clubs to the larger shows 

and collectors societies, 

the Midwest Country 

Peddler gives you monthly 

updates of show listings 

and event details. 



For $24.95 for 12 

issues, the Midwest 

Country Peddler 

keeps you in 

touch with the 

things you want to 

see and do. 



•MIDWEST- 

COUNTRY 
PEDDLER 




•We Know Where You WW To Go.-*** HTwi You Short Be There" 



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LAKELIFE 10 / Lakeland Newspapers 



December 1, 2000 




Keep your water clean by using your senses 



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almost 100 gallons of water per day, giving the 
U.S. the highest annual water use per capita 
in the world. With all of this water use, you 
would expect, and hope, that your water is 



crystal clear. 

According to the Water Quality and Waste 
Management Department at North Carolina 
State University, tap water may come into 
contact with many different substances on its 
way to your home, leaving signs that may be 



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evident to the human senses . These sub- 
stances may not only give your drinking water 
a foul taste and odor, but they are unsightly ad- 
ditions to the fixtures in your home. White 
build-up known as lime is also an indicator 
you may have a problem with your water. 

While not all water contaminants are no- 
ticeably evident, it is possible to use your 
senses to identify certain substances in your 
water. Paying attention to the appearance, 
taste and smell of your water is the first step 
to improving its quality. Experts at the treat- 
ment system for Household Water Supplies at 
North Dakota State University offer the fol- r 
lowing tips to detect water problems: 
Eyeing Up the Problem 

If your water has an unusual appearance, 
either discoloration or a cloudy, foggy look, 
there may be a large number of organic or in- 
organic particles present in the supply. A fog- 
gy appearance may be common to homes 
that receive surface water from lakes, streams 
or ponds. If your water is reddish or yellowish 
when drawn from the tap, it's likely that it 
contains iron. 
Nose Out the 1120 Invaders 

Smells emanating from your water are 
also very good indicators of its content. A rot- 
ten-egg smell is a sign that there may be hy- 
drogen sulfide gas present in the water. An ex- 
cessively strong chlorine smell may be a re- 
sult of normal chlorination of public or pri- 
vate well sources. 
lasting the Waters 

Unusual tasting water is also a sign that 
there may be more than H20 running from 



the faucet. A metallic taste can indicate a high 
concentration of iron, manganese, or possibly 
other metals. Metals present in a water supply 
may also produce soda-like or salty water. 
Stained Sinks and Scale Formed Fixtures 
Human senses are not the only indicators of a 
foreign presence in your water. Household 
fixtures can also signal the presence of water 
impurities. White build-up known as lime 
present on sink fixtures and bathtubs may be 
caused by hard water. Hard water contains 
calcium and manganese, which contribute to 
the formation of this unattractive film. This 
build-up can be devastating to your bath- 
room fixtures by leaving household sinks 
stained, clogging showerheads and covering 
kitchenware with unsightly lime deposits. 
Clear Jug Water Contaminants 

Now that you can recognize various water 
contaminants, there are many solutions to 
help improve water quality, and in turn, taste 
and smell. One of the easiest solutions is the 
use of a filler. To help remove excess chlorine, 
the EPA suggests using an activated carbon 
filter. For iron removal and other mineral par- 
ticles, there arc filters available that fit on the 
end of sink faucets. These filters have pads 
that catch large particle chunks. 

Treating hard water in your home can be 
achieved by installing a water softener. Soft- 
eners replace calcium and manganese with 
sodium. If an expensive water softener is not 
in your budget right now, you don't have to 
continue living with the stains it creates. 
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December 1,2000 



Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 11 




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1 . Coffee additive 
3. To get older 

6. Finger joint 

7. Long period of time 

8. To want 
DOWN 

1 . Witch's laugh 

2. Halloween gear (plural) 

4. Follows 10 

5. Rabbit 




get th 
PICTURE 




new w 




One of two or more words 
that sound the same but 

mean different things. 
Example: PAIR AND PEAR 





A ■ - 

Science Fact 



WHAT IS FORMED WHEN TWO 
OR MORE ATOMS COMBJNE? 



a* 




Crossword 

fcrfam 3. Age 6. Knuckle 7. Eon 8. Yearn 

Down 

1. Cackle 2. Masks 4. Eleven 5. Bunny 



TIMELINE 




Science Fact: j 

MOLECULE i 

Get the picture?: TIRE : 

Did you know? • 

MICKEY MOUSE : 



What cartoon character made his debut 
in Walt Disney's film "Steamboat Willie," 
which was shown on Nov. 18, 1928? 

* In this year, Richard Warren Sears joined 
Alvah C. Roebuck to establish Sears, Roe- 
buck & Co. in Chicago, III. 

* William Wrigley introduces juicy fruit 
and spearmint to his chewing-gum ranges. 

* Poet and short-story writer Dorothy 
Parker was born in West End, N.,., on 
Aug. 22. 




Et**Wti*t* 



Tlie^i^SideSEprteReEoit 

NAME OUR MCTAURANT-CORIKX, 



ThePbmjria & Cafe At Rink Side Sports i Name:. — 
Needs A New Name ■ And We Need Your hel p.! Address: _ 

Win a fREE day of hro at Rink Side Sports > ■ 



loRnatlsts Will Receive 
Tickets To (tor New Yea fs 

Eve Party tortile 

announcement of the 

MHHERl 



* 5 public skate passes 

* 5 lazer tag passes 



* $30 Fun Card 

* 2 Large Pizzas and a Pitcher of soda 



City:. 



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^^^^^^^^^^^^B^^^^ 



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. ail Sports to nol ™por^ble^entrte detajed by Jlanerwul be io»ur.ced. JodiJes dectolons are 
I ar.d Invited to our New Year's Ere JK!**S5£JEE&5ii You may enler as many Una as 
. y^wtota.' iSS^^^^ ^SSX^^t * -*■ toe w!nner wPI be determined by 
I a random raffle. 



I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 



www.rinksidesports.com 



■— i 












# U(lnr*'J 



December 1,2000 



.«fi 



LAKELIFE 12 



Lakeland Newspapers 




I 

. ■ 

i 



i 
i 
i 



Floor covering Purchases of- $1,000 or more 






Floor Covering Purchases of $2,000 or more 

Must present coupon at time of order. Expires Dec. 18, 2000 
Not valid on existing orders, sale items or other promotions. 





o 




jaO.T'f 

We do it right the first time 
and back it for a lifetime 

© Liwiiti 






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II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 

II 

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II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

J B. 



Not valid on existing orders or sale items. 

Must present coupon. One coupon per customer. 

Expires Dec. 18, 2000 



fma its 




Just for Stopping In! 

(While supplies last) 

Must present coupon. One coupon per customer. 
Expires Dec. 18, 2000 





pr • ( 

JL 





ml 




i /iVrrrrr. 






Months Same As Cas 



We W ifcfc Mteif m 



<?&/*#>/« o> /a£& Coeintp fior 7~6>re>e, foxcr'at/oxs/ 



stores Price 




CAN 
S 







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O'Plaine 

(1 block) 




teHACSK] B[^^j0l. 



Q\\<* y 



4437 Grand Avenue, Gurnee, IL 

847-6 










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O 

o 



© 

Iskalis' 
American 
Floor Show 



; 



E-mail: djtiskalis@insnet.com 



Just 1 mile east of Gurnee 
Mills & Great America! 



~y -a; ' ''l 



^^^MK-~J.2!i-„. 



. • . iWSfanirJSi 







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For Your Health 

Winter can be a time of illness and 
injury if people fail to 
take appropriate health 
and safely precautions. 

Follow-sorne l 'P s 
from the Lake 

County Health 

Department/ 

Community Health 

Center on now to 

avoid some of 

winter's woes. 

Kids in the Kitchen 

Enjoy preparing for the holidays by 

finding quality time with your children 

while cooking holiday meals and treats 

Make memories that taste as good as 

they are fun. 



H d!M&^ Open Skate M Rink Side Sperti 



^i 



| December 2000/January 2001 I 


Gift 

Certificates 

make great 

stocking 

stuffers 


Mon. 18 

11:30-1:30 
1:45-3:45 
4:00-6:00 

8:30-10:30 


Tues. 19 

11:30-1:30 
1:45-3:45 
4:00-6:00 
6:15-8:15 

8:30-10:30 


Wed. 20 

11:30-1:30 
1:45-3:45 
4:00-6:00 

9:00-11:00 


Thurs. 21 

11:30-1:30 
1:45-3:45 
4:00-6:00 
6:15-8:15 

8:30-10:30 


Frl. 22 

11:00-1:00 
1:15-3:15 
3:30-5:30 
5:45-7:45 

8:00-10:00 


Sat. 23 

10:45-12:45 

1:00-3:00 

3:15-5:15 

5:30-7:30 

8:00-10:00 


Sun. 24 

11:00-1:00 
1:30-3:30 


Mon. 25 

CLOSED 

for 
Christmas 


Tues. 26 

11:30-1:30 
1:45-3:45 
4:00-6:00 
6:15-8:15 

8:30-10:30 


Wed. 27 

11:30-1:30 
1:45-3:45 
4:00-6:00 
6:15-8:15 

8:30-10:30 


Thurs. 28 

11:30-1:30 
1:45-3:45 
4:00-6:00 
6:15-8:15 

8:30-10:30 


Fri. 29 

11:30-1:00 
1:15-3:15 
3:30-5:30 
5:45-7:45 

8:00-10:00 


Sat. 30 

10:45-12:45 

1:00-3:00 

3:15-5:15 

5:30-7:30 

8:00-10:00 


Sun. 31 

11:00-1:00 
1 :30-3:30 
4:00-6:00 
7:00-9:00 


Hew Year's Day 1 

11:00-1:00 
1:15-3:15 
3:30-5:30 
5:45-7:45 

8:00-10:00 


Tues. 2 

11:30-1:30 

4:00-6:00 

6:30-8:30 


Wed. 3 

11:30-1:30 
4:00-6:00 


Thurs. 4 

11:30-1:30 
4:00-6:00 


Frl. 5 

11:30-1:30 

4:00-5:30 

Teen Skate 

8:00-10:00 


Sat. 6 

Kid Skate 
11:15-12:45 

1:00-3:00 

3:15-5:15 

8:00-10:00 



Ask 
about our New 
Year's Eve Par- 
tiesjor 
all ages! 



0/ 



fntortilnn*^ 



(847) 856-1 064 
At Gurnee Mills Mall 

between TJ Maxx and JC Penney 
Visit our website for more information 

www.rinksidesports.com ^"T^' 



.f. 

iti 



A New Arrival 



■i^H 




System to 



When a baby is born al Condell 
Medical Center, labor and delivery 
nurses play 10 seconds of Brahms' 
Lullaby. The song plays Iwice in a row 
for twins. 

"We'd heard about lullabies for 
newborns at other hospitals, and 
thought it would be a nice touch for 
Condell," said Jackie Lapetino, Manager 
of the New Life Maternity Center. "In a 
selling where illness and anxiety are all 
around us, a reminder about the new 
lives that come into the world each day 
is a good morale booster for patients, 
families and staff." 

In a place where it's common to hear 
urgent messages such as "Dr. ABC to 



the Emergency Department- stat" it's 
soothing to hear the gentle, digitally- 
produced lullaby once in a white. 

"In my department we have fun 
keeping track of how many babies are 
born throughout the day. Hearing the 
lullaby reminds us of the importance of 
our work at Condell," said Lynn Smith, 
a buyer in the Materials Management 
department. 

German composer Johannes 
Brahms wrote the melody in 1 868 for . 
the first child of Bertha Porubszky, an 
amateur singer in the ladies' choir he 
conducted. Several songwriters have 
written lyrics to complement the 
comforting melody. 



Here are the lyrics to the most traditional version: 

Lullaby and good night/Sleep is softly around you. 

While your dreams fill your eyes/With a melody of love. 

Close your eyes now and rest/May your slumbers 
be blessed. 

Go to sleep now and rest/May these hours be blessed. 



V^" --—'- 




f Hastings LakeYMCA 

20517 W. Grass Lake Road, Lake Villa 



847.356.4006 




December 9,2000 • 9 am till 11:30 am 

Join us for a wonderful Pancake Breakfast with lots of 
fine fixings!! Enjoy our great activities: Seasonal Arts 
& Crafts and Cookie Decorating. A picture with Santa 
for only $1 .00. $5.00 per person in advance; $6.00 
per person at the door. Tickets available Nov. 25, 2000. 

Winter Class Registration 

Hastings & Members Registration begins 12/9/00. 

Non-Members Registration begin 12/19/00 at 6 pm in person. 

Fees may be paid by cash, check or charged to Discover, American Express, 

Visa or MasterCard. To qualify for member rates for classes, your 

membership card must be valid through-out the entire season. 

Holiday Happenings Family Night 
Friday, December 15, 2000 • 6:45pm-1 0:00pm 

Activities include family games, arts & crafts, Inflatable Magic Island and 
Scuba Santa underwater tree trimming. 







Sponsored by $$£[$$$ 




Information on babies & toddlers 





Digital Lullaby 
e Newbor 




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THE RECIPE FOR A 
OUDAY SMILE & 
HOLIDAY SPIRIT 




At Hillcrest Nursing Center we 
like to get into the "Holiday 
Spirit" by decorating our 
residents doors. If you would 
like to decorate a door please 
contact Joel Crabtree at (847) 
546-5300. This year Hillcrest is 
teaming up with the Round 
Lake "Shop with a Cop" pro- 
gram for needy children. We are 
asking participants to bring an 
unwrapped gift valued at $10 
for a boy or girl. Visit us and 
see the "Holiday Spirit" in 
action. Door decorating 
is between December 1st 
& December 13th. Come 
join us in this festive 
holiday season. Our residents 
would love to see you! 




i 



? 



■ 




Hillcrest) 

nursing center jf 



1740 N. circuit Drive 
Round Lake Beach 

IL, 60073 

(847) 

546-5300 






2 Suburban Family • December 2000 




,.;;;■:- — ■ 



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SEE ALADDXtf'd MAGICAL 

MUSICAL ADVENTURES COME 

ALIVE BEFORE YOUR EVES.' 




NOVEMBER 15 - DECEMBER 30, 2000 



MCW 



7tas 



Wed 



Thurs 



Fri 



Sat 







Nov. 15 
10 am 


16 
10am' 


17 
10 am 


18 
11 am 


20 
10 am 


21 
10 am 


22 
10 am 


23 

Thanksgiving 


24 
11 am 


25 

11am 
1:30 pm* 


27 
10 am 


28 
10 am 


. 29 
10 am 


. 30 
10 am 


Dec. 1 
10 am 


2 

11am 
1:30 pm 


4 

10 am 
12:30 pm 


5 

10 am 
12:30 pm 


6 
10 am 


7 

10 am 
12:30 pm 


8 

10 am 
12:30 pm 


9 

11 am 
1:30 pm 


11 

10 am 
12:30 pm 


12 

10 am 
12:30 pm 


13 
10 am 


14 

10 am 
1250 pm 


15 

10 am 
1250 pm 


16 

11 am 
1:30 pm 


18 

10 am 

12:30 pm 


19 

10 am 

12:30 pm 


20 
10 am 


21 
10 am 


22 

10 am 
12:30 pm 


23 
11am 



25 
Christmas 



26 



27 
10 am 



28 

10 am 
12:30 pm 



29 

10 am 
1250 pm 



30 
11am 



*A11 proceeds from this performance will be donated to 
the Children's Miracle Network. 




Or 



For Yjung Audiences 

www.MarriottTheatre.com 



Reserve Your Tickets Today! 

CALL 847-634-^0200 

Groups of 15 or more 

CALL 84-7-634-5W? 






We request to put before you 

an. evening of royal splendor, 

spectacular dancing and 

captivating music. 

Tickets Are 
Now On Sate/ 

Reserve Your Seats! 

; 847-634-0200 

MarriottTheatre 




In Lincolnshire 



www.MarriottTheatre.com 





GO 








i 



F EATURE S 



Family Time 

Avoid materialism of the season 



^ For Your Health 
Be prepared for winter 

q Community Calendar 

Upcoming events for the family 

Q Family Feature 

Halloween safety tips & reader photos 

JQ Parent Time 
Dr. Singer 

Jl Kid's in the Kitchen 

Cooking up a memorable holidays 






Suburban 

Family 



NEWSPAPERS 



Suburban Family is a monthly publication for' families in Lake and McHenry 

County. Suburban Family is published by Lakeland Media, 30 S. Whitney 

Street, Grayslake, IL 6Q030. Mail can be addressed to that location, attn: 

Suburban Family. The magazine maintains a website, suburbanfamity.com 

and welcomes e-mail. To contact the Suburban Family staff call, 

847 : 223-8161 or e-mail editor@suburbanfamily.com or 

ads@suburbanfamity.com. 



Publisher • William H. Schroeder 

General Sales Manager • Robert Schroeder 

Operations Manager • Neal S. Tucker 

Editor • Rhonda Hetrick Burke 

Sales Staff • Toni Vincent 

Designer • Leslie Lipps 

Photographer • Leslie Lipps 



Suburban Family • December 2000 3 



Family Time 



Family projects & craft activities 



i 



Tis the Season for 

nt Mate 





How 




restore 




the meanin 



of the holidays 
to your 

■cirri 1 1 y 





Laura Ingalls Wilder's book, "Little 
House on the Prairie," details a pioneer 
Christmas when the gifts she received 
were a new tin cup, a stick of pepper- 
mint candy, a small heart-shaped cake 
made by her mother with white flour 
and sugar, and a shiny new penny. 
She wrote 50 years later "that was a 
happy, Christmas." My, how times 
have changed! Americans will spend : 
approximately $200 billion on Cnristmas 
gifts this year, which equals two-thirds 
of the entire defense budget or around 
$800 per person. So how have exhaust- 
ing trips to glitzy malls and pricey gifts 
changed the simplistic historical and 
spiritual aspects of Christmas into a 
materialistic celebration? 

Dr. Harvey Martin, professor of 
Christian education at Northwestern 
College in Saint Paul, Minn., offers 
some insight, beginning with the 
deconstruction of history itself. 
"Because much of history has been 
rewritten as propaganda, it's prompting 
people to question the history of Jesus 
and his birth," he explains. Also 
impacting the materialism of Christmas 
are destructive philosophies of the day, 
for example, "If it feels good, do it" 
and "You bring meaning to life." 

Another cause for the materialistic 
focus is disintegrating childhood. Chil- 
dren are having to make choices before 
they are capable. Parents are spending 
more money on them, but less time 
with them. They throw up values and 
let the children decide their own morals. 
Even organized play leaves no time 
for a kid to be a kief. It's all about 
competition, schedules and activities." 
Rampant consumerism is an obvious 
cause of materialism. "Retailers target 
kids," Martin says. "They know they 
can sell to kids via the parents who are 
more willing to spend money than time." 

So how can parents shift the focus 
away from the materialism. of Christmas? 
The key is balancing the head (facts), 
heart (emotions) and hands (involve- 
ment) of children, Martin says, 

"Christmas is an excellent 
opportunity to challenge children's 
creativity and imagination, a proactive 
approach as opposed to entertainment, 
which is non-active," he explains. Turn 
off the TV and read the Christmas story - 
from the Bible. Read the "Little House" 
books to give the children an idea of 
a pioneer Christmas to help them 
realize and appreciate how blessed 
they are today! 



To help children experience God, 
not just know of Him, and stimulate 
creativity and imagination, Martin has 
some suggestions for Christmas 2000. 

• Call a halt to gift giving as in the 
past. Instead of a family trip to the mall, 
use that time to make gifts for one 
another; parents should join in this 

gift making as well! 

• Set aside a family day for something 
special — museum field trip, volunteer 
at a community/church kitchen, visit a 
nursing home. 

• Instead of spending money on a trip 
to Disneyland that only entertains, 
spend the money on a short-term 
mission trip to help in poor areas of 
Jamaica, Bahamas or Mexico. 

• Use money normally set aside for 
Christmas gifts to outfit a disadvantaged 
family for the winter with coats, boots, 
blankets, even heating costs. 

• Volunteer to clean the house or 
do yard work for an elderly or single 
parent neighbor. 

• Write to missionary kids and send 
them creative homemade gifts and 
cards. 

• Stage the Christmas story — - Mary, . 
Joseph, shepherds, wisemen, and 
angels — with "actors" from the family 
or neighborhood. Use the Bible as 
the script. 

• Look for inter-cultural experiences 
in the community so your family can 
experience all the delights of diversity: 
music, culture, language, traditions, 
and history. 

Above all, Martin says parents need 
to take attention away from gifts by 
building relationships with children. 
"Help them realize that materialism is 
something to use, not to be abused or 
cause debt." The satisfaction of helping 
someone else is much deeper than an 
expensive gift. "This type of giving 
will also change your lives as welf 
as the lives of those you impact/' 
Martin stresses. 

Courtesy ofARA Content, 
www.aracontent.com, e-mail: 
info@aracontent.com. 4 



I 



' 



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. 



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4 Suburban Family • December 2000 



■*£'•'-■ '.* ', -,- * 



For Your Health 



Health cartissues & concerns 






. 






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; 



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ft 






; 




FOR YOUR HEALTH 

By Leslie Piotrowski, M.S. 
Communications Manager, 
Lake County Health Department 
Community Health Center 



. Winter brings many good things to 
mind, such as sparkling snowflakes, hot 
chocolate with marshmallows, arid 
snow-covered ski-slopes. But, winter 
can also be a time of illness and injury 
if people fail to take appropriate health 
and safety precautions. Following are 
some tips' from the Lake County Health 
Department/Community Health Center 
on how to avoid some of winter's woes. 

Colds 

Colds are the World's most common 
illness. More than 100 viruses can 
cause colds. While there is no vaccine 
to protect you, there are ways to lessen 
your chances of coming down with the 
illness. Keep the humidity up in your 
home since dry air dries out the mucous 
membranes in your 
nose and throat and 
causes them to 
crack, creating a 
place where cold 
viruses can enter 
your body. Wash 
your hands frequently 
and avoid contact 
with people who 
have colds. Build up 
your natural resisr 
tance by eating well, 
exercising andget- 
•ting -enough sleep. 

The Flu 

Influenza is an upper 
respiratory infection 
that can make per- 
sons of any age ill. 
Symptoms include 
fever, chills, cough 
and soreness, and 
aching in the back, 
arms and legs. 
Abdominal cramps, vomiting or diarrhea 
do not accompany influenza. In 
protecting yourself and your family, 
remember that hand washing is the first 
line of defense against the flu, alone 
with a healthy diet, getting plenty of 
rest, and avoiding crowds. The Health 
Department urges citizens, 50 years of 



age and older^ to obtain flu shots in 
anticipation of the flu season, which 
typically lasts from December to April. 

Hypothermia, 

Hypothermia can be fatal if not detected 
promptly and treated properly. It occurs ; 
when the body temperature drops to 95 
degrees or below. The most common 
victims are older persons who have 
difficulty keeping themselves or their 
homes warm in cold weather. Infants 
less than 1 year of age are also at risk 
because they lose body heat more 
easily than adults, and cannot make 
enough body heat by shivering. The 
condition usually develops over a 
period of time, anywhere from a few 
days to several weeks. Symptoms in- 
clude shivering, 
drowsiness, 
slurred speech, 
hallucinations 
and slow and 
shallow 
breathing. 
If you notice 
.Y2 these, sym'p- . 
-^toms ma 

Ke'rson, take 
is or her 
temperature. If 
it is 95 degrees 
F or below, 
call a doctor 
or ambulance, 
or take the 
victim directly 
to the hospital. 

Frostbite 

When spending 
long periods of 
time outdoors 
during cold 
weather, be alert for signs of frostbite. 
It initially occurs in the nose, ears, 
fingers and toes, and can happen at any 
temperature below 32 degrees F. Frost- 
bitten skin is whitish, and stiff and feels 
numb rather than painful. Children 
are especially susceptible to frostbite 
because they can become so engrossed 





^Bay - 

Billiards 




& SPORTS BAR 

107 Lakeland Plaza • Fox Lake 
(Rollins Rd. & Grand) 




847-581-8888 



HOURS: 

Mon;-Thu 3:00 pm - 2:00 am 

Fit 3:00 -3:00 am 

Sat 12:00 Noon - 3:00 am 

Sun. 12:00 Noon - 2:00 am 



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Weekly Pool Tournaments 

Mon. 8 pm 8 Ball • Thur. 8pm 9 Ball 

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•6'x 12' Snooker Table 

• 5 Electronic Dart Machines 

• Full Service Bar 
• Pizza -Sports Bar 

i 

[Pool Time *6%off; 

I After 7:00 PITI • Effective Till Dec 31, 2000 I 



in their play that they overlook 

discomfort. To prevent frostbite, wear 

hats that cover trie ears, scarves or 

masks to cover the face, and several 

layers of clothing to trap body heat. 

Mittens are better than gloves. 

To treat frostbitten skin, do 

not rub the area/since 

-friction can cause further 

skin damage. Warm 

the affected parts of 

the body with warm 

water for 20 to 40 

minutes. Wrap the 

frostbitten area fn 

blankets, sweaters, 

etc. Seek medical 

attention 

immediately. ♦ 








Little Lamb Christian Preschool 
36448 N. Fuller Road • Gurnee, IL 

847-360-9042 





We specialize in loving care. 
For information On the Summer 2001 and Fall 
2001 preschool programs. We have preschool 
& extended care, before and after school. 

We offer a country home environment 
that gives children room to grow. 



A home away from home. 





Suburban Family • December 2000 




December December 




T< ?Xi- 



430 Rt. 83 • Grayslake 





Come in and experience 

our wonderful world of 

toys and dolls! 



7c7 






Your Next Purchase. Add Expires 12/24/00. 
* Regularly Priced Merchandise 




1-31 

Festival of 
Lights 

Zion: Shiloh Park, 2828 
• Sheridan Rd. For times 
and more information, 
call 847.746.4012. 



3 

Great Lakes Toy and 
Collectable Snow 





Healthy Holidays and 
Wealthy New Year's Mead! 



Be A 'Free' Customer Or Earn $$$ From Home 





Shop Wholesale 30-40% Off 
800 Catalog / Internet Ordering 
Products Delivered To Your Door 
1 10% Back Account Earns You free 
Products', 

CAli, BY NOVEMBER 2tmi FOR FREE PRODUCT! 



$29.00 Start-up Fee 
120 Days Refundable 

• No Deliveries 

• No Paperwork 

• No Repeat Sales 
•No INVENTORY 

• Not an MLN or Party Plan 

• Risk Free! 



1&2 

Nutcracker 
Teas 

Long Grove: Seasons of Long 
Grove, 314 Old McHenry Rd. 

Reservations needed. For 

times and more information, 

call 847.634.9150. 



2, 9 & 16 

Dickens of a Holiday 

Libertyville: Cook Park, downtown 
Libertyville. Times: 10a.m.-4p.m. 
For more information, 
call 847.680.0336. . 



/^^7<ar\ 



Call Now & Get Check In December 
Call Demise At (847) 549-8637 




Grayslake: Lake County 

Fairgrounds; Rt. 120 & 45. 

Time: 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 

For more information, 

call 630.773,2635. 



.4 

Christmas Play 

AUDITIONS! for PM&L's 

Holiday Children's Show, 

Sprucy the Christmas Tree 

will be held at 7 p.m. the 

theatre, 877 Main Street in 

Antioch. Written by Anti- 
och's own Donna Abear; Di- 
rected by Gigi Wilding from 
Ingleside. There are roles for 

a girl and a boy ages 8-1 2 
and 6 adults of various ages. 
The play will be given 
Dec. 9, 10, 16,17. Info call: 847.973.1251 

4 • 

Healthy Holiday 
Snacking 




(Prunella 's 

^ftoiver Shoppe. 
(847)973-2343 

• fresh-cut arrangements 
for aii occasions 

• §ift items 

9&TI/ & Unique Tlush, 

Precious Moments 

• Wire flowers 
worldwide Slrraiujements 

21 W. Qrand Avenue 
(FoK.La^-IL 60020 




2, 3&16 

A.B. Cook 

Museum Victorian 

Christmas Tours 



up to eight 
idy 
registered dietfeian at Provena St. Then 



The average American can gain 
pounds during the holidays. W 



endy Piekarz, 



Libertyville: Cook Park, 

downtown Libertyville. 

For times and more 

information, call 

847.367.5857. 




discuss how to create lighter snacks for a 

healthier holiday season at the library from 7-8 

p.m. Samples will be provided. Registration is 

limited to 50 participants. Info call: 

847.356.7711 

9 

Breakfast with Santa 

Hastings YMCA Break- 
fast with Santa Time: 

9- 11:30 a.m. 

Seasonal arts & crafts, 

cookie decorating and 

pictures with Santa. For 

more information, call 

847.356.4006. 




! 



■ 



I 












I 



Is 



* 




Open a passbook 



savings account f 

today • 



Still available at 



cond Federal Savings 

& LOAN ASSOCIATION 



3960 West 26th Street 

Chicago, Illinois 60623 

773-277-8500 



2231 North Milwaukee Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 

773-292-9300 



2511 West Cermak Road 
Cicero, Illinois 
708-222-0400 









6 Suburban Family • December 2000 






■ 



November 24, 2000 










C2,/Lakeland Newspapers 



FAVORITE HOLIDAY RECIPES 



November 24, 2000 




NEWSPAPERS 



r. 



v 



Readers' Christmas 

Recipe Contest 

Winner 



J 




Congratulations to the 
First Prize Winner- 

Dolores A. Nick 

Prairie View 



^'■r She wins a VCR for 
this wonderful 
seasonal variation! 



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**-■«•» 



Your 



v-*:*'- 



FA VO*lTB HOUOAY 

lN A New KircHBN • 

' Remodel for 
the Holidays 

With Our 
Low-Fixed 

Bate Home 
Loan* 



r 

> 



STATE N 
_jBANK 

ROUND !>** 



lf irstStoteBo^ 
1 ofRound lx*» 



N^to^ Wy *?n YEARS 

jg» 0,» OUST ---SB-. 

Bound Lake »g&&e£l11 («1 Fax (847) 546 b 

Ph ° n f ^7)546-641 5 S^ |irsts tatefinancial.com 




Dolores A. Nick, 

First Prize Winner 

with grandson Sawyer 

Between a 
grandparent and 
grandchild, there is a 
very special tie that just 
keeps growing dearer 
as the days and years 
keep going by 



Christmas Cranberry Chicken 

1 3 lb. chicken, cut up 
1 cup flour, seasoned with 1 tsp. salt and dash of pepper 

3 tbs. butter 

1 15 oz. can whole cranberry sauce 

1 tbs. flour 

3 oz. water 

1/4 tsp. allspice 

1/2 tsp. salt 

1 tbs. wine vinegar 

• 2/3 cup brown sugar 

1/2 tsp. ground cloves 

1/2 tsp. cinnamon 



Preheat oven to 325°. Dredge 



WHEN THE BANK 

SAYS NO 

WE SAT TES 

INSTANT GASH! 



CALL TODAY - 
MONEY TODAY! 

1 5 MINUTE LOANS! 

NO CREDIT CHECKS! 



E 



ADVANCE OH 

PERSONAL CHECKS 



LOANS ON CM 
TTIUS-TOOKEEPTHECAfl 



RIAENVLA 

MONEY TRANSFERS 




•PAYDAY LOANS 

• POSTDATED CHECKS 

Se Habla Espanol 

RO UND LAKE TITLE LOA NS * 

839 W, floffru Rd. • Round Lake Beach 

(847) 546-5958 



chicken in seasoned flour and 
dust off excess. Melt butter in 
large skillet and brown chicken 
on both sides over medium, higtv 
heat, 5-7 minutes a side. 
Place chicken in 9" x 13" baking 
dish, skin side up. In the same 
skillet used to brown the chick- 
en, melt cranberry sauce and 
add remaining ingredients and 
bring to a boil. 
Pour sauce over chicken and 
bake for approximately 45 min- 
utes to 1 hour, un- 
til chicken is ten- 
der and 




(847) 546-8211 

1025 N. Cedar Lake Road - Round Lake Beach, JX 60073 _- 

•FLOWERS •GIFTS -CARDS •BALLOONS STUFFED ANiMALS -SILKS; 

•\PEDDING INVHATIONS -BRIDAL ACCESSORIES 

YEAR-ROUND CHRISTMAS ■ROpAL 

SERVING THE AREA SEVCE 1966 





<Fromour 

Peter Varghese ^Family to yours, 

9?0 E RoBns Rd. i_ - **■»!! -*„ 

Rand Ld<e Beadn have a *Happy 
847-223-7786 <Holiday Season. 



•••••• 



Roger R. Lutz 



AMERICAN FAMILY 

m:i I'lrvrrg. 



108 Center St • Gratpfeke C | W7 Arowicui hmlly Mutuil Inwnnn Company and its 
Downtown location since 197? Subildlirjej 

Q^J7-223~2888 Home Office-M*B»«t.VW 53783 
httpM^wwjmfarn.com 






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November 24, 2000 



FAVORITE HOLIDAY RECIPES 




German Cookie Pfeffernuesse 



Ellen Bywell, Lake Villa 




e& 



2 eggs 

1 cup sugar 

2 teaspoons butter or oleo softened 

1 teaspoon water 

2 cups flour 

2 teaspoons baking powder 
1 teaspoon cinnamon 
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg , 
1 /4 teaspoon cloves 
3/4 cup chopped raisins 



Icing- Wisk together 2 egg whites, 2 teaspoon light corn 
syrup a dash of cinnamon and 2 cups sifted powdered 
sugar until smooth. 



In mixer bowl, beat eggs until light - add sugar, butter and water, mix well. Sift flour, bak- 
ing powder and spices. Stir into other mixture. Stir in raisins. Shape into one inch. balls. Bake 
on greased baking sheet at 350 degrees for 10 minutes or until light golden. Cool on wire racks. 

Toss cookies, a few at a time in icing to coat. Place on wax paper for icing to harden or 
dust lightly with powdered sugar. Store in covered container up to one month. Gets better 
with age. 




Santa and Skyler 



The Sweetest gift of all 

Serve up holiday cheer with simple and delicious treats 



T 

was the night before Christmas— and all through the as Festive Apple Tart and Snow-on-the-Roof Pound Cake. Just 
« house all the people were stirrihg...and mixing and drizzlechocolate syrup and top with whipped cream to turn hol- 
whirring. Looking for a new twist for the traditional holiday iday treats into unforgettable indulgences. Or, create mouth- 
recipes? These quick-and-easy holiday entertaining ideas are , watering holiday drinks' and desserts like Chocolatey Mochac- 
sure to be the best gifts you'll give or receive this holiday season, cino and Yuletime Chocolate Pie, incorporating the rich choco- 
Adding easy-to-use Hershey's Syrup and Reddi-wip Real late taste of Hershey's Syrup and. the real cream goodness of 
Whipped Cream to your favorite holiday recipes is a convenient > Reddi- whip whipped cream for a tasty and decorative touch. 



fat-free flavor in seconds. Reddi-wip real whipped cream pro- 
vides a fun and convenient way to make scrumptious treats taste 
even better. Created more than 50 years ago, Reddi-wip has 
been a popular holiday staple at traditional family gatherings for 
generations. The combination of these two classic favorites cre- 
ates a taste sensation that even satisfies Santa's sweet tooth. 
So go ahead, put another Yule logon the fire and relax dur- 



and exciting way to enhance already great-tasting desserts such Hershey's Syrup comes in five delicious varieties and adds ing the holiday season with these great recipes. 

Snow-on-the-Roof Pound Cake 



• 1 8oz pkg. cream cheese, softened 

• 1/3 cup sugar 

• 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 

• 1/3 cup chopped red maraschino cherries 

• 1/3 cup chopped green maraschino cherries 

• 1 prepared pound cake 

• Hershey's Syrup 

• Reddi-wip Whipped Cream 

• Additional whole red and green maraschino cherries 



In a bowl, beat together cream cheese, sugar and vanilla until smooth. Stir in chopped 
cherries. 

Slice pound cake lengthwise into three slices. Spoon or brush a total of 4 tablespoons 
chocolate syrup over bottom and middle layer. Place bottom cake layer on serving plate; 
spread with half of cream cheese mixture. 

Top with middle layer; spread with remaining cream cheese mixture. Top with remain- 
ing cake layer. Cover, refrigerate until firm, about 1 to 2 hours. Garnish with Reddi-wip 
Whipped Cream and whole cherries. 

To serve, slice filled cake; place slice on serving plate. Drizzle with Hershey's Syrup and 
top with Reddi-wip Whipped Cream. 8 to 10 servings. 



Snow-Topped Chocolate Grasshopper 

• 1 cup whole milk 

• 5 cups vanilla ice cream 

• 1/3 cup white creme de menthe or 
1 teaspoon mint extract 

• Reddi-wip Whipped Cream 
• Hershey's Syrup for topping 

Combine milk, ice cream, Hershey's Syrup and creme de menthe in blender con- 
tainer, Blend until smooth. * 

Pour into tall parfait glasses. Top with additional Hershey's Syrup and a generous 
serving of Reddi-wip Whipped Cream. Serve immediately with spoon. 4 servings. 

Cheesecake with Chocloate-Peanut drizzle 

• 2/3 cup Reese's creamy peanut butter 

• 1 1/2 cups Hershey's Syrup 

• Fresh or frozen plain cheesecake, thawed 

• Reddi-wip Whipped Cream 

• Roasted chopped peanuts 

In small bowl, stir together peanut butter and Hershey's Syrup until smooth. 

Cut cheesecake into servings. For each serving, place cheesecake piece on serv- 
ing plate; drizzle with chocolate peanut butter topping and serve with Reddi-wip 
whipped Cream. Garnish with peanuts. 2 cups topping for 8 servings. 



THE RECIPE FOR A 

HOLIDAY SMILE & 

HOLIDAY SPIRIT 



At Hillcrest Nursing Center we 
like to get into the "Holiday 
Spirit" by decorating our 
residents doors. If you would 
like to decorate a door please 
contact Joel Crabtree at (847) 
546-5300. This year Hillcrest is 
teaming up with the Round 
Lake "Shop with a Cop" pro- 
gram for needy children. We are 
asking participants to bring an 
unwrapped gift valued at $10 
for a boy or girl. Visit us and 
see the "Holiday Spirit" in 
action. Door decorating 
is between December 1st 
& December 13th. Come 
join us in this festive 
holiday season. Our residents 
would love to see you too!! 



Hillcrest) 

nursing center ^f 




1740 N. Circuit Drive 
Round Lake Beach 

IL, 60073 

(847) 

546-5300 



■z=z=a^x^mm 



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— ^ 




QAfLakeland Newspapers 



FAVORITE HOLIDAY RECIPES 



November 24, 2000 




Holiday Chocolate Retfel Bars 



Readers' Christmas 

Recipe Contest 

Winner 



v 



j 



1 cup margarine 

2 cups brown sugar 
2 eggs 

1 tsp. salt 

2 tsp. vanilla 

21/2 cups sifted flour 
1 tsp. baking soda 

3 cups quick-cooking oats 



(Keep separate) 

1 15 oz. can sweetened condensed milk 
1 12 oz.pkg. semi-sweet morsels , 
2 tbs. butter or margarine 
1/2 tsp. salt 

1 cup chopped pecans 

2 tsp. vanilla 




• In a large bowl, cream together by hand margarine and brown sugar. 
Follow by hand-beating in eggs and 2 tsp. vanilla. In a separate bowl, sift 
together flour, baking soda and 1 tsp. salt. Stir oats into creamed mixture, 
followed by the dry ingredients. Stir until well blended. Set, aside. 

• In a heavy saucepan over low heat, 
melt together. condensed milk, semi- 
sweet morsels, and the remaining 
butter and salt. Continue stirring until 
mixture is smooth. Turn off heat and 
stir in pecans and vanilla. Set this 
aside. 

• Using a 15 1/2" x 10 1/2" x 1" edged 
cookie sheet, slightly greased, pat 2/3 
of oat mixture into the bottom of the 
sheet. Spread the chocolate mixture 
over the top of the dough and dot with 
the remaining oat mixture (use a 
spoon to make nice round dollops). 
Bake at 350° for 25-30 minutes. Cool 
and cut into squares. 

These holiday chocolate bars go very 
nicely with a steaming cup of hot choco- 
late while sitting in front of a crackling 
fire with family and friends! 

. They also freeze very nicely, too! 




GRAND OPENING! 

Hooterville 

Christmas Tree Farm 
(847) 395-4424 



at the Leider's Garden Greenery 
Annual Christmas Open House. 

Sunday, November 26 
10:00 am to 2:00 pm 

Refreshments & Door Prizes • Poinsettins & Christmas Cactus 

Christmas Arrangements & Centerpieces 

Handmade Gifts & Holiday Decorations • Fresh & Artificial Wreaths 

...And Lots Of Good Cheer! 




OPEN: Fri.-Sal.-Sun. Beginning Nov. 24th 
HOURS: 9am Mil 5:00pm 



Fresh-Cut Fraser Firs 
inside the Tree Barn* 
Wreaths & Firewood 
Bundles. 

Warm up by the Fireplace 
in Our Christmas Craft 
and Gift Shop. Visit with 
Santa! Ride the 
Haywagon! 

Stop by Mrs. Klaus' 
Kitchen for cocoa, cider, 
chili, hot dogs & more! 
Free Coffee! 



Pony Rides & Petting Zoo 

On Saturday Dec 2, llam-3pm 



KT.T7? 




InGrayslake 

On the comer of 

Rte. 8 3 and Lake Street 

(847)223-2422 




lElDERS 

GARDEN GREENERY INC 



HOURS: 
Mon.-Fri., 

9 3jtlio 6 p.m.; 
Sat & Sua, 

9aLm.to5p,m. 



I 



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f * 



OflAULWCCAD. 



WASHINOTOH 



WIHUHN 



CRAWDAVl. 



CL VHft 



V9* 



Located on N. Beck Rd., Lake Villa 

1/2 Mile W. of Rt. 45 off Grasslake Rd. 

Look for the Covered Bridge! 



Markyour calendar 

for That Christmas 

Feeling' 

Preparations are underway in Historic 
Cedarburg for That Christmas Feeling; a 
fine arts and crafts show December 1-3 
sponsored by the Cedarburg Junior Wom- 
an's Club. The annual show features die ju- 
ried work of 40 regional artisans along with 
wonderful raffles and prizes. 

This year artists will travel from four 
states to display their talents at the charita- 
ble event. In addition to enjoying an array 
of arts and crafts, shoppers can sample a 
light lunch or homemade snack at the Can- 
dy Cane Cafe. 

That Christmas Feeling is held in the 
Community Center Gymnasium, W63 
N641 Washington Avenue in downtown 
Cedarburg. the show runs from 10 a.m. to 
8 p.m. on Friday, December 1; 10 a.m. to 5 
p.m. on Saturday, December 2; and 11 a.m. 
to 3 p.m. on Sunday, December 3. A $3 do- 
nation will be accepted at the door. All pro- 
ceeds will benefit local and Wisconsin char- 
ities. Call 800-CDR-BURG for more infor- 
mation. 

The show is one of three holiday events 
being held in Cedarburg diat weekend, all 
within blocks of each other in the historic 
downtown district. Make a day of it — 
come to Cedarburg for That Christmas 
Feeling. 










i 






B 



.. 



5 f.' '•• 



i 



November 24, 2000 



FAVORITE HOLIDAY RECIPES 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C5 






i 



i 



i : 




Christmas Butter Cookies 

One of Destiny's favorie recipes 



1 cup softened butter 
1 cup sugar 

legg 

1 tablespoon milk 

1 teaspoon vanilla 

2-3/4 cups all-purpose 

flour 

1 teaspoon baking powder 

1/4 teaspoon salt 



Cream butter oradually add sutar and beat until light and Cut into desired shape. Place 1" apart on cookie sheets. 

'^t^^^^^^C^^^ t y^^ Bakeat350»for8-10minute S orunt,lhghtlybrowned.Re- 

powder and salt. Gradually add to creamed mixture. Wrap move to wire racks.to cool, 

dough and chill for at least two hours, Lightly Hour a pastry _ 

cloth and rolling pin. Roll dough to about 1/8" thickness. Yield:4-5 dozen 







Destiny Gebert, granddaughter of John & 
Barb Gebert, owners of Audio Experts & 
Communications of Fox Lake. 



i & BBSS Qi A "■ i _fil AfSili'ff A I 

IRHTING rESTIVAL 

tie Lighting Ceremony 
jhts With Santa 

Hot Chocolate • Caroling 

ring The Family! 




Call 223-6888 for more information 



Roger Jfc- 

108 Center Street 
Grayelake, Illinois ©0036; 
(847)223-2808 
Fax (847) 223-2890 



©1997 American Fumly'Muiiul Inwnwe Company jod ib SuWdiiria 
■.,-■■ - - - . HotneOIke -Madison, Wl 53783 

: bllpi/wwwjmramjcom 



Downtown Location Since 1977 



549 N. Route &$ 
Grayslake; 

847-223-0Q44 



toSTEBV 
ken@idstein.com 



tU 



EJ wvvw.ldsteincom '{ IL Residential Mortgage Licensee 

Lender * 

on One Sen/ice Since 1990 





Call In 
Carry Out 

"An American Original" 



Thank You For 
a Great Year! 

See You 
March 1st 




i||gg|| 



101 Center St. firayslake • 847-548-2770 
www.villagevision.com 





Cook & Carhop Positions Available 



Faux Finishes ^^^^/^S^^ ,-, Drapenes 
Furniture. - «l&l3&faWv Duvet Covers 
Custom Flbrais(;"/-^v:;r-, ; -.^^-^;::>/- Slipcovers 

DESIGN CENTER 

Wallpaper • labpc> Design * Gifts 

Home Accessories * Quorate ^Residential Design 

linens • Bedspreads 

(847) 543-8812 

Contact LwdaGossett For In-Home Com 
148 Center Street Downtown Grayslake 





Attorney, at Law 



ERSON 



Cllle 




LTD. 



Real Estate • .'Family law •Traffic/Criminal 

(847) 223-7010 

11 N, Slusser St., Grayslake 



Enrolled Agents & 
Certified I^bM^mmntants 

ACCOUNTING & TAX CONSULTANTS 

• IRS Representee 

• Fellowship NASA 

. Certified Qwcfcbooks consultant 

Serving the Conununity Since I960; 

^847^223-0777 

265 Center Street 
Grayslake, IL 60030 



VISA 




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Coupon 



Great Food! Great Fun! \ 



BUY ONi..Mi: OHE 



purchase One Dinner and get the Second Dinner 
of Equal otWvioaFREE! .. 

Master i felOJM 

■ ....-■,. ■■• v y-. j - -■■ r .'.A- * '*.* -."..>■■■ 



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129 Center Sfi; Grayslake 
(847)223-0082 



'rA^X. C?'£- *-.-**-*"* 



*«(ivCJ*te.iSiJ[ 




C6 /Lakeland Newspapers 



FAVORITE HOLIDAY RECIPES 



November 24, 2000 



'*:©^! 




Almond Horn Cookies 

Leslie Perry, Wauconda 

Almond horns are Christmas! Each year as I was growing up in a family of 
seven children, my mother made almond horn cookies. I knew it was Christmas 
when she made these cookies. She would make some as balls, because the 
dough would be so crumbly and hard to work with, but most were shaped into 
horns. Those were the ones made out of love. 

The smell of the almond dough baking filled the house with warm and won- 
derful feelings. I always remember my mom sprinkling the powdered sugar over 
the cookies when they came out of the oven. 

I know it is Christmas in MY house when I make the almond horn cookies, 
because it reminds me of when 1 was a little girl watching my mom make the al- 
mond horn cookies and anticipating the morning of Christmas. 



Almond Horn Cookies 



1/2 lb. butter 
2 2/3 cups flour 
4 oz. walnuts 
1/2 cup sugar 




Mix all ingredients together in 
a large bowl. Preheat oven to 
375°. Shape into horns and 
balls. Bake 15 minutes. Sprin- 
kle with powder sugar. 




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. o *ii<>"VA"^.^©^rT®f^°- ••"'• • 



1 IF YOU DON'T SEE SOMETHING YOU WANT, JUST ASK!! 

9g Catering 

We Love To Cater Parties! 

Please ask for Manager. Allow 4-5 days for Party Packages 
700 E. ROLLINS • ROUND LAKE BEACH 

740-1800 




A' La Carte Family & Party Trays 
New A'La Carte Ordering For Your Family And Friends 



Small Medium Large 

SERVES: 34 8-12 15-20 

Spaghetti $8,95 $17.95 $27.95 

Mostaccioli 8.95 17.95 27.95 

Baked Mostaccioli 10.95 21.95 37.95 

Rtgatoni 8.95 17.95 27.95 

Ravioli (meat/cheese) 11.95 23.95 35.95 

Lasagne . 13.95 26.95 47.95 

Italian Beef 7.00 14.00 28.00 

Italian Sausage 4.50 9.00 15.00 

Homemade Meatballs 4.50 9.00 15.00 

Salad Tray 4.25 11.25 17.45 
(Lettuce, Tomatoes, Cucumbers, Carrots & Green Pepper) 



Chicken Buckets 



Buffalo Wings 



8 pc. 

12 pc. 
16 pc. 
10 pc. 
15 pc. 
20 pc. 



Jumbo Fried Shrimp 

Sandwich Bread 

Garlic Bread 

Relish Tray 

Fresh veggies w/center dip (16' tray) 

Pastry Troy Connolis, Cheesecakes 

Serves 15-18 people 



$7.40 

11.50 

14.80 

6.25 

8.55 

11.10 

10.95/lh. 

.65 each 

1.25 

25.00 

$25.00 



LET US CATER YOUR EVENT 




, » >>".... ... 



Party" Packages 
Let Rosati's Prepare a Complete Meal For You! 



$4.95 



per 
person 



(Minimum 20 persons) 

Includes French Bread and Romano Cheese 

Choose one from each category 



MEAT 

choose one 
•Homemade Italian Beef 
•Homemade Meatballs 
•Italian Sausage 
with peppers 



CHICKEN 

choose one 
•Fried Chicken 
•Baked Chicken 
•BBQ. Chicken 



PASTA 

choose one 
•Spaghetti 
•Mostaccioli 
•Rigatoni 

'Ravioli (meat/cheese) 
•Baked Mostaccioli 
'Homemade Lasagno 



SALAD 

choose one 
•Potato Salad 
•Macaroni Salad 
•Cole Slow 
•Garden Salad 



Pizza Parties 15% discount on orders of 10 or more large size pizzas 

Sternos $1.00 each • Plastic Utensils 25* per person 

Delivery & set-up charge $5,00 • Prices subject to change without notice 




Santa's Little Elves! 

Skyler (on the left) and Spencer Szybkowski, Wauconda, enjoy their first 
Christmas. 



\ 



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from Sana's FMure Workshop 

Come in today and save on great hand-crafted furniture. 



ALL AT SPECIAL SANTA PRICES 



Bedroom 
Sets 



Dining 
Rooms 



Living 
Room 




Rockers 
Recliners 




Sofa 




Lamps 
Pictures 



Futons 



Centers 



• - 

' ■ '■:-■. 

Curio 
Cabinets 



Desks 






;• 






We will meet or beat the price on 

any competitor's ad or written 

quote on same merchandise. 



,jS^WJ^ay a 



* NIX'S OUTLET 
URNITURE STORE 

1020 Rollins Road 
Round Lake Heights 

847-546-7787 

All major credit cards accepted 
90 days same as cash 

9sxsaSi 





2000 



t^^BBMM^fflj^Hf-j 



November 24, 2000 



FAVORITE HOLIDAY RECIPES 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C7 







first 


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Karen Kuester, Fox Lake 



1 sleeve Keebler Club Crackers 

1/2 cup sugar 

1/2 lb. butter 

2-4 oz. sliced almonds 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, line a 
jelly roll pan with foil and then crackers. 



Melt butter oyer medium-low heat — add 
sugar and raise temperature to medium. Stir- 
ring constantly bring mixture to a boil and 
cook for 1-2 minutes. Spread oyer crackers us- 
ing a spatula, then sprinkle with almonds. 

Bake at 350 degrees for 11-15 minutes. 
Cool on rack for 10 minutes. 

Peel from foil, breaking crackers as you go. 

This is an easy and quick recipe that I've 
shared for the last couple of years. I don't al- 
ways wait until the holidays either! 




Lime Cheese Cake 

|udy Neeve, Lake Villa 

2 1 /2 cups grab an i cracker crumbs 

1/2 stick butter 

1/4 cup sugar 

Melt butter and mix with sugar and crumbs. 

line bottom and sides of spring-form pan or 9"xl3" pan. 

1 can evaporated milk (well chilled) 

1 8 oz. cream cheese (room temperature) 

ipkg. IhneleJJo 

1 cup boiling water 

2 teas, vanilla 
1/2 cup sugar 

• Whip chilled milk for 3 minutes, until fluffy, store in refrigerator. 
Soften cream cheese and sugar and vanilla. 
Dissolve Jello in boiling water. 
Let cool. Do not let it set. 

Add jello to cream cheese mixture, fold in whipped milk. 
Pour in crumb-lined pan. 
Chill. 




Christmas Crackers 



1/2 cup butter or margarine, melted 

1/2 cup honey 

1/3 cup light brown sugar, firmly packed 

2 large eggs 

2-1/2 cups whole wheat flour ,- 

1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour 
1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder 
1/2 teaspoon salt 

3 tablespoons sugar 



In large bowl, with wire whisk or fork, 
beat margarine or butter, honey, brown 
sugar and eggs, just until blended. With 
spoon, stir in whole-wheat flour and re- 
maining ingredients except sugar. Divide 
dough into 3 balls. Wrap 2 balls in plastic 
wrap; refrigerate until ready to use. Preheat 
oven to 350°. On floured large cookie sheet, 
with floured rolling pin, roll remaining ball , 
of dough into rectangle slightly larger than 
15" x 13". Trim side to make 15" x 12" rec- 
tangle. Using dulledge of a knife, score rec- 
tangle lengthwise into 3 strips; score each 



strip crosswise into 5 rectangles. Decorate 
center of each rectangle by pressing fa- 
vorite holiday cookie cutter into dough, 
making sure not to cut all the way through. 
Sprinkle with 1 tablespoon sugar. Bake 8- 10 
minutes until. edges begin to brown. Cool 
on cookie sheet on wire rack 2 minutes; 
slide onto rack to cool completely. Repeat 
with remaining dough and sugar. When 
cool, break each large rectangle into 15 
smaller rectangles along the scored line. 

Yield; 45 crackers 





RENTAL CENTER, Inc. 

205 L Rollins Rd 38975 N Lewis Ave. 

Round Lake Beach, II 600 73 Beach Park, 1L 60099 
<S47) 546-7844 (847)623-1100 




IN 



Professional w , . ^ (ort \tt\i*i»»**Ai .w<P iW ' 



546-J84 






v aco u<op v,\crt* s ' \\\ LAfcCoui^^ 
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Reserve Early For The Holidays Santa 

Suits, Tables, Chairs, Linens, Food 

Warmers, Coffee Pots & More! 

Call For Free Brochure 



Proudly serving Lake County 

Since 1976 Q 



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" c MOST V. 

COlkgE^Y 



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r System 




3^r- tl POSSIBLE y 7ZMS&&&- 

^Va6-8055^^^V^7 



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CS/LakelandNewspapers 



', > ' trii *~% tits :■;' ^ 47 1 * f Wi "~"-:-~" rs r i* ? 3 ~ 

FAVORITE HOLIDAY RECIPES 



November24]2Q00 





These area merchants invite j^u to bring your Holiday 

Shipping list to them for everything you 11 need during 

the gi&giving season. Stop by and enjoy the convenience 

and charm of our downtown Grayslake shopping district. 







,: 



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Faux Finishes , «3 I ^V^ISS^ ^P^" 
Fumiturc yfrTVaO^^ DuveL Co\trs 
Custom Florals S^M Slipcowrs 

DESIGN CENTER 

Wallpaper • Fabric • Design • Gifts 

Home Accessories • Corporate • Residential Design 
linens* Bedspreads 

. (847) 543-8812 

. Quito! Unk Garni k In-Worn Qmkim 
148 Center Street, Downtown Grayslake 
Unique gifts available! ,- 



& Open: Thurs. 10-8 «M,Tu,,W,F 10-5 • Kf 
X K Sat 11-5, Sunl4 r- 





Coteltarter'KiBectiiantileJnt. 

MERCHA NTILE 

1 41 Center Street 
Grayslake, IL 

(847) 548-9315 

Mon. & Tues. - Closed 

Wed. & Thurs. - 11-6 

% Fri. - 11-7 ■ Sat. 10-5 ■ Sun. 12-5 >\ 




K Phone: 847-548-2003 SUH9 VC 



HOURS 

MON-THURS 11-10 

FR1 11-11 

SAT 9-11 




HUPYOUftPfl 
LOOK HIS 




Great gifts for 

you and your 

furry or 

feathered loved 

ones 



Canine Clippers 
& Pet Supplies 

250 Center Street Grayslake, IL 
(847) 223-5444 

Closed Sun. & Mon. 
Open; Tues,, Wed., Fri., Sat. 8-5:30pm 
^ Thursday 6 pm 



www.TheCottageHouse.com 



Here is a recipe for a dec- 
orative, scented potpour- 
ri that blends traditional 
fragrances of the season. 
Ingredients and amounts 
suggested can be adjust- 
ed according to your own 
creative sense. 



• 1 quart fresh evergreen needles 

• 10-20 small pine cones 

• l cup whole bay leaves 

• 3 cups holly, sassafras, oak, 
magnolia or orange leaves 

• 3 cups dried orange peel 

• l cup cinnamon sticks 

• 1/2 cup whole cloves 

• 1/2 cup juniper berries 



Ait'nBl 



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ooms, 



- FteFWDesgB 

- [Med Edm Pats 

- Custom Frarrhg 



2W Center 
888-20^879 

W I W, F 9-5:30 

Open fete Th 9pm 

Sat 94:30 





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Children's Specialty Shop 

131 Center St. 

Iimtran Grayslake 

223-6005 

Hours: Honday-Frtday u-G>; 
Saturday 10-5; Closed Sunday. 





%**£-Sf; i **l£3j£pi 





Preparing this potpourri af- 
fords an opportunity for holi- 
day fun for the entire family. It 
is easy to make, and many ingredients 
can be gathered from the backyard or 
on a family outing to a nearby woods. 
A two-foot bough will yield several 
quarts of needles. To remove the nee- 
dles from a fresh bough, use large 
scissors and work over a deep; wide- 
mouthed bowl, cutting the needles off 
close to the stem. If you allow, the 
branches to dry for a week or so, you 
can easily strip the needles off by 
hand. 

Holly contributes immeasurably 
to the color and texture of this Christ- 
mas Potpourri. Tree leaves are a de- 
sirable addition and can be used fresh 
or dry. Crush about half of them 
before mixing and add the rest 
whole. If you can find them, add 
whole bayberry leaves for fra- 
grance and texture. 

This holiday potpourri';: 
makes a thoughtful and origi- 
nal gift. For presentation, fill a 
basket decorated for the occa- 
sion or a Christmas stocking, 
simply fashioned from red or 
green net, machine-stitched 
along the sides and tied at 
the top with a Christmas^fibr^ 
bon. 





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November 24, 2000 



FAVORITE HOLIDAY RECIPES 



Lakeland Newspapers / C9 





Open a Free Checking Ac 



* No Minimum Balance * No 1 

*FREEiffM 



* FREE Fkst Orieg Of Checks 
* FREE Direct Deposit 



Drive-ilp 
Hours 

Mon. - Fri. 
8:00 AM -7:00 PM 

Saturday 
8:00 AM -1:00 PM 



: 





AND CET A COMPUMnHARY COPY OF 

"Ji'&a Wonderful £ife 

When you open a 
Chocking Account 

Just bring in this coupon when opening your account 




COMMUNITY MINDED CORNER 
TTE 12 & GRAND AVENUE • FOl 




CAf H ITSIIOH* 



EQUAL HOUSING 

LENDER 





7~§8 




fT~7 




311 




$100.00 to open a checking account, 

1. Special fees such as overdraft charges may apply. 

2. With our ATM card only. Foreign proprietary fees may apply. 

$250.00 to open a savings account. New accounts only. 

This offer is non-transferable. - 

A service charge may apply to any account closed before 90 days 

OFFER EFFECTIVE 12/4/00 




~^£ 



C 1 / Lakeland Newspapers 



I 



FAVORITE HOLIDAY RECIPES 






J&*- 



November 24, 2000 



November 24; 2000 



FAVORITE HOLIDAY RECIPES 



■ Lakeland Newspapers I C 1 -T 





Awarded 2nd Best 
Nail Salon in Jhe Country! 
Full Sets -*45°^ 



New Okait Only 



Gift 



Hoipilol mode disinfectant. *& vjiii *& 
Mon. 9-3 ► fuei., Wed., Ihun. 9-9 -5? Certificates' 




Fri, 9-7 > Sal. 9-3 

No MA! 

Awesome Nails 

143 Center St. • Grayslakc, IL 

(847) 543-9300 



Available 



e Sure to Have 
ar Serviced at 





i Well help you qef '300,000 mites oiilofyaurcan 

We Specialize in Chrysler Products 



'Ml Toys for Tots 
!fij5 Drop-Off Center" 

Hft Complete Automotive Services tlJSl 

,;-:,: «Wo Repair "Check Engine* Lights StSt 




HI* 

MS* 
MS* 

MS' 




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airfield Material & 
Supply Company 

Landscape Supplies • Material Sales 



Premiere 



Ice Melter 
With Pro-Tec Plus 

• Will Not Damage Leather Gloves & Footwear 

• Less Corrosion To Concrete and Metal 

• Creates Instant Traction 

• Attacks Ice and Snow Quickly 

• Does Not Contain Calcium Chloride 

• Contains Anti-Caking Agents 

10 N. Fairfield • Round Lake 
(847) 740-3203 



ive a 

Great Lakes Credit Union 
Membership 

All those who live or work in Lake County 
can join. Enjoy high-yield savings, low- 
cost loans, Internet Banking and more! 

Call or Stop by for Details. 

Great Lakes Credit Union 

(847) 578-7000 • 1-800-982-7850 

www.glcu.org 





ottest game of 
the new Millennium? 
Raging C hampions 




wmhm Bttf h i4m»*wA*Ij^ & 

— *. *• fW Ml mi ■*§! - <** 







Exciting family game for 5 
years and older. Choose your 
characters and the tourna- 
ment begins! Only m/w. 

BAM-JAC 

enterprises, inc. 



To place your order: 

Call toll free: 1-860-BAM-JAC1 

Fax US: 1-B47-356-6187 

On the uieb: 

Raging Charnplons.com 



Have Repairs Got You Down? 

Let Jerry's Ingleside Citgo Take The 
Worry Out Of Your Holiday Travel. 





CITGO 




Jerry's 

INGLESIDE^ 
Corner of Rte. 134 & Wilson Rd. 

(847) 740-9181 

1 .'With Any Service Work 



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,.4i 



El Rancho Motel 

Happy ; Molidays^ 
S aimdy <£k Mattt 

Twenty One Units In Beautifully Wooded Area 
Close To Great* LiokG!» , & Gurnee Mills 
Kitcheriettoa >ih$o HBO & ESPN 

eWceklyjRat^ajAvaHable 
Rancho 





$23-5237 H 



Located At Intersection Rto. 41 & Rte. 21, Gurnoe 



NEWSPAPERS 



lewsoaoei 



Lbcaf Editicins^ 
Covering Your Town 
r or Over 45 ^earsll 



L* 




AZ 



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. fi*- 









NEWSPAPERS \ 
223-8161 
30 S. Whitney, Grayslake j 



Skopek 

RTHODONTIC 

For Your 





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V-i 



Skopek Orthodontics 

or Nofth lUxrln(ii)n 
444 Norlli Ilanil Hoai! 
Village Ituik and Trmt BulldbiR k ^ . vfljfr 

North llurrbifilon, IllumU 60010 P~** B -J 

Please call us at (847) 277-1212 for more information. 



Happy Holidays 
From Your 

'ersonal Power Profession 





1-800-686-3637 
www.power-now.com 



mi t 




derin 
Mountai 

Indian Hand Craft 

Native American Unique Gifts, 
Crafts, Art, Jewelry, Supplies, 
and Much More! 
Native American Owned and Operated 

Lay-a-way plan available • Major Credit Cards Accepted 

Store Hours: Wed. 12-6, Thurs. & Fri. 12-7, 

Sat. 10-5, Sun. 1-5, Closed Mon. &Tues. 

E-Mail: wlb99@megslnet.net 

3452 - 5E Sheridan Road 
Zion, IL 60099 

(847) 746-5797 







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"•>&' TC' ^L^ 



^t^ 



l^ffyviCE Great Gifts 



Scrubs ♦ Shoes ♦ lab Coats 

Warm Up Jackets 4 Sport Scrubs 

Stethoscopes ♦ Dlood Pressure Sets 4 Aprons 

Vests ♦ Pants ♦ Tuxedo Shirts ♦ Skirts 

Blouses ♦ Food Service & Chef Apparel 



ACCEIT UN 




505 Orchard Street • Antioch 

847-395-4570 

Store Hours: Wed&Fri. 11am-5:00pm, 
Thursday 11am-6:30pm and Sat. Wam-2pm 



girls in glasses 




get framed by 




MfTKy/ Tata Cannir L»ftabtt\ }{*>, 



101 Center St. 

548-2770 , 

Voiwttpwn fytuystuKe 
luiviv.viUuyevhioH.com 




auconda 
Park District 




Tree Lighting Ceremony 

December 1 , 2000 

6:15 p.m. Festivities Begin 

6:30 p.m. Tree Lighting 

6:45 Peace Pledge at Village Hall 

6:45-8:30 p.m. Visit with Santa 

Ceremony will take place 

at Memorial Park 

Chamber of Commerce & 

Village of Wauconda 




Lake County's Premier Doll, Stuffed 

Animal, Miniaturei.and Figurine 

shopping experiencre. Xll. major 

brands available 

and 

the Little Ones are invited to make 

their wish lists here as we are. 

"Authorized Elves" to fill Santa's 

sleigh for our children. 

6695 West Grand Ave, • Gurnee 
(847)855-0004 




COUPON 



COUPON 



$ 2 00 on?i $ 3 00 off: 

14" or 16" Pizza ! 18 M Pizza 



new Merita Cm^m Via. Oriofaf. 
OmtCt^mtaKaM. 



I 

I 

llndu rif nWWntOtiaht I 
OMCHpiaPanaa. 

I 
I 
I 

821 Center St., Grayslake'«_(847)_548- JAKE ' 
{H.<tToptj W wijji,). gj^-Edi (5253) ' 



(JAKE 'S P IZZA) 





7amitty Re&dmy 




^<^uvU43NWBvi^ 



Eafch Month In Your 
V ^Local Lakeland Newspape r^ 



^/ "J? w' 






out 

Get your photo greeting cards 
next day! 

SAVE 15% 

WITH THIS AD. 

Rose 

IMAGING 

34409 N. Old Walnut Circle 

Gurnee, Illinois 60031 

847/548-6200 





Processing ■ Custom Framing * Digital Reproduction 



Hours: 

M-F7-6 

Sat 8-12 

Sun. By 

Appt, 



24 Years Experience! 

Family 

Owned 

And 

Operated 




Auto * Truck • Small Engine Repair*] 



Major Credit Cards Accepted 

777 Belle Plaine St • Gurnee, IL 60031 
24 Hour Towing • (847) 623-0010 

Wishing You Happy Holidays! 
Elmer, Betty, Ashley, Rachel, Christina Fallos 



it "4*' v. - - 







Flags & Flagpoles 



. • 



Ho | id ay G if t Id ea e? 

Tola rid Art t<'Garder\ Flaqe 



Stop in or check us out on the web! 

*fe 1224 North Ave. $j& 
m Waukegan, IL 60055^ 

547-623-3524 www.kflag.com 

■ > 



Lambs 
Preschool 

Nmr accepting applications tor Spring of 2001 




A Christian atmosphere designed 
specifically for your 3, 4 & 5 year olds 

• Morning 3 year Olds - 2 Day Program 

• Morning 4 year Olds - 3 Day Program 

• Afternoon - Pre-K Program (5 Yr. Olds) 

n and 



Trinity Kids Klub 

School Age Children 
Before & After School 

6 am - 6 pm 

For more info please call 546-1044 
25519 W.Hwy 134, Ingleside 




$m& 







EALHOLIDAYSAVINGS! 

DINETTES! BAR STOOLS! 

OV«rta YK&fTQti ering Lowest 
Prices! Largest Selection 



HUGE SELECTION 

Or BAR STOOLS AND CASUAL 

1 DINING FURNITURE ' 



• Custom Umlwttd Tables Plus 

CORUS". Cmmlc Tile, Oil, CU« anJ Cnniic 

• Custom Built Comer Nooks. 




"CHROMCRAFT" 

A Cht\»m* raft/RrvlrwtiHi CotttiHttlY 



FREE DELIVERY 



FAST AND LOW COST 

REUPI IOLSTTERY SERVICE AS ALWAYS 



BIAND DINETTES 

Established 1972 

1611 H. Rand Road • RL 12 (Rand) and Rl. 68 (Dundee) • Palatine 

Phono (847) 358-1414 

www.randdlneRcB.com 
| Man. & Tues. 1 0-fl:3Q; Wed. 10-5:30; Thurs. 4 Fri. 10-8:30; r. "« 
J Sat. 10-51 Sundays 1 1-5 • FREE DEUVERY ' k *l 



Saddles, Statues, 

Sweatshirts & Silver 




■ 



Great Selection of 

Gifts for the Horse 

Lover You Know! 

• (including yourself!) 

Timmermann's 

Ranch Er Saddle Shop 

Check it Out! 

29550 W. Roberts, Island Lake 

526-8066 




i 










OUI TODAY - MONEY TODAY! 

MO CREDIT CHECKS! 

15 MINUTE LOANS! 



ADVANCE OtM 

PERSONAL-' 

CHECKS 



LOANS ON CAR 

TITLES — YOU 
KEEf* THE CAR 



CHECK 
CASHING 



RIA ENVIA . 

MONEY 

TRANSFERS 



PAYDAY LOANS - POSTDATED CHECKS 

ROUMP Utffi TH1JE °L0flH5 

839 W. Rollins Rd. • Round Lake Beach 

(847) 546-5958 



HI iiifiiiiiif \mmm 





Antioch News, Fox Lnke Press, Grayslake Times, 

Guinee Press, Lake Villa Record, 

Liberlyville News, Lindcnhursi News, 

Mundelein News, Round Lake News, Wadsworlli News, 

W auconda Leader * 

NEWSPAPERS j 




ip on Over to 




€) A T^P whistle Stop Cafe on 
iLiii j o y° ur wa ^ *° s ^°pp' n 9 

for the holidays. 



'0mMm 



A warm friendly atmosphere, Railroad Decor, and a 
Variety of Delicious Home Cooked Foods including: 

• Authentic Mexican Food • Fresh Baked Items 
Children's Menu • Specialty Coffee Flavor of the Day 



15 E. GRAND AVENUE • FOX LAKE 




S3 



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C 1 2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



FAVORITE HOLIDAY RECIPES 



November 24, 2000 




Nov 



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Novembers, 2000 



FAV °BgS-aS! J?AY > ^fc e to^iV g ^p g r5/G13 



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#*»«•■ 



Hot Chocolate Espresso 



!&&&* 



£5>"* 



Sandy'Adams, Mundelien 




Ingredients 

1/2 cup strong hot coffee 
1 to 3 teaspoons sugar (optional) 
1/2 cupcreahi, or 1/4 cup half-and- 
half and 1/4 cup milk 
1 1/2 teaspoons unsweetened cocoa 

whipped cream 

1 tablespoon mUk chocolate, grated 

cinnamon stick 




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C 1 A/Lakeland Newspapers 



FAVORITE HOLIDAY RECIPES 



November 24, 2000 



i 






1 



•'i 



Ingredients: 

1 fresh or thawed frozen turkey (about 12 pounds) 

2 teaspoons salt 

1/2 teaspoon black pepper 

2 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted 

Your favorite stuffing recipe, or Wild Rice, Bacon, 

and Onion Dressing 
Or instead of stuffing: 
2 medium yellow onions, 1 peeled and left whole, 

1 peeled and quartered 
2 medium carrots, peeled and quartered 
2 medium stalks celery, cut into chunks 
4 sprigs parsley 
2 whole bay leaves 

Giblet Gravy 

This simple recipe is guaranteed to produce a juicy, 
golden-brown bird. 

Makes 12 servings 
Preparation time: 30 minutes 
Roasting time: 4 hours 

Step 1: 

Preheat oven to 325°F. Remove giblets and neck from turkey 
and reserve for gravy. Rinse turkey inside and out under cold 
running water drain well and pat dry with paper towels. 



CI as si c 
Roast Turkey 



Step 2: 

Rub neck and body cavities with salt and 
pepper. If using stuffing, spoon loosely into 
cavities and truss (see How to Truss a 
Turkey). If not using stuffing, place whole 
onion in neck cavity. Place carrots, celery, 
quartered onion, parsley, and bay leaves in- 
side body cavity, then truss. 

Step 3: 

Place turkey, breast-side-up, on a rack in 
a large roasting pan, brush with butter, and 
tent loosely with foil. Lift foil and baste gener 
ously with pan drippings every half hour. Roast 
until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the 
meatiest part of the thigh but not touching the bone reg 
isters 180°F to 185°F, about 4 hours. 



Step 4: 

About30 minutes before turkey is done, remove foil and baste 
again. When turkey is done, transfer to a heated platter and let 
stand while you make gravy. Remove vegetables and bay leaves 
before serving. 

Nutritional Information 
1 serving with gravy: 
Calories 348 

Saturated Fat 2g 
Total Fat llg 
Protein 50g 
Carbohydrate 2g 
Fiber 2g 
Sodium 527mg 
Cholesterol 
152mg 

■ Courtesy from 

Kitchen Secrets 



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U'Jili-= 







November 24, 2000 



FAVORITE HOLIDAY RECIPES 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C 1 5 




Holiday Cooking 

Better baking begins with a few basic tips 



r 



A few basic tips can help you bake the kind of holiday cookies people 
are likely to go bananas over. 

That's twice as true with a recipe for Basic Banana Holiday Cookies. The 
firsttip: Always read through the recipe so there are no surprises. Assem- 
ble all ingredients and equipment, prepare the pans, set oven racks in the 
.right position and preheat the'oven before you begin mixing. Also: 

• Stick to sticks. Never use the whipped style of butter or margarine since it 
contains too much liquid. Professional bakers prefer urisalted butter. 

• Measure accurately. Spoon unsifted flour into the right size measuring 
cup and level off with the straight edge of a knife or metal spatula. Measure 
granulated or brown sugar in the same way, but press regular brown sug- 
ar lightly into the cup. 

• Use shiny metal pans or pans with a non-stick finish. Dull, darkor enam- 



el pans ma/cause uneven and excessive browning. Reduce oven temper- 
ature'by25 degrees F. if you are using glass or porcelain-coated aluminum 
pans with non stick finish, 

• If baking several batches of cookies,- let baking sheets cool between batch- 
es. 

• Wait until the minimum baking time has passed before opening the oven 
to test. Wait until cookies are completely cool before storing in an airtight 
container, or they will soften. 

For the following Basic Banana Holiday Cookies recipe, you need an ■' 
extra-ripe banana to get the right level of sweetness and soft texture. The 
banana should have a speckled or even a very dark peel. If bananas reach 
that point before you are ready to bake, puree or mash them and store in 
an airtight container in the freezer until you're ready to bake. 



^ 



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A 



1 

P 



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Basic Banana Holiday cookies 

Prep: 15 minutes 
Bake: 12 minutes 
Makes: 4 1/2 dozen 

2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour 

1 teas, baking soda 

1/4 teas. salt. , 

1 cup margarine, softened 

1 1/4 cups granulated sugar, divided 

1/4 cup packed brown sugar 

legg 

1 large, ripe baiiana, mashed (about 

1/2 cup) 

1/2 teas, ground cinnamon 

• Combine flour, baking soda and salt in medium bowl; set aside. 

• Beat together margarine, 1 up granulated sugar and brown sugar in 
large bowl until light and fluffy. Beat in egg and banana until blended. 
Stir in flour mixture until combined, cover and refrigerate 2 hours or 
overnight until dough is firm enough to handle. 

• Combine remaining 1 /4 cup granulated sugar and cinnamon in small 
bowl. 

• Shape dough into 1-inch balls. Roll in cinnamon mixture; place two 
inches apart on ungreased baked sheets. 

• Bake at 350 degrees F. 10 to 12 minutes or until lightly browned. Care- 
fully remove cookies to wire rack to cool completely. 

variation — Chocolate Banana Stars: Prepare, shape and bake dough 
as directed above except roll dough in 1 cup finely chopped almonds in- 
stead of cinnamon mixture. Immediately after baking, press unwrapped 
individual milk chocolate pieces into center of each cookie. Cool as di- 
rected. 






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C1 6 /Lakeland Newspapers 



FAVORITE HOLIDAY 
RECIPES 



November 24, 2000 



Reindeer Treats 

Cindy Jankowski, Antloch 
Here's a delicous treat to leave for Santa's reindeer on Christmas Eve. It's also a deli- 
cious treat for you! Eat it with milk and honey. Or use Reindeer Treats to make Reindeer 
Crunchies (beiow). ! . 

Here's what you do: - > 

1) Measure and mix together the following: j£, 

• 1 cup bran cereal ^ y 

• 1 cup raw oats ' 

• 1/2 cup raisins 

• l /2 cup shredded coconut 

2) Mix well. 








Reindeer Crunchies 

Here's what you do: 

1) Stir 2 cups of Reindeer Treats with 1 12 cup peanut butter. 
Mix well. 

2) Place the mixture in the refrigerator for 15 minutes, so the in- 
gredients will cool and harden a bit.^ 

3) While waiting, cut apart the pretzels. Each pretzel makes 2 
reindeer antlers. Don't worry if you break a few. Making the 
antlers takes a little practice. 

4) Remove the mixture from the refrigerator. Shape a spoonful 
into a bail to look like a reindeer's head. 

5) Put raisins where the eyes and nose go. 

6) Push the "antlers" into the top of the head. 

7) Keep the Reindeer Crunchies in the refrigerator until you're 
ready to eat them. 

••Here's an extra Idea: Add a red candy nose to one of 
the reindeerl 










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November 24, 2000 



FAVORITE HOLIDAY RECIPES 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C 1 7 




Orange Praline Yams 



Marie Reilly, Grayslake 



4 lbs. of yams, cooked, peeled and sliced 
2/3 cup of orange Juice 

1 tablespoon grated orange rind 
4 tablespoons of brandy 

2 teaspoons of salt 

1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper 
1 teaspoon ground ginger.. 
1/2 cup butter, melted 
1/3 cup brown sugar 

3 egg yolks 



^Topping 
2/3 cup brown sugar 
1/2 cup butter, melted 
1 cup chopped pecans 
1 teaspoon cinnamon 





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MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED 




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Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees 

In a mixing bowl, beat the yams until smooth. Mix in the remaining casse- 
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all the topping ingredients in a small bowl, sprinkle over the yams. At this 
point the casserole may be covered and refrigerate overnight. 

Bake uncovered for 45-50 minutes or until golden brown and bubbly. Let 
stand for 10 minutes before serving. 






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.^>— - — - '"— - 

- ■ 



018/ Lakeland Newspapers 



FAVORITE HOLIDAY RECIPES 



November 24, 2000 



Not 




Christmas Gingerbread Bowl & Cookies 

1. In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter and sugars until fluffy, molding it firmly to the shape of the bowl without stretching it.Trim 
about 1 minute. With the mixer running, add the molasses, corn the dough around the edge of the bowl with a sharp knife, then, us- 




Recipes from Karen Smith, 
s Lindenhurst 



syrup, vanilla and eggs, one at a time, 
beating until the mixture is well com- . 
bined. In another large bowl, combine | 
the remaining ingredients with a | 
whisk. 

2. Add the flour mixture gradually to j 
the creamed mixture (the dough will | 
be very stiff and you may have to use 
your hands to get all the flour worked 
in). Divide the dough into quarters 
and wrap each in plastic wrap. Chill 
overnight. 

.3. Cover the outside of a 1-1/2 quart 
ovenproof glass 6owI with a lipped 
edge with aluminum foil, bringing the 
foil over the edges to the inside. Make 
sure the foil is on very smoothly. Spray 
the entire bowl with vegetable cooking spray and set aside. 
4. On a floured surface, roll 1 /4of the dough into a circle 1 /4" thick. 
Immediately lift the dough and press it onto the outside of the bowl, 



1 cup un salted butter, softened 
3/4 cup dark brown sugar, packed ' 
1/2 cup sugar 
1/3 cup molasses 
3/4 cup dark corn syrup 

2 teaspoons vanilla extract 

3 large eggs 

8-1/2 cups all-purpose Dour 
1 tablespoon baking soda 
1 teaspoon salt 
1 teaspoon cinnamon 
1 teaspoon ground cloves . 
1 teaspoon ginger 
1 teaspoon orange extract 
1/2 teaspoon allspice 
1/2 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper 



ing a small star-shaped cookie cutter," cut out 
stars around the lipped edge of the bowl, 
about l-l/2"-2" apart and about 1-1/2" up 
from the bottom of the inverted bowl. Re- 
frigerate the bowl for 1 hour to firm up the 
dough. 

5. Preheat the oven to 350°. Place the invert- 
ed bowl on an ungreased baking sheet and 
bake 20-30 minutes, or until lightly browned 
and firm to the touch. Allow the gingerbread 
to cool on the bowl. When cool, carefully 
loosenthe foil and lift foil and gingerbread 
shell off the bowl. Peel away the foil and dis- 
card; store the shell, uncovered, in a dry 
place away from the humidity of the kitchen. 

6. Use the remaining dough to make 3 more 
bowls, or cut with decorative Christmas cut- 
ters into cookies. Bake the cookies on a lightly greased baking sheet 
for 8- 10 minutes, oruntil they are lightly browned. Yield: 'I bowls or 
1 bowl and 6 dozen small cookies 



Christmas Tree Cookies 

These are sturdy enough to be made into ornaments. 

1 stick margarine or butter 

1/2 cup shortening (butter-flavored) 
2 cups sugar 

2 whole eggs 

2 teaspoons vanilla 
4 cups self-rising flour 

Cream together butter/margarine and sugar. Add eggs and vanilla and mix. Add flour 
and fonu 2"-3" balls. Flatten with hands andplace 6 to a cookie sheet. Bake at 375" about 
15 minutes. 

Frost with icing made from 1 lb. confectioner's sugar and 4 tablespoons meringue pow- 
der (available from Wal-Mart or cake decorating department). Make holes for hanging 
while the cookies are still warm or hot from the oven. 



Christmas Angel Cookies 

The cream cheese gives these cookies a smooth texture, while the fruits 
sparkle and sweeten the flavor. Nice for using candied fruits that did- 
n't make it into the fruit cake. 



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NU-DIAMOND 

GLASS CO, 

39 S. ROUTE 12 
FOX LAKE 

SHOWROOM ON ROUTE 12 

ACROSS FROM MCDONALD'S 

Fax No.: (847) 587-2241 



for the Holidays 

CUSTOM 
HEAVY GLASS 
ENCLOSURES 



P 



TOLL FREE 

1-800-255-0340 

(847) 587-2226 



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1/2 cup shortening 

1/2 cup cream cheese, softened 

1 cup light brown sugar, firmly packed 
1/2 cup granulated sugar 

2 eggs 

3 cups flour 

1/2 teaspoon baking soda 
1/2 teaspoon salt 

1 tablespoon vanilla 

2 cups candled fruit 

2 cups broken pecans or almonds 



Preheat the oven to 350°. 



In a large bowl, cream shortening and cream cheese until smooth and fluffy. Add sugars and 

eggs, mixing well. In a separate bowl, sift flour, baking soda and salt together. . 

Add flour mixture to egg and sugar mixture; add vanilla. Mix well. Add candied fruit and 

nuts. 

Drop by rounded spoonfuls onto lightly oiled cookie sheet and bake for about 10-12 min- 
utes. The cookies will be just browned at the edges. 

Hint: You may have to mix the fruit and nuts in with your hands; a little shortening on your 
fingers will keep the mixture from sticking. 
Yield: 3 dozen 



Christmas Ribbons 

1-1/2 cups butter, softened 
1 cup sugar 

1 tablespoon baking powder > 
legg 

2 teaspoons vanilla 

1 / 2 teaspoon lemon or orange extract 
3-1/2 cups all-purpose flour 
Red and green food coloring 

Beat butter in a large mixing bowl.with an electric mixer on medium speed for 30 seconds. 
Add sugar and baking powder and beat well. Add egg, vanilla and lemon or orange extract. 
Beat until well combined. Beat in as much flour as you can. Stir in any remaining flour with 
a wooden spoon. '■ 

Divide dough into three portions. Tint one portion pink with a few drops of red food 
coloring and one portion light green with a few drops of green food coloring. Leave the re- 
maining portion plain. Do not chill dough. * 

Pack dough into a cookie press, placing pink dough on one side, green on the other, and 
plain in the center. Using the ribbon plate, force dough through press onto ungreased cook- 
ie sheets. Cut into 2"-3" lengths. 

Bake at 375° for 6-8 minutes or until edges are firm but not brown. Remove cookies and 
cool on wire racks. 
Yield: 5 dozen 



. . ■ - 



Dr. Antonio A. Ghua Lee 

363 N. Main St., Wauconda! 

Specializing In Internal & Geriatric Medicine 
Primary Care and 
internal Medicine . 
Practice 



Over 20 years 
or caring experience 
with another location 
In IibertyvQIe 

Board Certified 
in Internal Medicine 
and Geriatrics 

Adults and children 
ages 7 & op 









Medicare assignment 
accepted , 

• Managed care & 
traditional health 
insurance plans 



735 S, Milwaukee n lib •Libertijville 

(847) 367- 1755 

TUe*. 9-6 • Thurs. 9-6 
VtL 0-6 * Sal. 9-2 



363 N. Main • Wauconda 

(847)487-9573 r 

Man. 1-6 
WEBSITE: www.achualec.com 






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I 



November 24, 2000 



FAVORITE HOLIDAY RECIPES 



Lakeland Ne 




Herb-Crusted Leg of Lamb 






This year r try lamb. thee 
recipe jmniQ 



Stepl: 

Preheat oven to 450°F. In a small bowl, combine parsley, rosemary, thyme, 
mint, oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper. 
Step 2: 

Place lamb, fat-side-up, on a rack in a shallow roasting pan. With a small, 
sharp knife, cut twelve 1/2-inch-long by 1/2-inch-deep slits, 2 to 3 inches apart, 
in the top of lamb. Insert garlic slivers into each slit, pushing them into meat. 
Step 3: 

Spread herb mixture evenly over lamb. Insert a meat thermometer in center 
of meat, making sure it does not touch bone (or test later with an instant-read 
thermometer). 
Step 4: 

Roast, uncovered, 15 minutes. Reduce heat to 350°F and continue roasting, 
uncovered, until thermometer registers 145°F for rare or 160°F for medium. 
Step 5: 

Remove from oven and let stand 15 to 20 minutes before carving. 



Orange Eggnog Punch 

This traditional holiday beverage gets fresh sparkle and flavor from the addition of 
ginger ale and orange juice. 



Ingredients 

1 quart reduced-fat dairy eggnog or 1 

can (1 quart) eggnog 

1 can (12 ounces) frozen orange juice 

concentrate (thawed) 

1 can (12 ounces) ginger ale (chilled) 



Makes eight 7-ounce servings. 
Preparation time: 5 minutes. 



Step 1: 

In a pitcher, stir eggnog and orange juice concentrate until well mixed. Pour in ginger 
ale and stir gently. 



Ingredients 
2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley 
1 tablespoon minced fresh rosemary, 
or 1 teaspoon dried rosemary, crumbled . 
.1 tablespoon minced fresh thyme, 
or 1 teaspoon dried thyme, crumbled 
1 tablespoon minced fresh mint, 
or 1 teaspoon mint flakes 
1 tablespoon olive oil 
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar 
" 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 

1 teaspoon each salt and pepper 

1 whole, bone-in leg of lamb (about 6 pounds) 

2 cloves garlic, cut Into 12 silvers 

Makes servings 
Preparation time: 25 minutes 
Roasting time: Until thermometer registers I45°F 
Standing time: 15 minutes 






* 



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* HOLIDAY 
SPECIALS 




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Festive Apple Tart 

• 1/2 cup apple juice or water . 

• 3 large, tart baking apples, peeled, 
cored and sliced 

• 1 18 oz roll refrigerated sugar 
•1/4 cup sugar 

• 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 

• 2 tablespoons lemon juice 

• Hershey s Syrup 

• Reddi-wip Whipped Cream 

In a large skillet, heat apple juice or water to boiling: add apples. Reduce heat. Cov- 
er, simmer 3 minutes or until apples are tender. With slotted spoon, remove apple slices. 
Cool slightly. 

Press cookie dough into greased and floured 10-inch quiche dish or tart pan or 9- 
inch pie plate, pressing.dough evenly onto the bottom and up the sides of dish; 

In small bowl, combine sugar and cinnamon. Toss together apple slices, lemon juice 
and cinnamon sugar mixture. 

Arrange apple slices on prepared crust. Bake in 375 degree R oven, 30 to 40 minutes 
or until evenly browned and set. Cool slightly. Serve warm, drizzled with Hershey's Syrup 
and topped generously with Reddi-wip Whipped Cream. 8 to 10 servings. 



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V^-C o 




QUrrtstmas Trees 



Concolor Natural Growing Areas 

Prefers motst, well-cranod wis n 
lakes and streams, ft f kes cold wint 

and warm simmers. 



Fir 



Eraser Fir Natural Growing Areas 

Very small pawing region, malnh/ In the Appalaehl 
Mountains, above 4,000 feet Commercial planting is 

extending Its range. 

Needles /Branches /Foliage 

Short, 3/8\ 1 1/4', needles have broad circularbase. 
They grow moderately fast and are ready lor harvest 
in about seven years. Beautiful green foliage. 




Douglas Fir 




Natural Growing Areas 

Prefers mild, humid cfmates wi 
dry summers. 

Needles /Branches /Foliage 

1 ■ flat, soft, bright green needes spread In two rows, 
but may stick out In el directions. Rapid growing, It is 
ready for rrtarket in six • seven years. With shearing, It 
becomes full and bushy. Cones hang down. 





Needles/Branches/Foliage 
2' to 3* flat needes rounded at the tip. They are 
snugly attached and form ■ very soft feather-lie 
spray of foiage. Soft blue green color, frep/snt 





Eastern Natural Growing Areas 

Vlijte Mers moist, sandy soiL Can take cold, but not dry, 

cold winter. Few virgei stands remain because of 
Pme *wrl*h» Heedkl/Bnmcta|/pBl|afe - 

Bhiish-green needles are 2" - 5" long, soft, slender 
and flexible. nfy White Pine h?s needles In bundles 
of five West White Pane Is similar, but has shorter, 
stouter needles. 

Natural Growing Areas 

Moist, sandy soil, very hardy 1.5-2.5" Blue green needles. 
Needle retention very good. Holds up well, easy to decorate. 




Scotch Pine 



BALLED & BURIAPPED 
CHR1STNAS TREES 
Blue Spruce/Douglas Fir 4-6 Ft 



Save $5,00 Fraser Fir or 
$10 Concolor Fir 

With this ad. Expires 12-25-00 



MARK COOK'S 
GARDEN CENTER 

lot Fast Main St., Lake Zurich, IL; 

438-2120 

OPEN 7 DAVS A WEEK ^ 



Our Gartleir Center Carries 
a' complete Christ nuts Line. 

• Wreathes • Poinsettias 'Roping 

• Garland • Holly Custom 
Decorated Indoor/Outdoor Wreaths 



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C2.Q /Lakeland Newspapers 



FAVORITE HOLIDAY RECIPES 



November 24, 2000 



Dropping holiday pounds 

Tasty salad ideas for post- feasting diets 




oUowing the feasting of the holidays, many folks might feel a bit stuffed. The 
scales may even confirm some added pounds. One easy solution to post- 
holiday weight is a diet that focuses more on produce than on red meats 
and other fatty foods. 




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While salads top the list of produce 
entrees, some people are turned off to 
the time-consuming chore of rinsing, 
drying, chopping and later storing let- 
tuce. But salads no longer have to be 
difficult. Prepackaged salads of- 
fer a quick, easy, low- 
calorie way to en 
joy salads and 
get our 

physique 
back in 
shape. 




r ack- 
aged salads are 
cut, washed, dried, and 
ready to eat. The bags 
keep salads fresh in the 
refrigerator up to 14 days. 



When you are ready to eat them, they 
go from your refrigerator to your plate 
in the time it takes to open the bag. 
Some packaged salads, called "Salad 
Kits," come with individual packages 
of dressing, croutons, cheeses and oth- 
er garnishes. Salad Kits are very popu- 
lar, having increased in 
sales this year by 151 
percent. Some in- 
stant salads avail- 
able are Fat 
Free Caesar, 
Oriental, Fies- 
ta and Italiano. 
For added, lower fat 
protein, you can add 
chicken or even some leftover 
holiday turkey. 





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Audio Experts & Communications 



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43 S. Rt 12 • Fox Lake, IL 

587-6701 



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Remote Starts X *7 ^ installGd 

•normal install, guaranteed 1000 (t.rsngo John & Barb Gebert, Owners;Troy Evert, Manager. 



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November 24 
-January 01 

A Winter 
Wonderland 



Vernon Hills: Cuneo Museum & 
Gardens, 1350 N. Milwaukee Ave. 

Northern Illinois' largest 

drive-through holiday light festival. 

For times and more information, 

call 847.367.3700. 



December 
9 

Christmas 
Craft Fair 

Libertyville: Marytown, 

1600W. Park Ave. Time: 

1 a.m. -4 p.m. For more 

information, call 

847.367.7800. 

10 

Handel's Messiah 

Handel's Messiah presented by the Festival Arts 

of Antioch, Community Choir performance will 

be held at St. Peter Catholic Church in Antioch. 

Info call: 847.265.3152 




December 
14 

Gifts' from the Kitchen 

Gifts fromthe Kitchen at Lake Villa District 
Library. Are you looking for new ways to give 
gifts auring the holiday season? Learn how to 
give of yourself by making gifts prepared. in the 
kitchen at Lake Villa District Library from 1-2pm. 
University of Illinois Nutrition and Wellness 
Educator, Drucilla Banks will share new ideas 
for gift giving 
whjle consid- 
ering nutrition 
and food 
safety. 
Refreshments 
will be served. 

Info call: 
847.356.7711. 





15 



Family 
Night 

Hastings YMCA 
Family Night Time: 

6:45 - 10 p.m. 
Activities include 
Santa underwater 
tree trimming. For 
more information, 
call 847.356.4006. 





.. 



December 



17 

Lake County 
smen's Snow 




Sport __________ 

Crayslake: Lake County Fairgrounds, Rt. 

120 & 45. Time: 8 a.m.-2 p.m. For more 

information, call 847.577.8380 

Nov. 24 - Dec. 31 

A Festival of Lights 
and Flowers 

The Chicago Botanic Garden becomes a winter wonderland 
during Celebrations! A Festival of Lights and Flowers. Experi- 
ence trie magic of 750,000 lights, vibrant indoor gardens and 
an array of family programs - all at the Garden's Celebrations. 
Celebrations Performances and Demonstrations 



Wednesday - Sunday Programs 
Storytelling: 5:30 & 6:30 p.m. 
Demonstrations; 6 p.m. 
Ice Sculpting: 6:45 -8:30 p.m. 
Performances: 7 & 8 p.m. 
Family Crafts: 5 - 9 p.m. 
Carriage Rides: 5:15-9 p.m. 

(10p.m. weekends). 
Additional fee of $6 
adults, $4 children; 
tickets go on sale 
at 5:15 p.m. 



■ 









■mm 





Full Service Entertainment & Rental Specialists 



// 



// 



'All Cartoon Characters' 

Buzz - Woody - Pokemon - Teletubbies 

Rugrats - Mickey - Minnie - Sylvester 

Tweetie - Bugs Bunny - Scooby Doo 

Elmo - Cookie Monster - Big Bird 

Dorothy - Arthur - Blue's Clues '.- Cinderella 

Pooh - Piglet - Tigger - Easter Bunnies 




yyvyvv:celebrdtion 



Ball Ponds 
Moon Bouncer 
Karaoke Machines 
Fun Food Machines 
A Much, Much More! 
Call now to receive a 
FREE info packet 




Suburban Family • December 2000 7 



MENTONE'S 



Family Dining at its best 

' 4 

Banquet facilities available • Reservations accepted 

Carry out Catering 

^he SVlentone family 

'Wish you *Happy ^Holidays 




New Year's 

at our New 
Year's Eve Gala 





Bob dchroeder is and & favors. j\ \ 

Call for reservations and inform atioiL Jl\ Jj\^^ 



OPENrTUES. -THURS. 12-9, FRI. 12-CLOSE, SAT. & SUN. 11-CLOSE 
PARTIES OF 8 OR MORE • PLEASE CALL AHEAD FOR RESERVATIONS 

FRIDAY NIGHT ALL YOU CAN EAT FISH FRY 

SATURDAY NIGHT 

OUR FAMOUS PRIME RIB BUFFET 

Also: PORK RIBS, ITALIAN SAUSAGE 

& PEPPERS, SALAD BAR 





The Mentone family ^%s\ JsJT?'^ 

Don Jr., Donald, Antoinette, ^tVM ^ 

Dean, and Betty v v N 

Route 173 • Antioch • 847-395-4550 



Q 



NTIOCH 



ANES 




750 West Route 173 

Antioch, IL 60002 

{847)395-1155 

Hours: open daily 10 am 



All Newly Remodeled (28 Lanes) 




Karaoke on Friday 
& Saturday evenings 





1st & 10 Sports Bar & 



Come see the 29th Lane - 

the bar is an actual 

howling lane! 

TVs everywhere 

VtO"TV for the real serious 

sports fans. Take a break from 

TV and enjoy 1 of our 3 Pool 

or Air Hockey tables. 




Christmas Parties & Banquets 

1st & 10 backroom available for Private Parties. 

Call for further information. 




■The To wer Room 
750Hwy.l73, Antioch 

(847) 395-1193 



For All Your Banquet Needs 
Specializing in 
Wedding Receptions 
Anniversaries • Birthdays 

Plan ahead for siio wers, weddings, graduations 
and any special occasions. 






Banquet & Catering Facility 



% 



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/ 



8 



e&fc 6 v e 2000 



Reserve Your Table Today For Our 
19th Annual Gala Celebration 

$125 per couple 

Prime Rib and 

Shrimp Cocktail 

Buffet w/ Appetizers 

and pastries. Six 

hours of a deluxe 

open bar, 

DJ Music by 

DJ Enterprises. 

Champagne Toast at 

Midnight with party 

favors too! Reserve 

Catering your table of 10 today! 

Anytime 

Anywhere 

Anysize 





(847) 587-6100 

Located at the 

intersection of Rt. 59 

and Washington St. 

in Fox Lake, IL 



mm.- 




8 Suburban Family • December 2000 



Dining & Entertainment 



Places to go for f amity Jun ♦ 



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Roast Stuffed Cornish Hen $.8.25 

Half Roast Style Duck .$8.95 

Roast Leg of Lamb .$8.95 

Baked Honey Ham (Country Style)$8.25 

Half Roast-Style Chicken . . . $7.25 

Roast-Style Loin of Pork $8.65 

Broiled Lake Superior Whitefish . .$9.45 
Oven-Roasted ButterbaU Tom Turkey $8.25 
London Broil $9.25 



Chicken Asparagus Alfredo $8.25 

Broiled Orange Roughy $9-55 

Broiled Skirt Steak .$9.45 

Steak Continental . . . . .-$8.95 

Chicken Ala Oscar $9-25 

(2) Broiled Center-Cut Pork Chops$9.85 
Chicken Dijon $8.25 



Chef's Prime Special 
Roast Prime Rib of Beef 



$12.95 



'COMPLIMENTARY GLASS OF HOUSE WINE 

All above entrees include your choice of; small cacsar 
salad, tossed salad OR bowl of Soup OR Sweet Potatoes 

OR Potato OR small bowl of pasta may be substituted 

for rice w/oven potato. Dessert is a warm slice of apple, 

cherry or blueberry pic. 






SHEN DAO TEMPLE OF THE ARTS PRESENTS 

TAICHI 

Gome experience the most awesome form of relaxation, 
meditation, and martial art known to human existence. Two 
thousand years of perfection brings you the most powerful and 
complete system' of martial art known today. Focusing on 
mastery of the mental, physical, and spiritual concepts. 

C^TTT TCTTTVCtt Learn Jo strengthen and increase blood flow, energy,* 

physical power, relaxation, concentration, and focus 
throughout your entire being. 

SHAOLIN KUNG FU 

This physical martial art system is exceptional to other hard 
style systems because of the soft and powerful internal qualities 
it has inherited from the fighting monk systems of China. If 
you like hard physical training you will enjoy this system. 

KIDS KUNG FU 

I will be teaching a form of kung fu known as TAN.TUI 
pronounced [tan-tu-e] a system of building body strength, 
mind discipline, and martial art skill. This system was 
developed over 2000 years ago by chinescmonks. It is the 
basic foundation of every martial art system known today. 
This learning will be done in a disciplined and attention 
focused atmosphere, so children will learn adult skills, 
while still retaining the fun and enjoyment of childhood. 
It will be a perfect balance of learning, fun & health. 

© Increase circulation. 

© Improves concentration. 

© Increase energy. 

© Increase flexibility. 

© Improve balance. 

© Increase lung capacity. 

© Relieve stress. 

© Improves coordination. 

© improves self-esteem. 13 Nippersink Blvd., Suite 1 

© Strengthen ligaments and tendons. Fox Lake, IL 60020 

© Stenghtens and tones die body. 

© Improves sleep and digestive system. 847 ,, 58/' , 521 

Instructor: John J. Ferrante • Asst. Instructor: Howard Hudson 
Private Lessons • Healing Treatments • Spiritual Counseling 





Make the first stop of the Day Whistle Stop Cafe 

Whistle 

Stop Cafe 



'■■.•'- ' 



^^Q ^^r ^^B ^^^ ^^^B^ ^^B^F ^^^^^^ 

Allot us at Whistle Stop wish you 
HAPPY HOLIDAYS , 

A warm friendly atmosphere, railroad decor, and a 
variety of delicious home cooked foods, including 
1. Country-Style Breakfast 

Fresh Baked Items 

Specialty Coffee Flavor of the Day 

Children's Menu 

We also specialize in Authentic 

Mexican Food 



2. 



*■ 



Specials Daily 

New additional seating 
Larger non-smoking area 
Railroad memorabilia • 
Ample parking (east of cafe) 



Food Can 
Be Prepared 
For Carryout 



15 E. GRAND AVENUE, FOX LAKE 

?■ (847) 587-5654 | 

Mon.-Fri. 5 am- 3 pm 
Sat. 6 am - 3 pm • Sun. 6 am - 2 pm 




f»aoe Walk 



M 



Holiday Party Spectacular 




Indoor Bouncer or Clown Bouncer 
plus Any one Concession Machine 

$155.00 

Including delivery,set-up & s hours of use 

W/ AD. On RESIDEDTIAL REtlTAL. MAY HOT BE USED in COnJUnCTIOn 
WITH Any OTHER OFFER. MUST BOOK By 2/28/01. 

We Have Indoor Units and over 
75 Inflatable Amusements 

1-815-436-5777 

Visit our webisteWWW.herecomesfun.com/fxv 



Places to go for family fun ♦ 



Suburban Family • December 2000 9 



OH 



Kids in the Kitchen 



Family cooking 



Recipes and photographs for Kids in the Kitchen are suppliedbywww.culinary.net 
Visjt their website for a wealth of recipes for you and your kids! 



Christmas Cookies 




Makes 4-1/2 dozen cookies 

Ingredients 

1 cup margarine, softened 
3/4 cup granulated sugar 
3/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar 

2 eggs 

1 teaspoon vanilla extract 
2-1/4 cups all-purpose flour 
1 teaspoon baking soda 

») 1-2/3 cups coarsely chopped white 
chocolate or vanilla milk chips 
1-1/2 cups dried tart cherries 
1 cup cashews, coarsely chopped 

Preparation 

Combine margarine, granulated sugar, brown sugar, eggs and vanilla in a large 
mixing bowl. Beat with an electric mixer on medium speed until thoroughly 
mixed. Combine flour and baking soda; gradually add flour mixture to butter 
mixture. Stir in white chocolate, dried cherries and cashews. Drop by rounded 
tablespoonfuls onto ungreased baking sheets. 

Bake in a preheated 350-degree oven 10 to 12 minutes, or until light golden 
brown. Do not overbake. Let cool on wire racks; store in a tightly covered 
container. These cookies freeze well. 

Source Cherry Marketing Institute Inc. 

Pebbles Holiday Crispy Squares 
& Pebbles Holiday Wreaths 

Preparation: 10 minutes plus cooling or Microwave: 2 minutes 15 seconds. 
Makes 18 wreaths. 

Ingredients 

1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter or margarine 
1 pkg. (10 1/2 ounces) miniature marshmallows (6 cups) 
i 1 pkg. (13 ounces) Post Fruity or Cocoa Pebbles Cereal (about 8 1/2 cups) 

Preparation for Crispy Squares 

LINE.13x9-inch pan with foil; lightly grease foil. MICROWAVE butter in 4-quart 
microwavable bowl on HIGH 45 seconds or until melted. Add marshmallows; 
mix to coat. Microwave 1 1/2 minutes or until marshmallows are melted and 
smooth, stirring after 45 seconds. Add cereal; mix to coat well. PRESS firmly . 
into prepared pan. Cool. Cut into squares. For holiday packages, garnish with 
bows made from chewy fruit snack rolls or string licorice, if desired. Makes 
about 24 squares. 



Preparation for Holiday Wreaths 

Prepare cereal mixture as directed above. 
With greased hands, shape 1/2 cup of the 
cereal mixture into wreath shape. Place 
on wax paper-lined tray. Repeat with 
remaining cereal mixture. Cool. Garnish 
with green decorating icing and red hot 
cinnamon candies or bows made from 
chewy fruit snack rolls or string licorice, 
if desired. 

Source Post Fruity Pebbles 




Yummy Yammy Face 



The sweet and moist Louisiana yams makes this a creamy sensational filling. ; 
', Makes 8 sewings. 

Ingredients 

6 medium sweet potatoes (yams) 

4 tbsp margarine 

1/2 cup evaporated skimmed milk 

1/3 cup sugar 

1 tsp vanilla extract 

Miniature marshmallows 

Topping (recipe follows) 

Preparation 

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Wash the yams and poke holes with a fork. 
. Bake for 45 minutes to 1 hour or until tender. Scoop out the inside of each' 
potato and place mixture into a mixing bowl. In the bowl, mash the potatoes 
until no lumps remain. Add the margarine, evaporated milk, sugar and vanilla, 
blending until smooth and creamy. Transfer the mixture into a 9-inch pie plate 
coated with nonstick cooking spray. Arrange the marshmallows for the 
eyes and make a big smile and around the edge to make hair. Lower the oven 
temperature to 350 degrees. Bake for 20 to 30 minutes or until the crumble is 
brown and the marshmallows melted. 

Topping 

1/2 cup light brown sugar 1/2 cup all-purpose flour 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon 
. 3 tbsp margarine, softened 1 tsp vanilla extract In a bowl, mix together the 

brown sugar, flour and cinnamon. With a fork, blend in the margarine and 
, vanilla until /the mixture is crumbly. 



Source Louisiana Sweet Potato Commission 




Famous Chocolate Refrigerator Roll 

Makes 12 sewings 

Ingredients 

1 teaspoon vanilla extract 

2 cups heavy cream, whipped, OR 

1 (8-ounce) container frozen whipped topping, thawed 
1 (9-ounce) package NABISCO Famous Chocolate Wafers 
Chocolate curls, for garnish 

Preparation 

1. Stir vanilla into whipped cream or topping. 

2. Spread 1/2 tablespoon whipped 
cream or topping on each wafer. 
Begin stacking wafers together and 
stand on edge on serving platter to 
make a 14-inch log. 

3. Frost with remaining whipped cream 
or topping. Chill for 4 to 6 hours 
(*Or, freeze until firm; cover with 
plastic wrap. Thaw in refrigerator for 

. 1 hour before serving). To serve, 
garnish with chocolate curls; slice 
roll at 45° angle. 



Source Nilla Wafers 



Easy Nilla Fudge 

Makes 64 squares 

Ingredients 

1 (4-serving size) package ROYAL Instant 
Chocolate Pudding & Pie Filling 
1/3 cup margarine or butter, melted 
1/4 cup milk 
3 cups powdered sugar 
14 NILLA Wafers, coarsely chopped 

Preparation 

1. Beat pudding mix, margarine or butter and milk in large bowl with electric 

" mixer at low speed for 2 minutes. Slowly beat in powdered sugar until blended. 

2. Turn onto clean, dry surface and knead in wafers. Press mixture into 8 x 8 x 
2-inch pan. ' ' 

3. Refrigerate 2 hours. Cut into 1-inch squares. Store in airtight container. 
Source Nilla Wafers 



Stained Glass Pretzels 

Ingredients 

12 (2 1/2-inch) pretzel twists* 

2 (l.'14-ounce) roils LIFE SAVERS Tropical Fruits, Five Flavor or Butter Rum 

Roll Candy 

Preparation 

1. Place pretzels on foil-lined baking sheet. Crush each color of candy 
separately between 2 layers of waxed paper or in sealed plastic bag; 
spoon inside pretzel cutouts. 

2. Bake at 400 degrees F for 6 to 8 minutes or until candy is melted. Cool 
completely before removing from foil. Store in tightly covered container for 
up to 1 week. 

Preparation Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 6 minutes Cooling Time: 30 minutes 
Source Life Savers Candy 




Fruity Popcorn Balls 



^ 









€ 



•$ 



V 




» 



Makes 15 (V 1 /2-inch) balls 

Ingredients 

1/2 cup sugar 

1/2 cup corn syrup 

1 (1.14-ounce) roll LIFE SAVERS Five Flavor or 
Butter Rum Roll Candy* 

2 tablespoons margarine or butter 
1/2 teaspoon salt 

8 cups popped popcorn, unpopped kernels removed 
1/2 cup PLANTERS Sliced Almonds, toasted and chopped 

Preparation 

1. Cook and stir sugar, corn syrup, roll candies, margarine or butter and salt in 
large saucepan over medium heat until mixture boils and candy melts. 

2. Stir in popcorn until well coated. Remove from heat; stir in almonds. Spoon 
onto waxed paper; cool slightly. 

3. Shape Into 1 1/2-inch balls with lightly greased hands. Cool completely; 
wrap individually in colorful plastic wrap and tie with ribbons. 

Variations . 

Substitute 9 individually wrapped LIFE SA VERS Five Flavor large size pieces. 






10 Suburban Family • December 2000 




! . U ^ ...__ •— •-•-. ■ ' - - - " 



. , , , l*J, . 



Parent Time 




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Hi Dr. Singer, 

We have a 4-year-old boy with a 
rather interesting-problem. He cannot 
seem to keep his fingers out of his 
nose. He loves to pick and pick 
and pick. Wehave tried all kinds of 
remedies we have read about and 
heard from others. Do you have any 
thoughts on it? We hope you'll call this 
column, "Pick a Winner!" L.L. 

Hi- L.L, 

Thanks for the title! Yes I do have, 
some. thoughts. Firs.t ( e.ven though. tq . : , 
f6u and I aha* other adults, it may seem 
ike a gross thing, you have to keep in 
mind that this little person is fascinated 
by all the intricacies of his body, 
including, but not limited to, his nos- 
trils! Whether this is a problem or not 
will, remain to be seen. 

The first thing that I would be 
concerned with is whether you have 
had this child's nose 
looked at by a Med- 
ical Doctor. It is 
possible that the child 
scratched it and has 
continued to go back 
to it because it is • 
feeling bad or is 
infected. He may 
keep opening it up 
which can cause him 
to keep going back to 
it. I've seen that 
many times before. 
So, first, get him 
checked by the M.D. 
If IheM.D. rules out 
anything physical, 
and you really need 
this child to stop 
doing this, you will : 
neeato do some . 
behavior training with 
the child. Again, like I 
always say, behavior 
training needs to be handled in the 
office with a professional and not in a 
column. 

If not medical, this is a behavior like 
any other behavior. At 4-years-oId, most 
kids are pretty verbal and do understand 
verbal directions (even if they have 
selective hearing and don't want to 
listen all the time.) Behavioral training 
usually involves rewards for the behav- 
ior you want to see and deterrents for 
the behavior you don't want to see. 

Now, what constitutes rewards.and 
deterrents or punishments will need to 
be decided personally, either by you 
and your spouse, or by you, your 
spouse and therapist. If you do this, 
keep it appropriate. Don't go overboard. 
1 will say that 1 don't think that it is a 
catastrophic type of problem and if you 



calmly let your child know, repeatedly 
over a period of time, that you don't 
accept it and divert the child's attention 
to something better, he will more than 
likely stop. It you make a huge deal out 
of it and give the child a lot of attention 
for that behavior every time it is 
happening, it probably will not stop 
happening. You may actually be 
feeding more into it by overreacting . 
than by leaving it be. 

. I have a great story for you that will 
make you laugh and also make you feel, 
better- about the problem at hand. It.will 
make you feel better because no one 
could top the level of embarrassment 
that this one caused! When I was about 
7 years old, my sister was 5 and we all 
went to WGN to see "Bozo's Circus." 
We were so excited to see this show. 
We waited in line and finally got to our 
seats. When we were all settled, my 
5-year-old sister went to work on some- 
thing that she 
had practiced 
and noned 
into a skill to 
behold. 

She would 
suck her 
thumb, but 
in a way you 
have proba- 
bly never 
experienced. 
She had long 
hair and 
would take a 
strand of hair 
from each 
side of her 
head and 
stick it up the 
correspond- 
ing nostril on 
that side, 
while suck-- 
ing her thumb. So, to look at her from 
the front, she looked like a 5-year-old 
girl with a mustache. Well, my parents 
had been trying to stop her from doing 
this for a while, but for some reason, it 
was very enjoyable to her. After my 
sister had been sitting at the Bozo show 
doing this for a while, my mother 
glanced over and noticed that a 
cameraman had noticed my sister and 
thought it was the cutest thing he had 
ever seen and zoomed the camera in on 
my family and my sister. 

Some of my parents' friends were 
aware that we were there that day and 
later told us that they had never had 
such a laugh in their lives. Needless to 
say, the next day, my sister's hair was 
cut s.hort. 

Hope this story helps you-put things 
tn perspective! ♦ 



PARENT TIME 

By Dr. Sherri Singer 

Licensed Clinical Psychologist and 
Childhood Behavior Specialist. 



Dr. Sherri Singer is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and Childhood Behavior 
Specialist. She regularly works in person with many readers of this column, 
helping them to significantly improve their kid's behavior and learning skills 
fast Among many other services, she offers a "Parent Survival Training" class 
for parents. It lasts 3 weeks and has helped countless families to restore good 
behavior to their kids and peace and quiet to their homes! She is the author of, 
"Why Kids Misbehave" and "Raising Kids Who Don't Become Your Worst 
Nightmare." For an appointment or to purchase either of Dr. Singer's books, 
please call (847) 577-8832 or (708) 962-2549 



WWWWWWWWWfWWWWWWTTm 



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to see. ' 




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Suburban Family • December 2000 11 




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12 Suburban Family • December 2000 



December 1, 2000 




Lakeland Newspapers/ CI 




9! 





G2/Lakeland Newspapers 



CHRISTMAS MEMORIES 



December 1,2000 









December 1, 2000 



CHRISTMAS MEMORIES 



Lakeland Newspapers/G3 






■ 



V 



My mended heart is a happy heart 

Dolores Nick 
Prairie View 

Dec. 24, 1997— "All Hearts Come Home for Christmas," said the heart being, 
held by the rag-type doll that one of my co-workers sent up to the hospital after 
hearing about my heart attack. 

As I looked around the hospital room at my poinsettia, holiday flowers, etc. 
from friends and family, I began to feel guilty. I was feeling this way because this 
was the first year that Christmas cards and my annual Christmas letterwere not 
sent out and shopping (especially for grandchildren) was not done. Hospital 
stays give one lots of time to reflect on life. At that moment, I glanced out the 
window and could see the big fluffy snow flakes fluttering down and piling on 
the sill outside. My thoughts were broken by my doctor's voice saying he was re- 
leasing me if someone was willing to come pick me up in spite of the snow 
storm. 

Two of my daughters dropped their last minute shopping, wrapping and 
cooking to come to the hospital to pick me up. The ride home from the hospital 
was a slippery one. Cars were sliding off the roads into drifted snow banks, fend- 
er benders were everywhere and just seeing the car in front of one was a chal- 
lenge. The dedication of my daughters wanting me to be home for Christmas 
were driving forces for everyone to pull together in order to make the holiday a 
special one. 

' Suddenly, I didn't care about the cards that didn't go out, and the gifts that 
didn't get purchased because I had been blessed with the gift of spending 
Christmas with the hearts that wanted me home. My mended heart was a hap- 
py heart because sharing the gift of time and memories wills those who are so 
connected and intertwined will be etched in my heart forever. 




Peter Varghese 

970 E. RofrB RcU 
Round Lske Beach 

847-223-7786 
••••••••••• 

Roger R. Lutz 

108 Certs- St>Graysfete 

DcmrtoMn toeatfcn stice T977 

847-223-2888 



fromour 
family to yours, 

haved*Happy 
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Skyler, Spencer and Sawyer with Santa - Submitted by Dolores Nick 



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HOLIDAY 
HOLIDAY 

At Hillcrest Nursing Center we 
like to get into the "Holiday 
Spirit" by decorating our 
residents doors. If you would 
like to decorate a door please 
contact Joel Crabtree at (847) 
546-5300. This year Hillcrest is 
teaming up with the Round 
Lake "Shop with a Cop" pro- 
gram for needy children. We are 
asking participants to bring an 
unwrapped gift valued at $10 
for a boy or girl. Visit us and 
see the ."Holiday Spirit" in 
action. Door decorating 
is between December 1st 
& December 13th. Come 
join us in this festive 
holiday season. Our residents 
would love to see you too!! . 



Hillcrestj 

nurstng center ^r 




1740 N. Circuit Drive 
Round Lake Beach 

IL, 60073 
(847) 





* * * i * * i • \ • 



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C^/Lakeland Newspapers 



CHRISTMAS MEMORIES 



December 1,2000 



Lakeland Newspapers is proud to announce 
the winners of the Christmas Memories contest 



The Christmas Memory 



Decorating the tree has always been one of the prime things of Christ- 
mas time, but this year was unlike the others! This was my baby sister's first 

- ' i- Christmas and the tree was go 



First Prize 

Heather Brooks 
Age 12 
Gurnee 



ing to look excellent! The day fi- 
nally was approaching. My 
mother and 1 had fake candles 
to use on the tree. The night be- 
fore the decorating I crept out 
of bed to get one last look at the 
tree. The next night it was 
• time-time to decorate the tree! 
The foremost was to put 
on the tinsel. It looked wonder- 
ful gleaming there! Next were 
the candles. The artificial candles 
were shimmering with beams coming every which way! The most impor- 
tant part was to put the ornaments on. 

When it was all done, my mother and I stood back and beamed at the 
tree proudly! The false tree looked authentic and genuine! My sister could- 
n't talk, but somehow I knew she fancied the tree best of all. 

Heather wins a new VCR 





Sharing the Holiday with 
a Christmas Ride 



On Christmas, when I was little, ( 1960s,) our neighbor, Andy Barkules, 
would ride over on his horse, 
Knucklehead, to give the chil- 
dren in our family individual 
rides back to his house. His wife 
and family would bewailing at 
the door with a gift from Santa. 
The return ride back home on 
Knucklehead was so exciting 
and made for such a Merry 
Christmas. 

These are such great mem- 
ories of great neighbors going 
but of their way to leave a special 
Christmas memory on all the neighborhood children. 

Sherrie wins a year's subscription to Lakeland Newspapers 



Second Prize 

Sherrie Mustari 
Vernon Hills 



i« 




Christmas with Grandma Nygaard in Harelston, MS, 1972 - Sub- 
mitted by Jo Slay, Hainesville 



IF YOU DON'T SEE SOMETHING YOU WANT, JUST ASK!! 

Catering 

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Please ask for Manager, Allow 4-5 days for Party Packages 

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"Re"-Decorate 
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1020 Rollins Road • Round Lake Heiahts 

847-546-7787 

All major credit cards accepted - 90 days same as cash 



i 



■ 



% 






O 

n 

I 



1 



December 1, 2000 



CHRISTMAS MEMORIES 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C5 



I 



I 



i 



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HELP... 





GIVE 



The holiday season is upon us. While you ponder what gifts to give your 
ioved ones, we urge you to take a few moments to think of those.less fortunate 
and those in need of the most basic elements of life. 

There are many local and regional groups in the area that rely on the kindness 
of the community to help others and many are in desperate need of assistance. 

Following is a list of organizations, both local and national, that accept do- 
nations of money and goods or that require volunteers to accomplish their goals. 
The groups vary in purpose and in their levels of need. Contact information is 
provided so that readers can call or write for more information. 

Helping those in need is a wonderful way for your family or business to come 




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7 As The Family Gathers For The Holidays 




together and give back to the community. "Need knows no season," so please 
consider using this list throughout the coming year and sharing it with others. 
Various organizations will be featured throughout the holiday season, so keep 
reading. 

Please note that we have gathered this information from various sources and 
cannot guarantee the integrity of each organization. You are urged to learn as 
much as you can about each agency before deciding to donate funds. Lakeland 
Media does not accept liability for any misleading information that may have 
been provided. 

Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Lake County 

3701-G Grand Ave., Gurnee, IL 60031 
Phone: (847) 360-0770 
Fax:(847)360-0784 
Web: www.bbbslc.org 

Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Lake County is a community organization 
dedicated to promoting the personal growth and development of children and 
youth, primarily through'professionally supervised one-to-one relationships with 

Continued on page 12 



f 



With A Family Portrait ■-; 

Let us create holiday memories you'll enjoy allyear — year 
after year. A family portrait is a gift that keeps on giving. 



PLAN NOW FOR HOLIDAY CARDS AND GIFTS 



-PlCtulie^^ To Assure Holiday Deliverylall Now! 



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Located on Ifie Corner oF Washington & 

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A Great Place To Have Some 
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■' 




DISTRICT 



Zion Leisure Center 

2400 Dowie Memorial Drive, Zion 

(847)746-5500 

We Have A Wide Range Of 

Special Recreation 
Services! 



Registration For Spring 
Term Begins 12/12/00 Is 

(Totstiirm^iAdults/Be^nner 
ti Advanced) 

Sign up at the Ice Arena! 



Ask About Our 

Kid's Recreation Programs 

AfterSchooI Adventure Befbre/AfterSchool Care 
Kindergarten Kapers A pre-k'mdergarten prep 

Kiddie Korners Preschool program 
Mommy & Me Structured actmtiesfor2-} p. ol<k& mom 



-. 



. i7?fl Breakfast With Santa Saturday, December? • 9:30am to 11 :00am| 
fe^W Children under 9 can enjoy apancake breakfast, recerve'a girtfrpm Santa, pose for a' 
*y photo and mate a craft AtShilo Center Children $10 • ^Md J]5 • Adiifc; $3 



Enjoy Public Skating during 
the following times: 

Sunday t:00-2:?0 p.m. ■ Tuesdjy 11:00 J.in.-1:00 p.m. 
.Wfdwsdjy WO-WO pin. • fliunJiv 11:00 J.m,-l;00 pjn. 
Fridjy8:00p.ni/>;30|).m. • SjItVrcfay l:00-2HO p.m. 

'Keiiul shies jwi'thhlt 



J 



D J. SKATES 

Every Friday Evening 
8:00-9:30 p.m. - 








- — . ..■ - .- . . . . 



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M^jwm—w*^iWM*iwi^^n — j i i i i i w ^>«i L .'i i . 



G6/Lakeland Newspapers 



CHRISTMAS MEMORIES 



December 1,2000 




Swedish Glee Club presents 'Julmiddag' 



Lauren Shipman dances with Santa last Christmas. - Submitted by Linda Shipman, 
Graysiake 



The Waukegan 

Swedish Glee Club will pre- 
sent its annual Christmas 
concert and Julmiddag 
(Christmas dinner) on De- 
cember 16 at the Scandina- 
vian-American Cultural So- 
ciety, 2323 North Wilke Rd. 
(Frontage Road) in Arling- 
ton Heights. The concert 
begins at 4 p.m. and dinner follows. 

Directed by Jeff DeLay and accompanied 
by Ruth Porikos, the Glee Club will welcome 
the season with traditional Scandinavian and 
American Christmas music. 

Guest performer Margie Karl, soprano, 




will sing solos between the 
two halves of the Glee 
Club's program. 

Guests will be pleased to 
see as well as taste the 
beautiful Grand Christmas 
buffet which will include 
Swedish meat balls, rice 
pudding with lingonber- 
ries, festive pastries, and 
many other Scandinavian and American deli- 
cacies. 

Tickets are $32 for adults and $15 for chil- 
dren age 12 and under. Reservations must be 
made by December 1. Call Jim Edfors at 437- 
9467. 



mm 



i 



WHEN THE 
BANK SAYS NO 

WE SAY YES 
INSTANT CASH! 



CALL TODAY - MONEY TODAY! 
15 MINUTE LOANS! 

NO CREDIT CHECKS! 




ADVANCE ON 
-PERSONAL CHECKS 



LOANS ON CAR 
nUES-YOUKEEPTHECAfl 



CHECK CASHING 



RIAENV1A 

MONEY TRANSFERS 




• PAYDAY LOANS 
POSTDATED CHECKS 
Se Habla Espanol 



L 



RO UND LAKE TITLE LOA NS 

839 W. Rollins Rd. • Round Lake Beach 

(847) 546-5958 




Ha v Your 
Holidays Glow! 



HERE'S HOPING YOU HAVE THE WARMEST OF 

HOLIDAYS. THANK YOU FOR WARMING OUR 

HEARTS WITH YOUR LOYAL SUPPORT 

Qualify Affordable 

Apartment Living 

for the Active Senior Adult 



Lilac Apartments 

547-557-5530 

Now Accepting Applications 3 Lilac • Fox Lake, 1L 60020 



Favorite Christmas 
Memory 

Kim Rose 
Hound iMkc Heights 

Last year's Christmas is my favorite mem- 
ory by far. 

Every Christmas Eve my husband's family 
gathers together to celebrate the holiday sea- 
son. My husband and I decided to surprise 
young and old with a visit from Santa Claus. 

Dressed up as Santa, from head-to-toe, he 
walks in and surprised everyone with a big ho- 
ho-ho. With the excitement in the air, each 
child got to sit on Santa's lap and receive a pre- 
sent. The older children played along with our 
surprise to the end. 

To see the joy in everyones faces made me 
realize why we as parents, try so hard to make 
Christmas a magical time for our children. 




S 



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s 






Want A Holiday Get-away? 






the 
witli our 

3MMdH 









Equity Loan, 




^SESSilMl 



& 



''mi 



First Stote Sank 
of Round Lake 



SERVING THE AREA FOR 

OVER 50 YEARS PLACING 

OUR CUSTOMERS AND 

COMMUNITY FIRST. 





m 

LENDER 



Main Office: 

1777 North Cedar Lake Road 

Round Lake Beach, IL 60073-9905 

Phone (847) 546-2111 

Fax (847) 546-6415 



Branch Office: 

Rte. 134 & Goodnow Blvd. 

Round Lake, IL 60073-0456 

Phone (847) 546-8444 

Fax (847) 546-5090 



BankLine 847-546-4681 www.firststatefinancial.com Member FDIC 




per king-bedded suite 
per night 

• Evening reception With your favorite beverages+ 
frorn 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. 

• Complimentary cooked to order breakfast 

from 8:30 a.m. to 12 noon. 

• Spacious two-room suite with refrigerator, 

microwave, coffee maker and wetbar. 

• Enjoy full use of our, indoor pool, 
whirlpool and exercise room until 11:30 p.m.. 

• Pool re-opens at 7 a.m. 
New Year's Day. 

• Ask about special rates for Dec. 30 ,h & Jan. 1*'; 

• Hilton HHonors* 1 Points and Miles ,M 



/ofr t€delva/wnd> (d 

(847) 945-4500 

or 
1-800-EMBASSY 



m 



www.embassysuiles.com 



EMBASSY SUITES 
H O T E L,® 

Chicago - Norih Shoro/Doeifiald 

U<5 likt C*»k niii. Otiiliill, U BOO 1 5 

MM4S-«0Q 



•Rue fused upon availability. T(H run included. Full payment due al time iirhotAinc. Niwircfundalile deposit 
aficr Dcccmbcf 24, 20(10. Musi he al leusl 21 ycais of age id hook, rcsmatiun and iVrapy risom. +Suhj«ei Id 
Suic and Local Laws. Humus mrmhcijhip, earning u{ poirni and miles and redemnlfan'of puiws «r 
^-^ iuhje ci mill Innnrs Terms and CVndilitws, ©2000 llilion llmpiialiiy. Inc. 



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December 1,2000 



CHRISTMAS MEMORIES 



Lakeland Newspapers/ r C7 




On the Cover: 



..;.'' ■ .-; 






$?; 



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Jilfflisbn Rifill 
Age 3 



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upnee 










<"V**5«lfflfi 



Submitted by 

Miriam Rinaldi 

Gurnee 



Madison is an energetic 3-year-old 
with a great personality. At a young age she 
has become part of a "working family." 
Along with her parents, she too is em- 
ployed. 

Fortunately, Madison has had the 
opportunity to be represented by a few 
modeling/ acting agencies. 

Along with a busy schedule of pre- 
school, dance class and swim lessons, 
we!ve had tosqueeze in time for audi- 
tions. She actually has a lot of fun doing 
this. 

Her first job landed her a print ad 
in the Spiegel Christmas catalog, a 
unique twist to one of our Christmas 
memories. 




Madison flashes the smile that caught advertisers' attention 





Give The Gift Of 
Cherishing Memories 

Lane 







Corner of Rt. 83 & Center St. • Grayslake, IL 

(847* 223-5497 



Open: Mon. - Fri. 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. 
Sat. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. • Sun. 11 a.m.- 4 p. 

www.rudolphsfurniture.com 




Madison helps decorate the family tree. 



A Christmas Memory 

Poor Richard Diesterheft 

Our family was sitting all around the Christmas dinner table. My Grandfa- 
ther said grace and then commented how beautiful the dining room table 
looked, "Like a wonderful painting," he said. 



r 




Do you like showing 

a bumpy trail 

who's the boss? 

The Ski-Doo' MX* Z sled is the ultimate trail machine designed 
for aggressive riders. The suspension is specifically developed for 
bump-absorption and sharp cornering. The MX Z Trail and Standard 
packages feature; 

• Light and agile ZX platform with Rotax twin cylinder power 
•AOSA front suspension and SC-IO II rear suspension for ultimate 

cornering and bump absorption 

• Lightest in class for overall performance 



BOMBARDIER 

RECREATIONAL PRODUCTS 



BOMBARDIER 



R 



on& 



B 




http://www.ron-briansmotorsports.com 



nan's 



VISA 



ggj^ 



1550 Grand Ave. • Waukegan, IL • 847-623-2004 









»#■ ■■■mi 




Q&ILakeland Newspapers 



CHRISTMAS MEMORIES 




Christmas Memories 
from the Doyle family 




Photos submitted by 
Sherry Doyle, Fox Lake ■ 



Rick, Traci, Jordyn & Josh Doyle meet Santa & Mrs. Claus in 
sweatshirts made by Sherry Doyle. 






December J, 2000 



Hi 

Sherry and sister Randi at Christmas, 
1955. 




Sherry's first Christmas with mother Marce. 



Sherry's son Rick's first Christmas, 
1971. 



Dr. Antonio A. Chua Lee 

363 N; Main St., Wadconda 

Specializing In Internal & Geriatric Medicine ! 

Orer 20 years •Primary Care and 
of caring experience Interna] Medicine 
with another location Practice 
inliberfyvUIe ■ ,, ' .' . . 

« i « l.n j * Medicare assignment 
1 Board Certified^ accented 

in Internal Medicine acce P ,Cfl 

and Geriatrics • Managed care & 

♦ Adults and children traditional .health. 
s7&lm : <-:a insurance plans 




755 S. Milwaukee # HO -Liber 

(847) 367- 1755 

Tints. 9>-6 * Tliurfc 9r6 ' 
FrL9-e*Sa!.EK2 



363 NJ Main * Waueonda 
(847> 487-9573 

Mon. 1-6, 



This Holiday 



i 



ECLINER' ROCKING CI1AIR 



Enjoy 

H0U ^fort Season . 

*^* MORALES FURNITURE 

216-218 MAIN STREET (ROUTE 134) 
CIIAiRS • SOFAS' BEDROOMS ROUND LAKE PARK 

I DINING ROOMS & ACCESSORIES (NEXT TO GONZALES GROCERY STORE) 




(847)740-1212 
MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED 



Give your Bathroom a 




for the Holidays 

CUSTOM 

HEAVY GLASS 

ENCLOSURES 



39 S. ROUTE 12 
FOX LAKE 

SHOWROOM ON ROUTE 12 

ACROSS FROM MCDONALD'S 

Fax No.: (847) 587-2241 

TOLL FREE 
1-800-255-0340 

(847) 587-2226 

ififiSTi 



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- 7*m — jim/ — jr^r 



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December 1,2000 



CHRISTMAS MEMORIES 



Lakeland Newspapers/ 09 



i4t 





ft 




When you 
Opens Free Checking Account 

* No Minimum Balance * No Monthly Service Charge 1 

* FREE ATM Access 2 

* FREE First Order Of Checks 
•* FREE Direct Deposit 




Drive-Up 
Hours 

Mon. - Fri. 
8:00 AM - 7:00 PM 

Saturday 
8:00 AM- 1:00 PM 




-S 



P. 





Lobby Hours 

Mon., Tue., Thur. 

9:00 AM - 4:00 PM 
Fri. 9:00 AM- 7:00 PM 
Sat. 9:00 AM- 1:00 PM 

Closed Wednesday 




i 



'<"--' 



k- 



j AND GET A COMPLIMENTARY COPY OF 

| I i§ a Wonderful £$£> 

j When you open a FREE 
Checking Account 

i Just bring in this coupon when opening your account 




J 



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COMMUNITY MINDED CORNER OF 
ROUTE 12 & GRAND AVENUE • FOX LAKE 




CA/H nfiTIOfT 






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EQUAL HOUSING 

LENDER 






EH 




§ m 0«7J£ jl 




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$100.00 to open a checking account. 

1. Special fees such as overdraft charges may apply. 

2. With our ATM card only. Foreign proprietary fees may apply. 

$250.00 to open a savings account. New accounts only. 

This offer is non-transferable. 

A service charge may apply to any account closed before 90 days. 

OFFER EFFECTIVE 12/4/00 








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' 



* 8 * 



Q^OB 





Y&tf£0TO& 




merican Legion 

presents 

Snt., Dec. 2 9am-4prh • Sun., Dec. 3 10am>3pm 
¥ . At The Legion Hall 
\% 515 S. Main St. 




gypr ,T s*\\ 515 S. Main St. **/C*" 'Sjf* 

^Hoine £ Wauconda * Cash * 




^Cooked ,J 
^foodl^ 




i*afflej 



Jf. 



Santa Arrives Sunday December 3" 1 at 1 1 am! 
For More Info Call 526-971 fl 





.'■as 
iSSS 



ISure to Have 
iar Serviced at 

Northwest Motor Co. 

We'll h'elpyou gel 300,000 miles out of your cor 
... ■ 
!^5 We Specialize in Chrysler Products 

1 ZPS2& BWJfc „„ 

JSSS Complete Automotive Services \f& 

tZii _~ *We Repair "Check Engine - Lighls 



5>\ 

555' 

Wa ( 





AOD^iY 



Lake County's Premier Doll, Stuffed 

Animal, Miniature, and Figurine 

shopping experience. All major 

brands available 

and 

the Little Ones are invited to make 

' their wish lists here as we are 

"Authorized Elves" to fill Santa's 

sleigh for our children. 



6695 West Grand Ave. • 
(847) 855-0004 



Gurnee 





airfield Material & 
Supply Company 

Landscape Supplies • Material Sales 



Premiere 



Ice Melter 
With Pro-Tec Plus 

• Will Not Damage Leather Gloves & Footwear 

• Less Corrosion To Concrete and Metal 

• Creates Instant Traction 

• Attacks Ice and Snow Quickly 

• Does Not Contain Calcium Chloride 

• Contains Anli-Caking Agents 

10 N. Fairfield • Round Lake 

(847) 740-3203 £ 

--'■'. ( >'.->/' 



ive a 

Great Lakes Credit Union 
Membership 

All those who live or work in Lake County 
can join. Enjoy high-yield savings, low- 
cost loans, Internet Banking and more! 




% 



Call or Stop by for Details. 



Great Lakes Credit Union 

(847) 578-7000 • 1-800-982-7850 

www.glcu.org 




ottest game of ^^j^Al 
£i the new Millennium: taJ 
Raging Champions 




; lavicted 

K I* 
<LakaViil 

V 11 



Exciting family game for 5 

gears and older. Choose your 

characters and the 

tournament begins! 

On Sale Only sis.ii 

, BAM-JAC 

X. enterprises, inc- . 



To place your order 

call toU free: i-866-BAM-JACi 

Fax US: 1-817-356-6187 

On the web: 
unuw.ragIngchampions.com 




Have Repairs Got You Down? 

Let Jerry's Ingleside Citgo Take The 
Worry Out Of Your Holiday Travel. 





CITGO 




Jerry's 

INGLESIDE^ 

Corner of Rte. 134 & Wilson Rd. 

(847)* 740-9181 



LAKE'S PIZZA 




COUPON 



S'-yoo 



; 2 



i $ 3 



COUPON 



00 



— 1 

I 
ll 



OFF! 



I 



14" or 16" Pizza i 

if i. r „ .ww.oa^ ^v 



18" Pizza 



0» C .. J I « 



faftxn. 



(JAKE 'S P IZZA) 



821 Center St., Grayslake * (847) 548- JAKE ' 
i^.itop 1; ,w.„i,i grft-tfffg (5253) I 




./ 



El Rancho Motel 

Hapjpy s ;Ho>SMays: Fir«i>m: 
Sanmdyr&iMatt 

Twenty One Units In Beautifully Wooded Area 
Close To Greaf*liakod , & Gurnee Mills 
Kitchenettes 4M>e HBO & ESPN 

El Ramtxo "Motel 



VISA 



■J 





m 



-5237 |^i 



Located At Intersection Rto. 41 & Rto. 21, Gurnee 






__eed Advice V 
Annuity Owners 

How Lond Has It Been Since You Had * Comprehend ve 
Review or Your Annuity! Here are some or the questions 
you should consider: Are you stuck In annuities with high 
penalties! Is your performance lagglngl Do you have a 
nursing-care waiver! Do you have penalty-free cumulative 
withdrawals! Is your portfolio asset-allocated! Let us answer 
your questions. Contact Ann Donkl for a free comprehensive 
review to compare your current annuity to today's Industry 
standards. Call (S4.7) 500-4.9 13 for an appointment, or for 
written Information, email your name, address and phone 
number lo ariorafclCflrstuntool.com. -»ioSlC I* 

Ana Donkl. finu«r(ul /tilvhar rflRlON 

5101 Wuhinjslbn Rd, Cum«, IL WW31 




4 



Skopek 

RTHODONTIC 

For Your 



t»<ryHll-« 



^nu h^, t Hit 14 It. ii ii (If ml lulHl*. m tin 11 M*^- *nu| ■iiln*i m-< inlllns>lii'; 

noi I'mc: INHIHIUI3/Nari' hank cijakanim-.d/may mjku vaiih. 



'■■ j« i. - -., ., -J. A iirf* i*, un fl .(i •!. k..,^v ' . ^ 1 ■■» L>*-M •*[**<**-*■ jtij.riirl KkVtarhn Vl m*4>4> m J 
■*!.:■> !.!■* ■I.«'|}l,i,.|..iIi,»^i. ■■!,lnr.i#.r<. ! i.i ill niuMMMUfts* »**■"••« \*ft^4 ■ ■*»•" ** Itrffcf*-* 

l,i>>!iil"iJ.i 1* r-J.f. l« 1-...4 ■-.<■ \*.r'.J-|» J- tf* i .Or.^i lU 4$ W fL» I--I ' . I "t I j I i'">. 1i.*j*«- 

*r*l|T*> |**p,ik<-*Ji f*i*« kMiAiiA **■• wi^v« l«* I M«^iuir« li« UntlSYil --1 ---It f>4 



**t Stfi^ e 




Skopek Orj^oi^tlw 



rlia«lua 

444 Norlli Huiil Kwul ' 
VUUrc Bank and TruM DulldiiiK 

North iiJiTiiinloii. IIILiuk 60UIU 



Please call us al (847) 277-1212 for more informal Ion. J 




umlif 





V- 



■I 



1-800-686-3637 

www.power-now.com 



Suburban 

Fantiiy 



Each Month In Your 
V J-ocal Lakeland Newspape r 




4' 







%n'i' ( &elay . . 

Gel your photo greeting cards 
next day! 

SAVE 15% 

WITH THIS AD. 

Rose 

IMAGING 

34409.N. Old Walnut Circle 
Gurnee. Illinois 6003 1 

847/548-6200 

... . 

f;Phdl6' Processing • Custom Framing • Digital Reproduction 





Cut Your Own • $33-838 And Up 



Wagon Wde Qn^J^ttf^^^^Jttptag ' 
Weekends ^%>^u^hmii^^^: Centerpieces 
Shaking v *0$T&cja§> 

Baling '£0M' 

9407 RichardsoniBdii SpringGroue 

Near Wisconsin' Border - watch for signs 

Along RL 12 {6 mies west ot Fw Lake) brRL 173(6 mies wca of Antkxti) 











Flags & Flagpol 



Holiday Gift Ideas? 

Toland Art ;"& Garden Fiags 



Stop in or check us out on the web! 

-i. 1224 North Ave. cfcjj* 
T 4 Waukecjan, IL 60035^ 

647-623-3524 www.kflag.com 




Dance! 

Now Registering For January Classes! 

# Dancercize # Ballet 
^ Tumbling * Tap 
*Jazz ♦Poms 

.^P ELL'S DANC^ 
H5 ACADEMY «» 

130 Washington, Ingleside 

y 587-qi61 

. ^/^ 






USH OVER TO 
AND DINETTES FOR 
EAl HOLIDAY SAVINGS 



DINETTES! STOOLS! 



Over 3S Yaarc Offering 

Lowest Prices) 

Lars sst Selection 



HUGE SELCaiON 
Or ALL WOOD 
DINETTE SET5 , 






FREE DELIVERY 



• Cutiom UrakutH Tibln Plus - Our UiaHnxim diiplnji ■ hut? tHrcllun 

C0R1AIT. Cmrak TUf, Cr»nllf , 0.1 »nd Clui rf bunlnul, and wuii dinlns lumllurr. 

♦ CinlomBaUlConwNooV*. FAST AND LOW COST 

HEUPIIOLSTEKT SERVICE AS ALWAYS 



Ettobtlthsd 1S72 

1011 N. Band Rood • HI. 13 (flnnd) and Rl. 00 (Dundee) • Palallno 

Phono (047) 350-1414 

vvww r riificJcJlnf*t1o«.com 

Men. * Tub.. 1O.B:30l Wed. 10-5:30: Thura. A F.I. l OE 10; 

Sat. 10 5: Sunday* 11-B • Fntt OEtlVERY 




Mk, Statue^ 
Sweatshirts U Silver 



Great Selection of 

Gifts for the Horse 

Lover You Know! 

... - (including yourself!} 

Timmermann's 

Ranch Sr Saddle Shop 

Check it Out! 

29550 W. Roberts, Island Lake 

526-8066 




At-'- 

*0m 



~^y. 






hunderin 
Mountain 

Indian Hand Craft 

Native American Unique Gifts, 
Crafts, Art, Jewelry, Supplies, 
and Much More! 
Native American Owned and Operated 

Laya-way plan available • Major Credit Cards Accepted 

Store Hours: Wed. 12-6, Thurs. & Fri. 12-7, 
Sat. 10-5, Sun. 1-5, Closed Mon. &Tues. 

E-Mail: wlb99@megslnot.net 

3452 - 5E Sheridan Road 
Zloii, IL 60099 

(847) 746-5797 




Scrubs 4 Shoes ♦ Lab Coats 

Warm Up Jackets ♦ Sport Scrubs 

Stethoscopes 4 Blood Pressure Sets 4 Aprons 

Vests ♦ Pants ♦ Tuxedo Shirts ♦ Skirts 

Blouses ♦ rood Service & Chef Apparel 

ACCENT UNIFORMS 

505 Orchard Street • Antioch 

847-395-4570 

■ Store Hours: Wed & Fri, itam-S.OOpm, 
Thursday 11am-6:30pm and Sat. 10am-2pm 



girls in glasses 

get framed by jl 





Man:/ 



Vna Cemfr L">dfvr4 7ii>»t 



tOt Center St. 

548-2770 

"Downtown Gruystulte 
www. uiUaueuision. com 



J 




aucoiida 
Park District 



Tree Lighting Ceremony 

December 1 , 2000 

6:15 p.m. Festivities Begin 

6:30 p.m. Tree Lighting 

6:45 Peace Pledge at Village Hall 

6:45-8:30 p.m. Visit with Santa 

Ceremony will take place 

at Memorial Park 

Chamber of Commerce & 

Village of Wauconda 



-TRA 

CAU TODAY - MOHEV TODAY! 

MO CREDIT CHECKS! 

IS MINUTE LOAMSI 




ADVANCE ON 

PERSONAl., 

CHECKS. 



ON CAR 
- VOL! 
KEEP THE CAR 



CHECK 
CASHING 



RIA ENVIA 

MONEY 

-TRANSFERS 



PAYDAY LOAMS - POSTDATED CHECKS 

839 W. Rollins Rd • Round Lake Beach 

(847) 546-5958 




\m\ Cum Mi? 
Hiik h 





H 



Anliocli News, Fox Lake Press, Grayslake Times, 

Gurnee Press, Lake Villa Record, 

Libertyville News, Litidenhursl News, 

Mundclcin News, Round Lake News, Wadsworth News, 

W auconda Leader + 

NEWSPAPERS > 





ip on Over to 






mi 



Whistle Stop Cafe on 

your way to shopping 

for the holidays. 



A warm friendly atmosphere, Railroad Decor, and a 
Variety of Delicious Home Cooked Foods including: 

• Authentic Meilcan Food * Fresh Baked Hems 
Children's Menu • Specialty Coffee Flavor of the Day 

15 E. GRAND AVENUE • FOX LAKE \ 



■ 



-J 

m 

1 



■ ■ . - - ■ » 



-.01 2/Lakeland Newspapers 



CHRISTMAS MEMORIES 



December 1,2000 



. 




Continued from page 5 
caring adult volunteers. 1 

If you are interested in being a Big Brother or Big Sister, call to set up a time 
for an initial orientation to answer your questions. You are under no obligation 
to apply. There are also other volunteer opportunities available. Contact the 
agency for details. 

The organization is located in Gurnee and serve all of Lake County. 

Individuals are needed to "experience the difference." There are many Lake 
County kids still waiting for a Big Brother or Sister— and the need keeps on grow- 
ing. Call the number provided above or e-mail today. 



Helping Hands Resale Store and Help Center 

284 Main St., Suite 3, Antioch, IL 60002 
Phone: (847) 838-5150 

The Helping Hands resale store assists families and seniors with non-food 
items needed for everyday living. We are currently accepting consignments, 
donations or garage sale leftovers. Call the number above for details or pick-ups. 
Please help us to make life easier for those not able to make ends meet; 

Hours are as follows: Mon., Wed., Thurs. & Sat. 10 a.m.-G p.m.: Fri. 10 a.m.- 
8 p.m.; Sun. Noon-6 p.m.; Closed on Tues. 

Save-A-Barn 

5603 RFD, Long Grove, IL 60047 

Save-A-Barn hotline: (847) 913-9464 during the week from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 

Save-A-Barn was established in 1998 by local resident Nancy Burgess in an 
effort to raise money to provide grants to barn owners to help save the older barns 
in Lake County. Money is raised through the sale of merchandise related to the 
barns in Lake County, donations, and eventually the sale of the book, "The Barns 

Continued on page 13 







mh Amid Super Wash® Holiday Promotion 




^CTWinneps Of 
$1000 Cash Each! 



No Purchase 
Necessary to 

Register. 



10 Winners Of 
5 Tokens Each! 

(ot each porticipotinq wnsh) 

soveontdenpjrchxs 3 Winners Of A Vacation Getaway! 

from November 17 Each Winner May Choose 1 of 3 Trips Shown! (a ttxo «m 

1 Hrough January 7, 2001. All Ir'fS rtfctfc 3 lights end or fort Vocation nnxrs W eptw to choou tfOOQ cash. 



Super Wash® 

Tokens Make Great 

Christmas Gifts! 

On Sale Now 4 for $10 
or 10 for $25 With 

a Free Pen. 



Fox Lake 
Super Wash 

587-9507 

Corner of Rollins 4 
Washington, 

(across from Dog A Suds) 

Ingleside, IL 60041 



When 



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Bridgeview Bank | Group 

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Lincolnshire 

430 N. Milwaukee Ave. 
(847) 634-9500 



Beach Park 

11411 W, Wadsworth Road 
(847)336-1800 



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ate -Wight Shopping 





sm 

These area merchants invite you to bring your Holiday 
Shopping list to them for everything you'll need during 

the gift-giving season. Stop by and enjoy the convenience 

arid charm of o 





Faux Finishes , . 

Furniture 
Custom Florals 



Draperies 

DirmCwerc 
Slipcorcrs 



DESIGN CENTER 

Wallpaper 'Fabric 1 Design ■ Gifts 
Home Accessories • Corporate • Residential Design 



(847) 543-8812 

Goffldct LiWd Qmti for Moiiie Qmukim 

148 Center Street, Downtown Grayslake 

Unique gifts available! 



V Open; Thurs. 10-8 »M,Tu,W,F 10-5 • K t 
Sat 11-5, Sunl-4 



•■> 



r» 









Colonel Carter'* MmtMnt. 




141 Center Street 
Grayslake, IL 

(847) 548-9315 

Mon. & Tues. - Closed 

Wed. & Thurs. - 11-6 

X Fri. - 11-7 • Sat. 10-5 • Sun. 12-5 Af 




♦•■» 



HOURS 

MON-THURS1MC 

Fill 11-11 

SAT 9-11 

SON 9-9 % f 

r* 




A 



HClfYOURPCT 
LOOK HIS 




Great gifts for 

you and your 

furry .or 

feathered loved 

ones 



Canine Clippers 
& Pet Supplies 

250 Center Street Grayslake, IL 
(847) 223-5444 

Closed Sun. & Mon, 

Open: Toes., Wed., Fri., Sat. 8-5;30pm 

X Thursday 6 pm X 




H www.TheCottageHouse.com u # 






Art ii Blooms, Inc. 

- Fhe floral Designs 

- United Edkxi Prirts 




- Custom Framing 



ftl Certer 
Grayslake, I 

888-2024879 



v 



M I W, F S-530 

Open late Ih 9pm 

Sat 9430 




December 1, 2000 



-..«* -V,.' | .-■ 



O 




Children's Specialty Shop 

134 Center St. 

Downtown Grayslake 

223-6005 



:i 




Hours: Uonday-Frkfay 14-6; 
Saturday ia-s; Closed Sunday. 



:! 










♦ ♦♦ 






Continued from page 12 

of Lake County." 

The dream is to open a 'real barn' 
museum for children to explore and expe- 
rience a true feel for rural life. Save-A-Barn 
hopes that one day this working farm will 
also help the community by providing shel- 
ter and work experi- 
ence for needy 
women, providing 
meals for the hungry 
and sanctuary for 
those who need it. If 
you would be interested in supporting this 
endeavor please call the number above. 

Any donations are tax-deductible and 
welcomed gratefully, 

Arden Shore Child & Family 
Service 

935 Lake view Parkway, Suite 105 , Vemon 
Hills, IL 60025 
Phone: (847) 549-1730 
Fax: (847) 549-1731 

The mission, of Arden Shore is to 
rebuild abused and neglected children's 
lives in a caring community. They believe 
that children have a right to grow in a struc- 
tured, safe and nurturing environment, 
children and their families have a right and 
an obligation to participate actively in the 
treatment plan, children and families have 
strengths and it is Arden Shore's responsi- 
bility to create an environment which rec- 
ognizes, encourages and enhances those 
strengths, the diversity of children, families 
staff and volunteers enriches and strength- 
ens their services. 

Tutors, mentors and various volun- 
teers are needed on an ongoing basis. 

Family Network, Inc. 

Contact: Ms. Linda Wehrheim 

330 Laurel Avenue, Highland Park, IL 60035 

Phone: (847) 433-0377 

Fax: (847) 433-0461 

The mission of Family Network Inc. is 
to strengthen families with children (from 
birth through three years of age) by provid- 
ing parent support, social and educational 
programs, and child development activi- 
ties. 

Holiday Gift Providers are needed to 
adopt a family (Hispanic) and provide gifts. 
This job can be done by an adult. Though 
it's a one-time event, the need is ongoing 
from holiday season to season. The organi- 
zation also has other opportunities for vol- 
unteering. For details, call the number 
above. 

Liberty Prairie Conservancy 

32400 North Harris Road, Grayslake, 

IL 60030 

Phone: (847) 548-5989 

Fax: (847) 548-7592 

E-Mail: info@libertyprairie.org 

Web: www.libertyprairie.org/ 

Volunteers help Liberty Prairie Conser- 
vancy's mission to protect, restore, and pre- 
serve the prairies, oak savannahs, farmland, 
forest land, wetlands, streams and scenic 
properties on the Liberty Prairie Reserve. 

Formed by area residents in 1994, the 
LPC works to enhance the integrity of the 
area through community outreach, stew- 
ardship, education, and the promotion of 
environmental ethics in Lake County. 

The Conservancy focuses on fostering a 
better understanding of this cultural and 
natural landscape and focuses on encourag- 
ing growth management that will enable this 
heritage to prevail for future generations. 

Continued on page 1 7 



i 



_ ....,'. HHW 



. 



-;C1 2,/Lakeland Newspapers 



CHRISTMAS MEMORIES 



December 1,2000 




Continued from page 5 
caring adult volunteers. . 

If you are interested in being a Big Brother or Big Sister, call to set up a time 
for an initial orientation to answer your questions. You are under no obligation 
to apply. There are also other volunteer, opportunities available. Contact the 
agency for details. 

The organization is located in Gurnee and serve all of Lake County. 

Individuals are needed to "experience the difference." There are many Lake 
County kids still waiting for a Big Brother or Sister— and the need keeps on grow- 
ing. Call the number provided above or e-mail today. 



Helping Hands Resale Store and Help Center 

284 Main St., Suite 3, Antioch, IL 60002 
Phone:(847)838-5150 

The Helping Hands resale store assists families and seniors with non-food 
items needed for everyday living. We are currently accepting consignments, 
donations or garage sale leftovers. Call the number above for details or pick-ups. 
Please help us to make life easier for those not able to make ends meet: 

Hours are as follows: Mon., Wed., Thurs. & Sat. 10 a.in.-6 p.m.: Fri. 10 a.m.- 
8 p.m.; Sun. Noon-6 p.m.; Closed on Tues. 

Save-A-Barn 

5603 RFD, Long Grove, IL 60047 

Save-A-Barn hotline: (847) 913-9464 during the week from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 

Save-A-Barn was established in 1998 by local resident Nancy Burgess in an 
effort to raise money to provide grants to barn owners to help save the older barns 
in Lake County. Money is raised through the sale of merchandise related to the 
barns in Lake County, donations, and eventually the sale of the book, "The Barns 

Continued on page 13 




12tk Anmal Super MM Holiday Promotion 




jmmrs Of 
$1000 Cash Each! 



No Purchase 
NeceuarytD 
Register I 



10 Winners Of 
5 Tokens Each! 

£2E£1 3 Winners Of A Vacation Getaway! 

from November 17 Each Winner May Choose 1 of 3 Trips Shown! (« *!W«**) 
through January 7. 2001 Afttrifsnljit 3 nights end trftrt VacolMwirershartcptmlochxstttOCOiiish. 



Super Wash® 
Tokens Make Great 
•Christmas Gifts! 

On Sale Now 4 for $10 

or 10 for $25 With 

a Free Pen. 



Fox Lake 
Super Wash 

* 
587-9507 

Corner of Rollins A 
Washington, 

(across from Dog A Suds) 

"lngleside.IL 60041. 



l;:[i::p:i:4::i:i::i:i:i.::L.!...;.4...}-4.|" 

When good just isn't good enough! 

Many banks offer a good rate on their FDIC insured Money Market accounts. At 

Bridgeview Bank we took good one step further. Our Money Market PLUS provides 

FDIC insurance up to $100,000.00, easy access to your money, and a GREAT rale 

that sets us apart from all the rest. Call or stop in today! 

www.bridgev iewbank.com 

Bridgeview Bank j Group 

Your Bridge to Community Banking 

Lincolnshire Beach Park 

430 N. Milwaukee Ave. 1 141 1 W. Wadsworth Road 

(847)634-9500 (847)336-1800 

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B S B UJIR€L€SS 

COMMUNICATION 

DEPOT 



K(s. 176 & S3 

(Next to Taco Bell) 

Munckldn 

837-8383 




(("« ii.niM \,<n Mil wmr TVl 



I 





.«: 



mg 




These area merchants invite you to bring your Holiday 
Shopping list to them for everything you'fl need during 

the gift-giving season. Stop by and enjoy the convenience 

and charm of o^downto^ 



WEST 



KokhIu 



ii milo\ 




Dpi J 111* 



BJrringlofl 




Cook Canity 



loChkJSO 



Colonel fa ia't jtletrtiantile, 3nc. 



. : 



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141 Center Street 
Grayslake, IL 

(847)548-9315 

Mon. & Tuei. - Closed 

Wed. & Thurs. ■ 11-6 

X Frl. ■ 11-7 • Sat. 10-5 - Sun. 12-5 >f 




December 1, 2000 



C13 



X www.TheCottageHouse,com 









„--i> 





Arf'nBl 



•c» 






HOURS 
MOH-THURS 1M0 
FtUIMl 
SAT 9-11 
SUN 99 ^f 

r* 




ooms 



- Rne RbralDestgns 

- IMed Edtbn \ Frits 
- Custom Framing 



2W Center 
Gray&ke, L 
8f7-5f8-fSO 
8881024879 

k I w, F 9-530 
Open /ate Ih 9pm 
Sat 9430 





Faux Finishes.. 
Furniture 
Custom Florals 



Draperies 

DuvelCcrai 

Slipcovers 



DESIGN CENTER 

Wallpaper • Fabric •Design* Gifts 

Home Accessories • Corporate • Residential Design 

Linens • Bedspreads 

(847)543-8812 

Gon'&icl LB] GoM\ for Mom Omimm 

148 Center Street, Downtown Grayslake 
Unique gifts available! 



s, Open: Thurs. 10-8 • M, Tu. r W, F 10-5 • V 
X Sat 11-5, Sunl4 r> 




HCIP VOUR PCT 

LOOK HIS 




Great gifts for 

you and your 

furry or 

feathered loved 

ones 



Canine Clippers 
& Pet Supplies 

250 Center Street Grayslake, IL 
(847) 223-5444 



Closed Son. & Mon, 
Open: Tues., Wed., Fri., Sat. 8-5:30pm 

Thursday 6 pm 




1 



Children's Specialty Shop 
134 Center St. 

Downtown Grayslake 

(OT7) 223-6005 

Hours: Monday-Friday 10-6; 

Saturday ih; CM Sunday. 






Continued from page 12 

of Lake County." 

The dream is to open a 'real barn' 
museum for children to explore and expe- 
rience a true feel for rural life. Save-A-Barn 
hopes that one day this working farm will- 
also help the community by providing shel- 
ter and work experi- 
' ence for needy 
women, providing 
meals for the hungry 
and sanctuary for 
those who need it. If 

you would be interested in supporting this 
endeavor please call the number above. 

Any donations are tax-deductible and 
welcomed gratefully. 

Arden Shore Child & Family 
Service 

935 Lakeview Parkway, Suite 105 , Vernon 
Hills, IL 60025 
Phone: (847) 549-1730 
Fax:(847)549-1731 

The mission, of Arden Shore is to 
rebuild abused and neglected children's 
lives in a caring community. They believe 
that children have a right to grow in a struc- 
tured, safe and nurturing environment, 
children and their families have a right and 
an obligation to participate actively in the 
treatment plan, children and families have 
strengths and it is Arden Shore's responsi- 
bility to create an environment which rec- 
ognizes, encourages and enhances those 
strengths, the diversity of children, families 
staff and volunteers enriches and strength- 
ens their services. 

Tutors, mentors and various volun- 
teers are needed on an ongoing basis. 

Family Network, Inc. 

Contact: Ms. Linda Wehrheim 

330 Laurel Avenue, Highland Park, IL 60035 

Phone: (847) 433-0377 

Fax: (847) 433-0461 

The mission of Family Network Inc. is 
to strengthen families with children (from 
birth through three years of age) by provid- 
ing parent support, social and educational 
programs, and child development activi- 
ties. 

Holiday Gift Providers are needed to 
adopt a family (Hispanic) and provide gifts. 
This job can be done by an adult. Though 
it's a one-time event, the need is ongoing 
from holiday season to season. The organi- 
zation also has other opportunities for vol- 
unteering. For details, call the number 
above. 



Liberty Prairie Conservancy 

32400 North Harris Road, Grayslake, 

IL 60030 

Phone: (847) 548-5989 . 

Fax: (847) 548-7592 

E-Mail: info@libertyprairie.org 

Web: www.libertyprairie.org/ 

Volunteers help Liberty Prairie Conser- 
vancy's mission to protect, restore, and pre- 
serve the prairies, oak savannahs, farmland, 
forest land, wetlands, streams and scenic 
properties on the Liberty Prairie Reserve. 

Formed by area residents in 1994, the 
LPC works to enhance the integrity of the 
area through community outreach, stew- 
ardship, education, and the promotion of 
environmental ethics in Lake County. 

The Conservancy focuses on fostering a 
better understanding of this cultural and 
natural landscape and focuses on encourag- 
ing growth management that will enable this 
heritage to prevail for future generations. 

Continued on page 1 7 



o 



.1 ._ r „.-.„- 



-•-;,]-_ „_ 



I .U .. . *rx. . *.l *«-■,.**,•-. •-.'*, ■ - . 




1 »-^ r ,"> ---v. 



' C 1 4 f Lakeland Newspapers 



CHRISTMAS MEMORIES 



December 1,2000 




KK 



Fine art gifts for everyone! 

Hundreds of fine arts by Lake County 
artists at affordable prices! 

Pottery • Wearable Art • Jewelry 
Paintings • Photography and more! 

College off Lake County 
Dec. 2-5 • Gallery Atrium 

19351 West Washington St., Grayslake, Illinois 
Call 847-543-2405 for information. 




Dec 2 
Dec. 3 
Dec 4-5 



9 am to 4:30 pm 
I to 5 pm 
9 am to 9 pm 



Tarin Marchetta with Santa - Photos submitted by Tammy 
Marchetta, Vernon Hills 



Clicks and bricks enhance 
holiday shopping in Long Grove 



Long Grove, honored by the White House 
as a "Millennium Village," is a place to step 
back in time and also discover through cyber- 



GRAND OPENING! 

Hooterville 

Christmas Tree Farm 
(847) 395-4424 





><-■ 



OPEN: Fri.-Sat.-Sun.Bcginning Nov. 24th 
HOURS: 9am 'til 5:00pm 



Fresh-Cut Fraser Firs 
inside the Tree Barn. 
Wreaths & Firewood 
Bundles. 

Warm up by the Fireplace 
in Our Christmas Craft 
and Gift Shop. Visit with 
Santa! Ride the 
Haywagon! 

Stop by Mrs. Klaus' 
Kitchen for cocoa, cider, 
chili, hot dogs & more! 
Free Coffee! 



Pony Rides & Petting Zoo 

On Saturday Dec* 2, llam-3pm 



fff. 17? 





4 



s 



i 



' * 



OflAULMUflO. 



WASHIHOfW 



MUlVfttt 



CJWIUArt. 



OJIHEI 

Ul -J 



VH 



■ 



Located on N. Beck Rtl,, Lake Villa 

1/2 Mile W. of RL 45 off Grasslakc Rd. 

Look for the Covered Bridge! 



Wise men gather their 

gifts of the season at 

Leider's Garden Greenery. 



What would the holidays be like without the 

vibrant color and majesty of poinsettia plants? Whether 
they are placed at an entry way or as a centerpiece, as hearth decor or 

Christmas tree accompa- 
niment, poinsettias are a 
beautiful way to make the 
holidays festive. These 
plants are also great gifts 
for that special hostess, 
faithful friends, and those 
relatives we greet during 
the season. • 



Our poinsettia plants are 
grown right in the green- 
house, for outstanding 
quality and color clarity 

to stay healthy all 

through the holidays and 

well into the new year. 

Stop in and see our 

display of red, white 

and pink plants. 





space. Visitors to the historic shopping village 
will experience an old fashioned Countryside 
Christmas Celebration running now through 
December 24, featuring shops housed in dec- 
orated Victorian buildings, a landmark cov- 
ered bridge, lighted brick walkways, weekend 
carolers, breakfast and lunch with Santa, and ' 
horse-drawn carriages, New this holiday sea- 
son, shoppers can also lake a "virtual visit" and 
plan their trip to Long Grove by clicking on 
www.longgrovconline.com. 

The colorful, user friendly web site posts 
the names of nearly 90 shops and restaurants, 
a detailed map of the village, a merchant on 
line directory, a history of the village, and in- 
formation on all special events and festivals. 
Those who log on can receive site updates and 
sign up for mailing lists. 

Holiday visitors, virtual and actual, will be 
in for a treat with "Da Moose on the Loose in 
Long Grove!" Artistically decorated, sculptured 
steel moose will appear throughout the village 
by November 16. Thirty shops will sponsor 
these whimsical creatures, and will auction 
them off, with proceeds benefiting a variety of 
charities, such as Make-A-Wish Foundation of 
Northern Illinois, Cancer Research, and Illinois 
Fire Safety Alliance Burn Camp. 

Countryside Christmas hours are 10 a.m." 
to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday; and 11 
a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sundays. Many shops will be 
open Thursdays until 8 p.m. beginning No- 
vember 16 through Thursday, December 21. 
Formore information, phone634 -0000 orclick 
on www.longroveonline.com. 



lEIDERS 

GARDEN GREENERY INC. 



Located in Grayslake on the corner of 
Rte. 83 and Lake Street 

(847)223-2422 



HOURS: 
Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; 
Sat & Sun., 9 am to 5 p.m. 



* - • j h . t t, * . 



» 4 * ■ .fc -** t - » « 





I •- 



a 



December 1,2000 



CHRISTMAS MEMORIES 



Lakeland Newspapers/ ',015 ^ 




Pizza *Ribs 
Dinners •Sandwiches 



Thin. Crust: Pizza 

2 Toppings with Garlic Bread 
■ft: I Liter of RC 

+ tax v 




Gabti Ptow 740-4222 

Mdtllonil topfAig* «!ral Mrt wMwtihBny.ottMfoffflr, 
1 coupon p«f cvnorivof . Umlnd Unw ofl*r, 




133 L Main St. Rt. 134 
Round Lake Park 

14/E 
DELIVER 



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Galad Pizza 7404222 

Addition*, topper* •»«, Ikil vtSd Tnltn erry ottw oflor 
1 coupon pweu»wni»f. tlirtlscl tin* cJt«r. 



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. G»l*d PI«a 74£M 2 11 

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with 2 Toppings 8t 
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plus 1 Topping & 
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$^KT99 



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Galad Pizza 740-4222 

AdaiUonat topping* ■*»..■ Nd V»W wWi uiy citw oRci- 




847*740»4222 



Mon.-Thurs. 3 p.m. lo 1 1 p.m. • Tri. - Saturday 3 p.m. to 12 a.m. • Sunday 3 p.m. to 10 p.m. 




ROUND LAKE AREA 

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE & INDUSTRY 



Ik 



1777 N. Cedar Lake Road, Round Lake Beach 
(847)546-2002 





For the local crafter, 
show visitor and collector - 

The Midwest Country Peddler has something for everyone 




From local exhibits and 

clubs to the larger shows 

and collectors societies, 

the Midwest Country 

Peddler gives you monthly 

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CHRISTMAS MEMORIES 



December 1, 2000 



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December 1, 2000 



CHRISTMAS MEMORIES 



Lakeland Newspapers) 'Gl 7 ■£ 



Continued from page 13 

Lake County Haven 

P.O. Box 127 vLibertyville, IL 60048 
Phone: (847) 680-5408 
Fax: (847) 680-4360 

The Lake County Haven is a social service agencydedicated to meeting the 
needs of homeless women and children and using education, employment and 
life-skills training to help give them the opportunities necessary to make life 
changes which lead to independence. 

A recent volunteer posting reads as follows: Volunteers are needed to assist in 
all aspects of the shelter's activities. Volunteers can alsp help with evening child care 
or as a handyperson to provide very limited shelter maintenance jobs. Training will 
be provided. This is an ongoing volunteer opportunity. Times needed are flexible. 

A Holiday Open House will beheld on Friday, Dec. 1 from 4-7 p.m. This event 
is a great way to see the facilities, meet the board and staff and learn about how 
homelessness affect women and children in Lake County and what The Haven is 
doing about it. RSVP to celebrate the season, call (847) 680-5408. 

Lake County Literacy Program 

•College of Lake County Literacy Office 

Building Four 

19351 W. Washington St., Grayslake, IL 60030 

Phone: (847) 543-2024 

• Waukegan Public Library Literacy Office 

128 N. County St., Waukegan, 1LG0085 

Phone: (847) 623-9261 

Web: www.nsn.org/wkkhome/lclp/lclpweb.html 

The mission of the Lake County Literacy Program is to extend educational 
opportunities to Lake County adult students and their families. The Lake 
County Literacy Program designs an individualized edu- 
cation plan based on assessment, student goals, and abil- 
ities. The program trains and supports tutors who volun- 
teer their services to assist students in developing basic 
English communication skills in reading, writing and 
mathematics. 

There is always a need for volunteer tutors to help oth- 
ers learn to read. Training is provided for all basic reading 
and English as a second language tutors. Please call (847) 
543-2024 or (847) 623-9261 for more information. To re- 
ceive a registration packet please Call Marsha Thompson 
at 543-2024 or e-mail MThompson@clc.cc.il. us; and include your name, address, 
home and work phone numbers and' designate the training (Basic Reading or 
English as a Second Language) you are interested in. 




If you would like to volunteer in another capacity, call one of the offices for 
more information on available opportunities. 

Make-A-Wish Foundation of Northern Illinois 

640 N. LaSalle St., Suite 280, Chicago, IL 60610 

Phone:(312)943-8956 

Fax: (312)-943-9813 

The Make-A-Wish Foundation exists to fulfill the dreams and wishes of 

Continued on page 18 




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•& C1 8 /Lakeland Newspapers 



CHRISTMAS MEMORIES 



December 1, 2000 









Area Agency 

O N * 

AGIIMC3 



Continued from page 1 7 

seriously ill children and to make life a little brighter for many families. The group 
provides hope, strength and joy during a very difficult time in a child's life. Fam- 
ilies often remark that the wish experience empowers their children and becomes 
a sort of emotional treatment for the child's illness. The most common illnesses 
are leukemia, cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy, genetic disorders and AIDS. 

Make-A-Wish of America has fulfilled 80,000 wishes worldwide since its in- 
ception in 1980. The local, northern Illinois chapter has fulfilled 3,000 of those 
wishes to children in the 24 northern-most counties of Illinois. 

Monetary donations are always welcome. Also sought after is the donation 
of frequent flyer miles for air travel. These miles help to fund the travel of chil- 
dren and their families. The McDonald's corporation and its employees recent- 
ly donated more than 2 million miles to the Make-A-Wish Foundation of North- 
ern Illinois. 

To find out more about Make-A-Wish and how you can help, call (312) 943- 
8956. 

Northeast Illinois Area Agency on Aging 

Field office: 245 West Roosevelt Rd. 

Bldg. 6, Units 41-43, West Chicago, IL 60185 

Phone: (630) 293-5990 

Fax: (630) 293-7488 

Web: www.ageguide.org 

The Northeastern Illinois Area Agency on Aging is a non-profit organization 
responsible for developing and coordinating a network of services for older per- 
sons throughout an eight county area of Northeastern Illinois, including Lake and 

McHenry counties. 

For over twenty five years, Northeastern Illi- 
nois Area Agency on Aging has developed and 
coordinated services that enable older per- 
sons to live independently in their own 
homes. The agency is committed to enhanc- 
ing the quality of life for an aging society. 
There are many ways for you to become in- 
volved, ways as varied and unique as the contributions you can make. Become a 
Medicare-fraud buster in Operation Restore Trust, help deliver weekend or hoi-- 
iday meals to homebound elders, support fund-raising events or become a Board 
or Advisory Council member. 

Please call the toll-free Support Line at 1-800-528-2000 (8:30 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m.) ore-mail info@ageguide.org for more information on how you can help. 

Salvation Army 

Regional Office 

5040 N. Pulaski Road, Chicago, IL 60630 

Phone:(312)725-1100 

Web: www.salvationarmy.org 

Internationally, The Salvation Army works in just over 100 countries using 
more than 140 languages. There are over 14,000 Corps (centres for worship) as 
well as a wide range of social, medical, educational and other community ser- 
vices. The group is known for its far-reaching assistance to individuals in need. 
There are several area thrift stores that help to fund the programs of the Sal- 
vation Army. There is one located in Waukegan at 133 S. Genesee, call 623-6170 
for details. There is also one in Gurnee at 3521 Grand Avenue, call 336-8857 for 
more information. 

For pick-up service of donated goods, call (847) 662-7730. 

C.O.O.L. Food Pantry & Transitional Housing Program 

C.O.O.L. OFFICE 

,658 Grand Ave., Waukegan, IL 60085 
Phone:(847)662-1230 
Web: www.coolministries.org/ 

Christian Outreach of Lutherans (C.O.O.L.) is a not-for-profit organization 
created to provide food and housing for the hungry and homeless in Lake 
County, Illinois and surrounding communities. An Open House will be held on 
Sat, Dec. 9 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. for anyone wishing to learn about volunteer 
opportunities. For info., call the Pantry Manager at (847) 662-1230, 

Tire C.O.O.L Food Pantry's front door, at 127 West Water Street in Waukegan, 
Illinois was opened by six local Lutheran churches in 1983. A 
small staff and daily volunteers serve clients. 

The Pantry supplies four days of emergency food to 
clients who are referred by area agencies and churches. The 
Food Pantry helps people who are encountering a life crisis 
and are without adequate emergency resources. 

The hours are Mon. and Wed. from 2-6 p.m., and Tues., 
Thurs. and Fri. from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. 

A donation of $30 will feed a family of four for four days. $100 will feed twelve 
individuals for four days. Please help the Food Pantry by sending donations to 
the address provided above. 

The Pantry appreciates financial donations, large and small, which are tax 
deductible. Also welcome are volunteers to shop for and transport food, bag 
groceries, and serve clients in the Food Pantry, Monday-Friday 10a.m.-2p.m. 

Those who organize and participate in local church and business food 
drives as well as those who join a local CROP Walk are also greatly appreciated. 




The Transitional Housing Program also run by C.O.O.L. was created in 1988 
to provide rent and utility-free housing units to those in transition toward self- 
sufficiency. Transitional Housing provides six to twelve months support for 
guests to accumulate funds and receive counseling and other supportive services 
which enable independent Hying. 

The program was designed for families with children without other resources 
available who are working, attending classes, or are in progress with a life transi- 
tion and need extra support to make independent living possible and successful. 

Donations of furniture and other household items are appreciated. Financial 
donations, large and small are also welcome. Volunteers are needed who can move 
furniture, provide transportation to and from shopping, serve as a mentor and per- 
form seasonal and maintenance tasks. To volunteer to help, call (847) 662-1340. 

Save-A-Pet 

Adoption Center 

31664 North Fairfield Road, Grayslake, Illinois 60030 

Phone: (847) 740-7788 

Web: vvww.save-a-pet-il.org/ 

Save-A-Pet is a no-kill animal shelter dedicated to finding loving.quality 
homes for each cat and dog in its care. 

Pets are sheltered indefinitely and never euthanized except in cases of 
terminal illness, unrelievable pain and suffering or dangerous and irreversible 
behavior problems. The shelter strives to create an environment which enhances 
both awareness of and support for the humane treatment 
of animals. 

Save-A-Pet is a not-for-profit organization that is 
solely dependent on donations. Donations to the shelter 
are tax deductible to the fullest extent of the law. Dona- 
tions can be sent directly to the shelter address above or 
you can call for more information. Thank you in advance 
for your kindness and generosity. 

Canned and dry dog and cat food are needed all of the 
time. Every little bit helps. The organization also posts a current wish list of need- 
ed items on their web site at www.save-a-pet-il.org/wish_list.htm. 

Save-A-Pet also runs a Thrift & Gift Shop located at 4446 West Oakton Street 
in Skokie. Hours are Tuesday through Saturday 1 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. The phone 
number of the store is (847) 677-8805. Completely staffed by volunteers, all 
proceeds directly benefit the animals at the shelter. Donations are welcome and 
may be dropped off during store hours. 

Perhaps most importantly, Save-A-Pet has many dogs and cats available for 
adoption. Adoption hours are as follows: Mon., Wed. & Fri., 1-5 p.m.; Tues., 
closed; Thurs. 1-8 p.m., Sat., 1 1 a.m. -6 p.m. and Sun. 1-6 p.m. There are qualifi- 
cations that must be met to be eligible and fees due upon adoption. 

Continued on page 19 




■ 



• •• 



December 12th - 16th we will be sponsoring 

a Cans for Tans food drive. 

Bring in at least 3 cans of food and tan for 

1/2 price of the regular session price. 

All donations will be going to the 

. Grant Township Food Pantry. 

There will be daily give-a-ways. 

Tan once or tan every day, the more cans 

the better. 

Join us Monday, December 18th for our 4th Annual 

Customer Appreciation Christmas Party all day) 
Coffee, doughnuts, appetizers, give-a-ways and morel 

Gift Certificates make great holiday gifts for that hard to buy 
person. Purchase a prepackaged gift pack or create your own. 

Tanning packages and lotions, body wraps, manicures, 
pedicures, acrylic nails, 0PI products and more are 

available. 






Hawaiian Island 

Tropical Tan & Nail Spa 

546-8600 



Rl in h Wilson Road, Inglcslde 



December,!, 2000 



CHRISTMAS MEMORIES 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C 1 9 



Continued from page 18 

Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Great Lakes Auxiliary 

Great Lakes, I L , 

Phone: (847) 689-2228 

Hours: Mon.-Fri., 8 a;m. to 4 p.m. 

; -''The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMGRS) is a non profit charitable or- 
ganization designed to provide, in a partnership with the Navy and Marine Corps, 
financial, educational, and other assistance to active duty and retired Sailors and 
Marines and their families, to include widows/widowers and orphans. 

The affairs of the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society are mainly handled by 
volunteers. The Society welcomes volunteers from the active duty, retired, offi- 
cer, and enlisted communities for every facet of its operation. Donations of goods 
. are also accepted. Call for more details. 

Northpoint Achievement Center 

3441 Sheridan Rd.,Zion,TL 60099 
Phone (847) 872-1700 

A social service agency located in Zion, Northpointe is a private non-profit 
vocational and residential center, whosemission is to help individuals with dis- 
abilities be more independent in work and living. 

The center announces its annual Holiday Gift Campaign designed to provide 
the agency's clients a gift from a local patron. For some clients, this will be the 
only gift they receive during the holiday season. Northpointe invites individuals, 
families, businesses, organizations and civic groups to share the joy of this spe- 
cial time of year and "Adopt-a-Client." 

This year Northpointe has over 350 clients to match up with "gift givers." 
Each giver is mailed a client profile listing his or her name, sex, age, clothing sizes 
and three gift ideas. Forgivers who are unable to shop for a gift, monetary dona- 
tions are also gladly accepted. For these special givers, someone from North- 
pointe's staff will purchase an appropriate gift for a client in your name. 

The organization is accepting donations to fund the client's holiday party to 
be held on Dec. 22. There are also a number of opportunities for volunteers to as- 
sist the clients at the holiday party in such areas as food service, coat check and 
distribution of gifts. 

-To request a client profile, volunteer or for more information, call North- 
pointe at (847) 872t1700, ext. 794. 

Liberty Prairie Conservancy . 

32400 North Harris Road, Grayslake, I L 60030 

Phone: (847) 548-5989 

Fax:(847)548-7592 

E-Mail: info@libertyprairie.org 

Web: www.Iibertyprairie.org/ 





Volunteers help Liberty Prairie Conservancy's mission to protect, restore, 
and preserve the prairies, oak savannahs, farmland, forest land, wetlands, 
streams and scenic properties on the Liberty Prairie Reserve. 

Formed by area residents in 1994, the LPC works to enhance the integrity of 
the area through community outreach, stewardship, education, and the promo- 
tion of environmental ethics in Lake County. 

The Conservancy focuses on fostering a better understanding of this cultur- ' 
al and natural landscape and focuses on encouraging growth management that 
will enable this heritage to prevail for future generations. 

The Allendale Association 

P.O. Box 1088, Lake Villa, Illinois 60046 

Phone: (847) 356-2351 

Web: http://ailendale4kids.org/ 

The Allendale Association is a private, not-for-profit social service agency 
serving children and adolescents with moderate to profound emotional and be- 
havioral disabilities. These youth and their families receive care 
and treatment through Allendale's residential treatment pro- 
grams, day treatment special education schools or from commu- 
nity based clinical programs and services. Allendale's communi- 
ty based programs include an outpatient counseling center, fos- 
ter care licensing, training and support, independent living/tran- 
sition support and mentoring services. 
Volunteering can be a rewarding and satisfying experience. Many volunteers 
in the program interact one-on-one with.youths, developing long-term friend- 
ships. Others share their talents with a number of children in various program 
areas. 

Each volunteer is assigned according to his or her talents and interests. Al- 
lendale provides proper training and continuing education, treating volunteers 
with the same respect as professional staff. If you have a group that is interested 
in project based votunteerism, please call the volunteer office. 

Your financial support will help to provide care, education, treatment and 
advocacy for troubled youths and their families. 

Financial contributions can be mailed to the address provided above. 




-.•;: 



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Give 

News to 

Friends & 




A subscription to their community newspaper, 
Holiday special $9.99. Hurry, offer ends December 21 , 2000. Call 245-7500. 

M%H*foMd£d t§»ffltiE«fcg fJSttetwmi^ JSfc^ Mmmm™«te& 





NEWSPA 



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- C"\Q/Lakeland Newspapers 



CHRISTMAS MEMORIES 



December 1, 2000 





Northeastern 




Area Agency 

ON ' 

/U5IIMC5 



Continued from page 1 7 

seriously ill children and to make life a little brighter for many families. The group 
provides hope, strength and joy during a very difficult time in a child's life. Fam- 
ilies often remark that the wish experience empowers their children and becomes 
a sort of emotional treatment for the child's illness. The most common illnesses 
are leukemia, cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy, genetic disorders and AIDS. 

Make-A-Wish of America has fulfilled 80,000 wishes worldwide since its in- 
ception in 1980. The local, northern Illinois chapter has fulfilled 3,000 of those 
wishes to children in the 24 northern-most counties of Illinois. 

Monetary donations are always welcome. Also sought after is the donation 
of frequent flyer miles for air travel. These miles help to fund the travel of chil- 
dren and their families. The McDonald's corporation and its employees recent- 
ly donated more than 2 million miles to the Make-A-Wish Foundation of North- 
ern Illinois. 

To find out more about Make-A-Wish and how you can help, call (312) 943- 
8956. 

Northeast Illinois Area Agency on Aging 

Field office: 245 West Roosevelt Rd. 

Bldg. 6, Units 41-43, West Chicago, IL 60185 

Phone; (630) 293-5990 

Fax: (630) 293-7488 

Web: www.ageguide.org 

The Northeastern Illinois Area Agency on Aging is a non-profit organization 
responsible for developing and coordinating a network of services for older per- 
sons throughout an eight county area of Northeastern Illinois, including Lake and 

McHenry counties. 

For over twenty five years, Northeastern Illi- 
nois Area Agency on Aging has developed and 
coordinated services that enable older per- 
sons to live independently in their own 
homes. The agency is committed to enhanc- 
ing the quality of life for an aging society. 
There are many ways for you to become in- 
volved, ways as varied and unique as the contributions you can make. Become a 
Medicare-fraud buster in Operation Restore Trust, help deliver weekend or hoi-- 
iday meals to homebound elders, support fund-raising events or become a Board 
or Advisory Council member. 

Please call the toll-free Support Line at 1-800-528-2000 (8:30 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m.) ore-mail info@ageguide.org for more information on how you can help. 

Salvation Army 

Regional Office 

5040 N. Pulaski Road, Chicago, IL 60630 

Phone:(312)725-1100 

Web: www.salvationarmy.org 

Internationally, The Salvation Army works in just over 100 countries using 
more than 140 languages. There are over 14,000 Corps (centres for worship) as 
well as a wide range of social, medical, educational and other community ser- 
vices. The group is known for its far-reaching assistance to individuals in need. 

There are several area thrift stores that help to fund the programs of the Sal- 
vation Army. There is one located in Waukegan at 133 S. Genesee, call 623-6170 
for details. There is also one in Gurnee at 3521 Grand Avenue, call 336-8857 for 
more information. 

For pick-up service of donated goods, call (847) 662-7730. 

C.O.O.L. Food Pantry & Transitional Housing Program 

CO.O.L OFFICE 

.658 Grand Ave., Waukegan, IL 60085 

Phone: (847) 662-1230 

Web: www.cooiministries.org/ 

Christian Outreach of Lutherans (C.O.O.L.) is a not-for-profit organization 
created to provide food and housing for the hungry and homeless in Lake 
County, Illinois and surrounding communities. An Open House will be held on 
Sat., Dec. 9 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. for anyone wishing to learn about volunteer 
opportunities. For info., call the Pantry Manager at (847) 662-1230. 

The CO.O.L Food Pantry's front door, at 127 West Water Street in Waukegan, 
Illinois was opened by six local Lutheran churches in 1983. A 
small staff and daily volunteers serve clients. 

The Pantry supplies four days of emergency food to 
clients who are referred by area agencies and churches. The 
Food Pantry helps people who are encountering a life crisis 
and are without adequate emergency resources. 

The hours are Mon. and Wed. from 2-6 p.m., and Tues., 
Thurs. and Fri. from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. 

A donation of $30 will feed a family of four for four days. $100 will feed twelve 
individuals for four days. Please help the Food Pantry by sending donations to 
the address provided above. 

The Pantry appreciates financial donations, large and small, which are tax 
deductible. Also welcome are volunteers to shop for and transport food, bag 
groceries, and serve clients in the Food Pantry, Monday-Friday 10a.m.-2p.m. 

Those who organize and participate in local church and business food 
drives as well as those who join a local CROP Walk are also greatly appreciated* 




The Transitional Housing Program also run by C.O.O.L. was created in 1988 
to provide rent and utility-free housing units to those in transition toward self- 
sufficiency. Transitional Housing provides six to twelve months support for 
guests to accumulate funds and receive counseling and other supportive services 
which enable independent living. 

The program was designed for families with children without other resources 
available who are working, attending classes, or are in progress with a life transi- 
tion and need extra support to make independent living possible and successful. 

Donations of furniture and other household items are appreciated. Financial 
donations, large and small are also welcome. Volunteers are needed who can move 
furniture, provide transportation to and from shopping, serve as a mentor and per- 
form seasonal and maintenance tasks. To volunteer to help, call (847) 662- 1340. 

Save-A-Pet 

Adoption Center 

31664 North Fairfield Road, Grayslake, Illinois 60030 

Phone: (847) 740-7788 

Web: vvww.save-a-pet-il.org/ 

Save-A-Pet is a no-kill animal shelter dedicated to finding loving.-quality 
homes for each cat and dog in its care. 

Pets are sheltered indefinitely and never euthanized except in cases of 
terminal illness, unrelievable pain and suffering or dangerous and irreversible 
behavior problems. The shelter strives to create an environment which enhances 
both awareness of and support for the humane treatment 
of animals. 

Save-A-Pet is a not-for-profit organization that is 
solely dependent on donations. Donations to the shelter 
are tax deductible to the fullest extent of the law. Dona- 
tions can be sent directly to the shelter address above or 
you can call for more information. Thank you in advance 
for your kindness and generosity. 

Canned and dry dog and cat food are needed all of the 
time. Every little bit helps. The organization also posts a current wish list of need- 
ed items on their web site at www.save-a-pet-il.org/wishjist.htm. 

Save-A-Pet also runs a Thrift & Gift Shop located at 4446 West Oakton Street 
in Skokie. Hours are Tuesday through Saturday 1 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. The phone 
number of the store is (847) 677-8805. Completely staffed by volunteers, all 
proceeds directly benefit the animals at the shelter. Donations are welcome and 
may be dropped off during store hours. 

Perhaps most importantly, Save-A-Pet has many dogs and cats available for 
adoption. Adoption hours are as follows: Mon., Wed. & Fri., 1-5 p.m.; Tues., 
closed; Thurs. 1-8 p.m., Sat., 1 1 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sun. 1-6 p.m. There are qualifi- 
cations that must be met to be eligible and fees due upon adoption. 

Continued on page 19 










• I • 



December 12th - 16th we will be sponsoring 

a Cans for Tans food drive. 

Bring in at least 3 cans of food and tan for 

1/2 price of the regular session price. 

All donations will be going to the 

Grant Township Food Pantry. 

There will be daily give-a-ways. 

Tan once or tan every day, the more cans 

the better. 

Join us Monday, December 18th for our 4th Annual 

Customer Appreciation Christmas Party all day! 
Coffee, doughnuts, appetizers, give-a-ways and morel 

Gift Certificates make great holiday gifts for that hard to buy 
person. Purchase a prepackaged gift pack or create your own. 

Tanning packages and lotions, body wraps, manicures, 
pedicures, acrylic nails, 0PI products and more are 

available. 



Hawaiian Island 

Tropical Tan & Nail Spa 

546-8600 



Rl 114 & Wilson Road. Ingltlldc 



MB 



December.!, 2000 



CHRISTMAS MEMORIES 



Lakeland Newspapers/ 'C1 9 v 



Continued from page 18 

Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Great Lakes Auxiliary 

Great Lakes, IL * 

Phone:(847)689-2228 

Hours: Mon.-Fri., 8 aim. to 4 p.m. 

"■'■ "The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) is a non profit charitable or- 
ganization designed to provide, in a partnership with the Navy and Marine Corps, 
financial, educational, and other assistance to active duty and retired Sailors and 
Marines and their families, to include widows/widowers and orphans, 

The affairs of the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society are mainly handled by 
volunteers. The Society welcomes volunteers from the active duty, retired, offi- 
cer, and enlisted communities for every facet of its operation. Donations of goods 
are also accepted. Call for more details. 

Northpoint Achievement Center 

3441 Sheridan Rd„ Zion, IL 60099 
Phone (847) 872- 1700 

A social service agency located in Zion. Northpointe is a private non-profit 
vocational and residential center, whose mission is to help individuals with dis- 
abilities be more independent in work and living. 

The center announces its annual Holiday Gift Campaign designed to provide 
the agency's clients a gift from a local patron. For some clients, this will be the 
only gift they receive during the holiday season. Northpointe invites individuals, 
families, businesses, organizations and civic groups to share the joy of this spe- 
cial time of year and "Adopt-a-CIient." 

This year Northpointe has over 350 clients to. match up with "gift givers." 
Each giver is mailed a client profile listing his or her name, sex, age, clothing sizes 
and three gift ideas. For givers who are unable to shop for a gift, monetary dona- 
tions are also gladly accepted. For these special givers, someone from North- 
pointe's staff will purchase an appropriate gift for a client in your name. 

The organization is accepting donations to fund the client's holiday party to 
be held on Dec. 22. There are also a number of opportunities for volunteers to as- 
sist the clients at the holiday party in such areas as food service, coat check and 
distribution of gifts. 

To request a client profile, volunteer or for more information, call North- 
pointe at (847) 872t1700, ext. 794. 

Liberty Prairie Conservancy . 

32400 North Harris Road, Grayslake, IL 60030 

Phone: (847) 548-5989 

Fax: (847) 548-7592 

E-Mail: info@!ibertyprairie.org 

Web: www.libertyprairie.org/ 




Volunteers help Liberty Prairie Conservancy's mission to protect, restore, 
and preserve the prairies, oak savannahs, farmland, forest land, wetlands, 
streams and scenic properties on the Liberty Prairie Reserve. 

Formed by area residents in 1994, the LPC works to enhance the integrity of 
the area through community outreach, stewardship, education, and the promo- 
tion of environmental ethics in Lake County. 

The Conservancy focuses on fostering a better understanding of this cultur- • 
al and natural landscape and focuses on encouraging growth management that 
will enable this heritage to prevail for future generations. 

The Allendale Association 

P.O. Box 1088, Lake Villa, Illinois 60046 

Phone: (847) 356-2351 

Web: http://allendale4kids.org7 

The Allendale Association is a private, not-for-profit social service agency 
serving children and adolescents with moderate to'profound emotional and be- 
havioral disabilities. These youth and their families receive care 
and treatment through Allendale's residential treatment pro- 
grams, day treatment special education schools or from commu- 
nity based clinical programs and services. Allendale's communi- 
ty based programs include an outpatient counseling center, fos- 
ter care licensing, training and support, independent living/ tran- 
sition support and mentoring services. 
Volunteering can be a rewarding and satisfying experience. Many volunteers 
in the program interact one-on-one with.youths, developing long-term friend- 
ships. Others share their talents with a number of children in various program 
areas. 

Each volunteer is assigned according to his or her talents and interests. Al- 
lendale provides proper training and continuing education, treating volunteers 
with the same respect as professional staff. If you have a group that is interested 
in project based volunteerism, please call the volunteer office. 

Your financial support will help to provide care, education, treatment and 
advocacy for troubled youths and their families. 

Financial contributions can be mailed to the address provided above. 




| 










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Give Good 

News to 

Friends & 

Family 

A subscription to their community newspaper, 
Holiday special $9.99. Hurry, offer ends December 21, 2000. Call 245-7500. 




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NEWSPAPERS 




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°' C20 /Lakeland Newspapers 



. 



CHRISTMAS MEMORIES 



December!, 2000 



A Seven Year Wish 

Tammy Marchetta 
Vernon Hills 

As a child growing up on a farm in Michigan I spent every birthday wish, Christ- 
mas list and turkey wishbone hoping to get a horse. My two ponies, Cocoa and 
Prince, didn't go the speed that I was looking for. I wanted to gallop and swim across 
the Muskegon River and my two ponies were stubborn as mules, didn't like water 
and liked to trot. Cocoa and Prince were great for buggies, but eating grass was their 
true love. 

Finally, after seven years of asking my parents for the horse, they realized that 1 
wasn't giving up. 1 even started saving my allowance for the saddle and did extra 
farm chores. 

One Christmas morning when I was twelve-years-old, my dream came true. Af- 
ter all the gifts were opened and we were on the way to Grandma's for dinner, my 
parents slowed down by a field. In the far, foggy distance they pointed out my Christ- 
mas present. He was a beautiful Appaloosa. After I trained Felix, we spent many days 
riding and swimming in the Muskegon River. 

I learned that if you desire anything enough there is a way. My persistence paid 
off, it was just a matter of time. 





mm 



Optical 



EYEGLASSES 

Any Frame • Any Prescription 
Scratch Resistant Plastic Lenses 



[Specialty Lenses, no-line bifocals & lens Healmenl extra, Eye exoms available | 
I from licensed Independent doctors of optometry at or next to most depart- 
ments. Valid prescription required. Moy not be combined with other discount, 
J vision care plan or prior orders. Vdlid only ot porllclpallng U.S. Sears stores. Not I 
I valid In AR, OK, Me ond PR, In CA. Sears Optical Is a service ol Western Stales | 
[optical inc. Registered dispensing Opticians, Doctors In CA practice independ- 
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I 



ROUND LAKE BEACH 

Mallard Creek Shopping Center (Com® of Mns iw. and Rouie.83) 

(847) 740-2020 

Gregory Hasto, O.D. 



Eyeglasses 
Eye Exams 



jf^V^H'.-" 



■.--.. 

•Contact Lenses • 

. ■ - . . . 



Tammy Marchetta and daughter Tarin from Vernon Hills with Jennifer Smith and 
daughter Theressa from Grant, Michigan. - Submitted by Tammy Marchetta ^ 

Holiday Candlelight concert 
planned at Pops Highwood 

Add some sparkle to the holiday season with the Holiday Candlelight Concert from 
6-9 p.m., on Sunday, December 10, at Pops Highwood, 214 Green Bay Road; Highwood, 
featuring Judy Roberts "Santa Baby's" Quartet with Jackie Allen. 

"We are excited to present Highland Park's won Judy Roberts at our Candlelight con- 
cert for the third year in a row," said Tom Verhey, owner of Pop's Highwood. "Judy's 
melodic vocals and striking piano style are sure to warm everyone's spirit and spread hol- 
iday cheer throughout the club." 

The cost is $10 per person and reservations are accepted. Full beverage and appe- 
tizer menu available during concert. Free parking. For more information and reserva- 
tions, call 266-13 13. 



I i»i h— i iHHr 




Layaway till Christmas Eve 





2000 Models BMX SalP 

•Schwann •G.T./Dyno 
• Redline • Mosh 



rz 



Stocking stuffier Ideas 

BMX Accessories • Helmets • Cloves 

Cycle Computers • Oakley Sunglasses, 

Bells, Horns, and More! 

Gift Certificates Available 







— I Antioch 
— I Schwinn 




890 Main St., Antioch, IL 

395-6500 



Backyard Christmas Trees 

Susan Szybkowski 
Vernon Hills 

Picking out and cutting the Christmas tree from the back end of our properly is one ol 
my best Christmas memories. Sometimes after they were cut, it would be very evident that 
the tree was lop-sided or even lacked a good side. Our dad would have to wire on extra 
branches to fill in the gaps because most of the trees had grown to close together. 

It was great fun knowing that the Christmas tree would come from our own yard. Long 
before Christmas all the kids would be circling the trees in the backyard trying to persuade 
the other siblings which would be the perfect Christmas tree. 



1' 



CRAFT 4 TRADE FAIR 

HOW OPEN! 

Antiques ♦ Furniture 

Collectibles ♦ Housewares 

Sports Memorabilia 

Candy ♦> Florals 

Health Products & Much More! 



• o 



T 




Tuesday-Thursday 10am-6pm 
Friday 10am-9pm • Sunday 10am-5pm 

FOX AUCTION 6 
EXPO CENTER 

75 S. Rte. 12 • Fox Lake, IL 

(847) 587-8009 

We buy, sell 
or trade